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PHL 351 – Social Philosophy

2014 – S1 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Mark Kelly
Contact via mark.kelly@mq.edu.au
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
39cp or admission to GDipArts
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
Continuing the inquiry commenced in PHL254, this unit explores in more depth how social transformations might both foster and hinder the realisation of our freedom and human potential. Economic growth is generally taken to be an unquestionable good but what are its costs at a social and environmental level? Modern technology is taken to be the key to the future but what impact does it have on our relationships with nature? A successful career is often accepted as essential to happiness but is contemporary work a fully rewarding experience? Are the economic inequalities generated by contemporary social and economic transformations justifiable in a democratic society? This unit addresses these questions first by examining the social philosophy tradition (the Frankfurt School of critical theory), focusing on key themes such as the economic rationalisation of society, the effects of this rationalisation on individuals and communities, and the prospects for social freedom in an economically rationalised world. The second part of the unit then turns to contemporary approaches in social philosophy (Axel Honneth) that offer critical analyses and possible alternatives to some of the most pressing issues we face, including economic and social injustice, the environmental crisis, and social pathologies arising from new work conditions and career demands.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://students.mq.edu.au/important-dates

Learning Outcomes

  1. A good understanding of the history and significance of European social philosophy.
  2. A good understanding of the relevance of theoretical approaches considered for broader philosophical, social, cultural and political debates.
  3. An ability to understand and analyse arguments and concepts in European social philosophy, and to evaluate different philosophical theories in relation to other relevant disciplinary approaches.
  4. An ability to apply philosophical theories and concepts to other areas of social and cultural practice.
  5. To articulate ideas clearly, cogently, and convincingly through critical analysis, interpretation, and appropriate forms for written expression.
  6. To participate actively in group and online discussion and in group learning activities during tutorials.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Online quiz 10% Friday 28th March
Case Study 30% Friday 25th April
Philosophical Essay 45% Monday, 16th June
Tutorial Participation 15% Throughout semester

Online quiz

Due: Friday 28th March
Weighting: 10%

An online quiz to be done in Week 4. This quiz will involve writing short answers to questions based on the weekly topics covered in the first three weeks of the course. The quiz will be available online and accessible to students for one week; once a student commences the quiz there will ba set time period to complete the quiz (20-30 mins). 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • A good understanding of the history and significance of European social philosophy.
  • To participate actively in group and online discussion and in group learning activities during tutorials.

Case Study

Due: Friday 25th April
Weighting: 30%

This assignment tests your ability to explain and apply some of the philosophical ideas and theories that you have been studying. You will be given a problem or 'case study' scenario and asked to choose among a number of theoretical approaches to analyse and explain this problem or case study. You may also be asked to compare and contrast different theoretical approaches, and to comment on the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, or to defend your choice of theory against competing alternatives. The aim will be to give you practice in analysing and applying philosophical ideas to concrete situations and to be able to argue for or against particular theoretical approaches.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • A good understanding of the history and significance of European social philosophy.
  • A good understanding of the relevance of theoretical approaches considered for broader philosophical, social, cultural and political debates.
  • An ability to understand and analyse arguments and concepts in European social philosophy, and to evaluate different philosophical theories in relation to other relevant disciplinary approaches.
  • An ability to apply philosophical theories and concepts to other areas of social and cultural practice.
  • To articulate ideas clearly, cogently, and convincingly through critical analysis, interpretation, and appropriate forms for written expression.
  • To participate actively in group and online discussion and in group learning activities during tutorials.

Philosophical Essay

Due: Monday, 16th June
Weighting: 45%

These major assignments are designed to test your ability to engage with a topic in depth. Writing an essay tests your ability to express, analyse and organise key ideas clearly and systematically, and to develop an argument or point of view in a sustained and coherent manner. Essays are also the primary mode in which philosophical research is conducted; hence writing essays in philosophy units helps enhance students' abilities to analyse, interpret, and propose philosophical points of view on a variety of topics and problems.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • A good understanding of the history and significance of European social philosophy.
  • A good understanding of the relevance of theoretical approaches considered for broader philosophical, social, cultural and political debates.
  • An ability to understand and analyse arguments and concepts in European social philosophy, and to evaluate different philosophical theories in relation to other relevant disciplinary approaches.
  • An ability to apply philosophical theories and concepts to other areas of social and cultural practice.
  • To articulate ideas clearly, cogently, and convincingly through critical analysis, interpretation, and appropriate forms for written expression.
  • To participate actively in group and online discussion and in group learning activities during tutorials.

Tutorial Participation

Due: Throughout semester
Weighting: 15%

Tutorials are an important site of individual and group learning. Philosophy tutorials involve students in active discussion with the tutor and fellow students, raising and responding to questions, analysing problems, and engaging in individual and group learning activities with the tutor. Students will also prepare a brief essay plan/opening paragraph for your final essay as part of your tutorial participation. Students are expected to attend at least 75% of classes.

Weekly tutorials will begin in WEEK 2 and continue until Week 13. Tutorials revolve around questions. Firstly, students are expected to bring questions to the tutorial about the reading, including things students find difficult to understand, criticisms you may have of the reading, or points you think require clarification. The expectation is that students attempt to answer their questions on the reading yourselves and bring your tentative answers to the tutorial for discussion. Secondly, there will also be questions set to guide your reading and guide tutorial discussion.

Students will be judged by the quality of their contributions rather than sheer quantity, but there is an expectation that each student should contribute questions or answers to at least two tutorial discussions in the course of the semester. Each student will be given ample opportunity to do this in later weeks if they have not fulfilled this requirement earlier in the semester. To this end, students are encouraged to prepare answers to set discussion questions in a written format, which can then be submitted if need be as evidence of work done.

10% of the 15% tutorial participation mark will be on the basis of quality of engagement with discussions. The remaining 5% will be for an essay plan produced in advance of the essay.

External students will be required to participate in weekly online tutorials where set questions will also be discussed and interaction between students will be fostered. The course convenor will also participate in these discussions from time to time, mainly in a facilitating and moderating role.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • A good understanding of the history and significance of European social philosophy.
  • A good understanding of the relevance of theoretical approaches considered for broader philosophical, social, cultural and political debates.
  • An ability to understand and analyse arguments and concepts in European social philosophy, and to evaluate different philosophical theories in relation to other relevant disciplinary approaches.
  • To participate actively in group and online discussion and in group learning activities during tutorials.

Delivery and Resources

Technology Used and Required

This unit uses an ilearn website and Echo360 lecture recordings (https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/login/MQ/). The website contains links to lecture notes, ilecture recordings, and other learning materials you might require for the course.

PHL351 will be delivered using a combination of lectures (live and pre-recorded) and tutorial/seminar discussion groups. Most weeks there will be live lectures that will be recorded via the ECHO360 recording system and made available via the website. On some weeks there will be pre-recorded lectures that I will upload via ECHO360 on the website. Students will be informed as to which lectures will be live and which will be pre-recorded for viewing or listening via the website. Students will therefore require access to a computer and a good internet connection in order to participate in the unit effectively.

 

Lecture and Tutorial Times

There are two lectures per week:

Monday 2pm–3pm    C5C 209

Thursday 11am–12pm  W5A 205

 

Students should attend both lectures, and one tutorial.

There are two tutorial classes scheduled:

Monday       3pm–4pm W6B 282

Thursday     12pm–1pm  W5C 302

 

Weekly tutorials will begin in WEEK 2 and will continue until Week 13. There will also be weekly discussion questions that students are asked to answer. 

External students will be required to participate in online tutorials where set questions will be discussed and interaction between students will be encouraged across the semester. I will also participate in these discussions from time to time, maninly in a facilitating role.

 

Learning and Teaching Strategy

This unit will driven by student-centred learning strategies, combining lectures with active seminar-style discussion. Learning technologies such as ilearn websites, lecture recordings, and other electronic resources will be used throughout to facilitate learning. Active participation and group learning activities will be emphasised throughout the semester. Student feedback concerning the content and delivery of the course will also be encouraged.

The unit is taught through lectures and tutorials (two lectures and one tutorial per week). Tutorials will be run as weekly workshops dealing with questions and problems arising from the weekly readings and lecture material. Students will be expected to attend the weekly lectures and to read set readings in preparation for tutorials. Active participation is encouraged: asking questions, making comments, raising issues for discussion by the group, etc. Students are also encouraged to relate the lecture and reading material to other areas of study and to broader social, cultural and political debates. External students are required to participate in online discussions.

Information about iLearn and other resources:

Very useful information and resources for using ilearn can be found at this website:

http://www.mq.edu.au/iLearn/

The web page for this unit can also be found at the mq ilearn website:

https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/login/MQ/

 

Changes since the last offering of this unit:

Since last being offered this unit has undergone the following changes:

Revision of learning activities, outcomes, and assessment tasks;

Curriculum mapping of relationship between activities, outcomes, and graduate capabilities;

Addition of new course content including new topics and more updated weekly readings.

 

Required and Recommended Texts and/or Materials

PHL351 Social Philosophy will be using electronically available readings, either via e-reserve at the library or via online open access websites.

Recommended websites, articles, and video clips will also be made available via the PHL351 website. A guide to further reading/recommended bibliography will also be posted for students.

Unit Schedule

Week 1 (3rd March): Enlightenment

The origins of critical reflection on society.

  • Immanuel Kant, ‘What is Enlightenment?’online here: http://www.columbia.edu/acis/ets/CCREAD/etscc/kant.html
  • Michel Foucault, ‘What is Enlightenment?’ S. Lotringer , ed., The politics of truth , 2nd edn. (New York: Semiotext(e) , 2007 ), pp. 97 – 119 . Translated by Catherine Porter.

Further reading

The rest of S. Lotringer , ed., The politics of truth, 2nd edn. (New York: Semiotext(e) , 2007).

 

Week 2 (10th March): Fetishism

Lukács’ extension of the Marxist diagnosis of ‘inversion’; contemporary society as a ‘society of the spectacle’; media in contemporary economies.

  • Georg Lukács, “Reification and the Consciousness of the Proletariat,” History and Class Consciousness (London: Merlin Press, 1971), pp. 72–103.
  • Guy Debord, “Separation Perfected,” The Society of the Spectacle (New York: Zone Books, 1995), pp. 12–24, 85–91.

Further reading

  • Karl Marx, “The Fetishism of Commodities and the Secret Thereof” in The Portable Karl Marx (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1983), pp. 444–57.
  • Axel Honneth, Reification. A New Look at an Old Idea (OUP, 2008)

 

Week 3 (17th March): Repression

Adorno and Horkheimer’s idea of a ‘dialectic of Enlightenment’; the paradox of a rational progress leading to self-destruction; late capitalism as ‘total administration’ of life. Marcuse’s diagnosis of ‘new forms of control’; technology; the repression of nature within and without; the idea of a ‘liberation of nature’.

  • Theodor Adorno, “Psychology and Sociology (Part One),” New Left Review 1:46 (1967), pp. 1-10 / 116-125.
  • Herbert Marcuse, “The New Forms of Control,” “The Conquest of the Unhappy Consciousness: Repressive Desublimation,” One Dimensional Man: Studies in the Ideology of Advanced Industrial Society (London: Routledge, 1964), pp. 1-18, 70-81 / 127-142.
  • Herbert Marcuse, “Aggressiveness in Advanced Industrial Society,” Negations: Essays in Critical Theory (London: Free Association Books, 1988), pp. 248-269 / 144-154.

 

Week 4 (24th March): Ideology

Althusser’s theory of ideology; subjectivity and capitalist reproduction.

 

Week 5 (31st March): Power

Foucault’s ‘cutting off the head of the king’ in political theory.

  • Michel Foucault, ‘Objective’ and ‘Method’, History of Sexuality Vol. I (London: Penguin, 1976), pp. 81–102 (online access via library website).
  • Michel Foucault, ‘The Subject and Power’in James D. Faubion (ed.) Power: The Essential Works of Michel Foucault Vol. 3 (London: Penguin, 2002), pp. 326–48.

Further reading

  • Mark G. E. Kelly, ‘Power 1’ and ‘Power 2’, The Political Philosophy of Michel Foucault (London: Routledge, 2009).
  • Mark G. E. Kelly, Foucault's History of sexuality. Volume 1, The will to knowledge (Edinburgh: EUP, 2013) pp. 52–74.

 

Week 6 (7th April): Biopolitics

  • Michel Foucault, ‘Lecture Two: 14 January 1976’ in Colin Gordon (ed.), Power/Knowledge (Brighton: Harvester, 1980) pp.91–108 (full book available online via library)
  • Michel Foucault, “17 March 1976”, from Society Must Be Defended, pp. 239–64.
  • Michel Foucault, “Right of Death and Power of Life”, from The Foucault Reader, pp. 258–72.
  • Gilles Deleuze, "Postscript on Societies of Control", October 59, Winter 1992, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, pp. 3-7. Available online at: http://www.nadir.org/nadir/archiv/netzkritik/societyofcontrol.html

 

 Mid-semester break 12 - 27 Apr 2014

 

Week 7 (28th April): Lifeworld

Jürgen Habermas’ key intervention in social philosophy; the increase in complexity of contemporary society; system versus lifeworld.

  • Jürgen Habermas, “The Concept of the Lifeworld,” “The Uncoupling of System and Lifeworld,” “The Tasks of a Critical Theory,” The Theory of Communicative Action vol. 2 (Boston: Beacon Press, 1987), pp. 134-152, 153-155, 382-397 / 156-173.
  • Jürgen Habermas, “The Dialectic of Rationalisation,” in P. Dews (ed.), Autonomy and Solidarity (London: Verso, 1986), pp. 104-115 / 174-188.

Background reading

  • Samir Gandesha, “Marcuse, Habermas and the Critique of Technology,” in J. Abromeit and W. Cobb (eds.), Herbert Marcuse: A Critical Reader (London: Routledge, 2004), pp. 188-208 / 180-190

 

Week 8 (5th May): Recognition

Problems with the ‘colonisation thesis’; recognition as core mechanism of social integration; the spheres of recognition: love, rights, social esteem; modernity as moral progress; the centrality of social movements for social progress.

  • Axel Honneth, The Struggle for Recognition. The Moral Grammar of Social Conflicts (MIT Press, 1995), Chapter 5.

Further reading

  • Axel Honneth, “Habermas’ Theory of Society,” Critique of Power (Cambridge Mass.: The MIT Press, 1991), pp. 282-303.
  • Axel Honneth, “Disrespect and Resistance,” The Struggle for Recognition (London: Polity Press, 1995), pp. 160-170 / 204-209.
  • Axel Honneth, “Redistribution as Recognition” and “The Point of Recognition,” in N. Fraser and A. Honneth, Redistribution or Recognition? A Political-Philosophical Exchange (London: Verso, 2003), pp. 138-143, 180-189.

 

Week 9 (12th May): Autonomy

Cornelius Castoriadis’s psychoanalytic theory of societal development and freedom.

 

Week 10 (19th May): Nation

Étienne Balibar on racism and nationalism in modern Europe.

  • Étienne Balibar, ‘Is There a “Neo-Racism”?’ in Étienne Balibar and Immanuel Wallerstein, Race, Nation, Class (London: Verso, 1991), pp. 17–28 (library says it has full text of book online, but I haven’t been able to access it to date)
  • Étienne Balibar, ‘The Nation Form’, Review Vol. 13, No. 3 (Summer, 1990) , pp. 329-361

Further reading

  • ‘Racism and Nationalism’ in Race, Nation, Class

 

Week 11 (26th May): Human Rights

The question of human rights and globalisation. Challenges for liberal democracies in a globalised world: human rights, the global economy, liberal democracy. Habermas and Ranciere on rights, politics, and democracy.

  • 
Jürgen Habermas, ‘The Concept Of Human Dignity And The Realistic Utopia Of Human Rights’, Metaphilosophy, Volume 41, Issue 4, pages 464–480, July 2010

  • Jacques Rancière, "Who is the Subject of the Rights of Man?" South Atlantic Quarterly vol.103, no2/3 , 2004, pp. 297-310.

 

Week 12 (2nd June): Ethics

Is the ethical-moral critique of human rights' violations under conditions of globalisation enough? Badiou's critique of human rights discourse and liberal democracy. The relationship between philosophy, politics, and democracy.

  • Alain Badiou, "Does Man Exist?" and "Ethics as a Figure of Nihilism" from his Ethics, pp. 4-17, and pp. 30-37, 58–73, 78–85 
  • Badiou, "Philosophy and Politics", from his Infinite Thought, pp. 69-78.
  • Badiou, "A Speculative Disquisition on the Concept of Democracy", from his Metapolitics, pp. 78- 85.

Further reading: rest of Ethics

 

Week 13 (9th June): Reading Week 

No scheduled lectures: tutorials will be devoted to essay writing workshops.

Essay due Monday, 16th June (first week of exam period)

Learning and Teaching Activities

Lectures

Live and recorded lectures delivered by Philosophy staff.

Tutorials

Active participation in group learning activities, discussion, and engagement with other students in the course.

Personal reading

Reading of weekly readings and online materials as directed including notetaking where appropriate.

Library research

Academic research using library resources and drawing on recommended bibliographies, course website materials, and students' own research.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy  http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy.html

Grading Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/grading/policy.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Grievance Management Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/grievance_management/policy.html

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://informatics.mq.edu.au/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A good understanding of the history and significance of European social philosophy.
  • A good understanding of the relevance of theoretical approaches considered for broader philosophical, social, cultural and political debates.
  • An ability to understand and analyse arguments and concepts in European social philosophy, and to evaluate different philosophical theories in relation to other relevant disciplinary approaches.
  • An ability to apply philosophical theories and concepts to other areas of social and cultural practice.
  • To articulate ideas clearly, cogently, and convincingly through critical analysis, interpretation, and appropriate forms for written expression.
  • To participate actively in group and online discussion and in group learning activities during tutorials.

Assessment tasks

  • Online quiz
  • Case Study
  • Philosophical Essay
  • Tutorial Participation

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A good understanding of the history and significance of European social philosophy.
  • A good understanding of the relevance of theoretical approaches considered for broader philosophical, social, cultural and political debates.
  • An ability to understand and analyse arguments and concepts in European social philosophy, and to evaluate different philosophical theories in relation to other relevant disciplinary approaches.
  • An ability to apply philosophical theories and concepts to other areas of social and cultural practice.
  • To articulate ideas clearly, cogently, and convincingly through critical analysis, interpretation, and appropriate forms for written expression.
  • To participate actively in group and online discussion and in group learning activities during tutorials.

Assessment tasks

  • Case Study
  • Philosophical Essay
  • Tutorial Participation

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A good understanding of the history and significance of European social philosophy.
  • A good understanding of the relevance of theoretical approaches considered for broader philosophical, social, cultural and political debates.
  • An ability to understand and analyse arguments and concepts in European social philosophy, and to evaluate different philosophical theories in relation to other relevant disciplinary approaches.
  • An ability to apply philosophical theories and concepts to other areas of social and cultural practice.
  • To articulate ideas clearly, cogently, and convincingly through critical analysis, interpretation, and appropriate forms for written expression.
  • To participate actively in group and online discussion and in group learning activities during tutorials.

Assessment tasks

  • Case Study
  • Philosophical Essay
  • Tutorial Participation

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A good understanding of the history and significance of European social philosophy.
  • An ability to apply philosophical theories and concepts to other areas of social and cultural practice.
  • To participate actively in group and online discussion and in group learning activities during tutorials.

Assessment tasks

  • Case Study
  • Philosophical Essay
  • Tutorial Participation

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A good understanding of the history and significance of European social philosophy.
  • An ability to understand and analyse arguments and concepts in European social philosophy, and to evaluate different philosophical theories in relation to other relevant disciplinary approaches.
  • An ability to apply philosophical theories and concepts to other areas of social and cultural practice.
  • To articulate ideas clearly, cogently, and convincingly through critical analysis, interpretation, and appropriate forms for written expression.
  • To participate actively in group and online discussion and in group learning activities during tutorials.

Assessment tasks

  • Case Study
  • Philosophical Essay
  • Tutorial Participation

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A good understanding of the history and significance of European social philosophy.
  • A good understanding of the relevance of theoretical approaches considered for broader philosophical, social, cultural and political debates.
  • An ability to apply philosophical theories and concepts to other areas of social and cultural practice.

Assessment tasks

  • Case Study
  • Philosophical Essay
  • Tutorial Participation

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A good understanding of the history and significance of European social philosophy.
  • A good understanding of the relevance of theoretical approaches considered for broader philosophical, social, cultural and political debates.
  • An ability to apply philosophical theories and concepts to other areas of social and cultural practice.

Assessment task

  • Tutorial Participation

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A good understanding of the history and significance of European social philosophy.
  • A good understanding of the relevance of theoretical approaches considered for broader philosophical, social, cultural and political debates.
  • An ability to understand and analyse arguments and concepts in European social philosophy, and to evaluate different philosophical theories in relation to other relevant disciplinary approaches.
  • An ability to apply philosophical theories and concepts to other areas of social and cultural practice.
  • To articulate ideas clearly, cogently, and convincingly through critical analysis, interpretation, and appropriate forms for written expression.
  • To participate actively in group and online discussion and in group learning activities during tutorials.

Assessment tasks

  • Online quiz
  • Case Study
  • Philosophical Essay
  • Tutorial Participation

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A good understanding of the history and significance of European social philosophy.
  • A good understanding of the relevance of theoretical approaches considered for broader philosophical, social, cultural and political debates.
  • An ability to understand and analyse arguments and concepts in European social philosophy, and to evaluate different philosophical theories in relation to other relevant disciplinary approaches.
  • An ability to apply philosophical theories and concepts to other areas of social and cultural practice.
  • To articulate ideas clearly, cogently, and convincingly through critical analysis, interpretation, and appropriate forms for written expression.
  • To participate actively in group and online discussion and in group learning activities during tutorials.

Assessment tasks

  • Case Study
  • Philosophical Essay
  • Tutorial Participation