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MAS 205 – Introduction to the Cinema

2016 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Co-convener, lecturer
Dr. Jane Simon
By appointment
Co-convenver, lecturer, tutor
Dr. Andrew Frost
Y3A 165G
By appointment
Tutor
Dr. Intan Paramaditha
By appoinment
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
12cp
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit is an introduction to: 1) some of the main theoretical issues and debates that have defined film studies as an area of cultural interest; and 2) some of the key historical moments in classical Hollywood filmmaking and international filmmaking (from the 1940s through to more recent times). Lectures and tutorials, in conjunction with weekly film screenings, consider topics such as the codes, conventions, and aesthetics of film narrative; film genres; film styles; film canons; modes of storytelling; the relation between fiction film and documentary film (and their hybrids).

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  2. Develop an expansive historical knowledge of film theory.
  3. Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  4. Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  5. Demonstrate skills in independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals.
  6. Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.
  7. Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Participation 10% Ongoing
Unit Reading Analysis 15% As scheduled
Short Essay 20% 5pm, Thursday, March 24, 2016
Essay 35% 5pm Friday 13th May
Film Log 20% 5pm Friday 3rd June

Participation

Due: Ongoing
Weighting: 10%

Tutorials are compulsory. You must attend, be punctual for, and actively participate in lectures and tutorials to pass the unit. You must notify your tutor as soon as possible if you believe you may be absent at any stage and provide evidence of a medical or personal emergency to Ask.mq before the absence where possible but no later than three days from the first day of absence. You will be expected to participate in class discussions as much as possible and you must come prepared to every tutorial having:

a) closely read the required readings

b) attended the screening and lecture

 

Marking Criteria

  • Preparation for class and active participation (by contributing to large and small group discussions and participating in tutorial activities)
  • Ability to engage with key concepts and themes covered in readings and lectures in relation to specific films.

 

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.

Unit Reading Analysis

Due: As scheduled
Weighting: 15%

Each week two or more students will work together to present an analysis of that week's unit readings to the tutorial class. The analysis should offer a summary of each reading as well as an interpretation of the arguments as they relate to the film under discussion, offer a comparative analysis of the readings with others in the unit and other academic texts outside the unit, and a critical evaluation of the reading overall.  The group will lead the class in a discussion of the key points raised by the group's analysis.

Marking Criteria

  • Understanding and critical engagement with key readings in the unit
  • Comparison and analysis of key concepts in the unit reading
  • Critical analysis of relevant film/s
  • Independent research within the discipline
  • Organisation of argument
  • Clarity of communication

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  • Develop an expansive historical knowledge of film theory.
  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Demonstrate skills in independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form

Short Essay

Due: 5pm, Thursday, March 24, 2016
Weighting: 20%

In 750 words you will produce an analysis of a film of your own choosing [that is, a film not included in the unit schedule] based on one of the approaches to film analysis studied in the first three weeks of semester, your essay being a study of either the film's approach to mis-en-scene, its narrative structure or its relation to genre theory. 

Your essay should demonstrate wide reading and in-depth critical analysis. You are expected to draw upon the weekly readings as well as find other relevant academic sources. You should base your research on academic journal articles and books.

 

Marking Criteria

• Understanding and critical engagement with key readings in the unit

• Comparison and analysis of key concepts in the unit

• Critical analysis of relevant film/s

• Independent research within the discipline

• Use of research and reading to support the argument

• Organisation of argument including clear addressing of the question

• Clarity of communication

• Accurate and appropriate referencing


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  • Develop an expansive historical knowledge of film theory.
  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Demonstrate skills in independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form

Essay

Due: 5pm Friday 13th May
Weighting: 35%

A 2000 word essay.

For your major essay you must choose from one of the topics/questions distributed in class and posted on iLearn. Your essay should demonstrate wide reading and in-depth critical analysis. You are expected to draw upon the weekly readings that relate to your chosen essay topic as well as other relevant academic sources.

Marking Criteria

  • Understanding and critical engagement with key readings in the unit
  • Comparison and analysis of key concepts in the unit
  • Critical analysis of relevant film/s
  • Independent research within the discipline
  • Use of research and reading to support the argument
  • Organisation of argument including clear addressing of the question
  • Clarity of communication
  • Accurate and appropriate referencing

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  • Develop an expansive historical knowledge of film theory.
  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Demonstrate skills in independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form

Film Log

Due: 5pm Friday 3rd June
Weighting: 20%

The film log takes the form of five brief (250 word entries). You need to write an entry for a film from each of the four modules (e.g. one entry on a film from Module: Key Terms Wk 1-4, one from a film shown in Module Two: Politics of Representation Wk 5-7, one from Module: Non-Fiction Wk 8-9 and one from Module: Canons & Auteurs Wk 10-13). The fifth entry can be on any film from throughout the unit, however none of the entries should be on a film discussed in your two essays.

 

Each entry should consider one or two issues, of your choosing, raised by the week’s readings in relation to the film. The entry should not recount the film or the reading but should offer a concise critical analysis.

 

 

Marking Criteria

  • Understanding of key themes, ideas and concepts in theories of film
  • Comparison and analysis of key concepts in the unit
  • Ability to interpret and discuss film form
  • Attention to themes, genres, form, or cultural context of specific films
  • Use of readings to support claims
  • Organisation of film log, including at least five entries with an entry from each of the four modules (with none of the entries replicating topics covered in essay one or essay two).
  • Clarity of communication
  • Accurate and appropriate referencing

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  • Develop an expansive historical knowledge of film theory.
  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Demonstrate skills in independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form

Delivery and Resources

CLASSES

Screenings: Fridays, 9am-11am, Y3A T1

Lectures: 11am-12pm, Y3A T1

Tutorials: For tutorial times and classrooms please consult the MQ Timetable website: https://timetables.mq.edu.au/2016/. This website will display up-to-date information on your classes and classroom locations.

Please note, you must attend the tutorial you are enrolled in. If you wish to change your tutorial time you can do so via e-student. Your tutor/lecturer will not be able to change your tutorial enrolment.

Tutorials begin in Week Two.

ATTENDANCE

Students are required to attend a screening, a one hour lecture and a one hour tutorial every week.

Students are required to prepare for tutorials by having attended the lecture and screening and having done the week’s readings and prepared questions and notes.

REQUIRED READING

Required readings will be available through iShare on the Library website.

RECOMMENDED READING

There is a list of further recommended reading and viewing for each topic - please refer to iLearn.

TECHNOLOGIES USED AND REQUIRED

Lectures will be recorded and available on iLearn. Details on readings, assessments and screenings will be available on iLearn. Students are expected to regularly check iLearn and their MQ email addresses for announcements.

ASSESSMENTS

You must complete all components of the unit in order to pass. Work submitted late without an extension approved by Ask.mq and the convener[s] including proof of illness or serious misadventure will incur a 5% penalty for each day after the due date, including weekends and holidays.

Assignment Submissions

All written work must be submitted to Turnitin, via the link on iLearn. Please make sure your full name, student number and tutor's name appears on the first page of your document. Please record your tutor's email address at the beginning of semester and questions about MAS205 should first be directed to your tutor. Students should ensure that they can receive emails sent to their MQ email address.

Unit Schedule

For detailed schedule including set and readings please refer to iLearn.

MODULE ONE: KEY TERMS

Week 1: Introduction to MAS205, Film and its Contexts (no tutorial)

Sunset Blvd. (Billy Wilder: 1950: USA: 110mins)

Week 2: Film and Narrative (tutorials begin)

Fargo (Joel Coen: 1996: USA: 98mins)

Week 3: Film and Genre

Forbidden Planet  (Fred M. Wilcox: 1956: USA: 98mins)

 

Week 4: Unit Research & Reading Week [Good Friday]

 

MODULE TWO: NON-FICTION FILM, REALITY & THE REAL

Week 5: Modes of Documentary

The Thin Blue Line (Errol Morris: 1988: USA: 103mins)

Week 6: Diary Films and Autobiography

Tarnation (Jonathon Caouette: 2003: USA: 88mins)

 

- Mid Semester Break -

 

MODULE THREE: POLITICS OF REPESENTATION

Week 7: Australian Contexts

Samson & Delilah (Warwick Thornton: 2009: Australia: 100mins)

Week 8: History and Memory

Cache (Michael Haneke, 2005; France, 117 mins)

Week 9: Feminism and Gender

Orlando (Sally Potter: 1992: UK: 94mins)

 

 

MODULE FOUR: CANONS & AUTEURS

Week 10: Critiquing Canons

Citizen Kane (Orson Welles: 1941: USA: 119mins)

Week 11: French New Wave

 À bout de souffle (Breathless) (Jean-Luc Godard: 1960: France: 90mins)

Week 12: Hong Kong CInema

Chung Hing sam lam (Chungking Express) (Wong Kar Wai: 1994: Hong Kong: 98mins)

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

New Assessment Policy in effect from Session 2 2016 http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html. For more information visit http://students.mq.edu.au/events/2016/07/19/new_assessment_policy_in_place_from_session_2/

Assessment Policy prior to Session 2 2016 http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy.html

Grading Policy prior to Session 2 2016 http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/grading/policy.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Additional information

MMCCS website https://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/faculties_and_departments/faculty_of_arts/department_of_media_music_communication_and_cultural_studies/

MMCCS Session Re-mark Application http://www.mq.edu.au/pubstatic/public/download/?id=167914

Information is correct at the time of publication

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  • Develop an expansive historical knowledge of film theory.
  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Demonstrate skills in independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Unit Reading Analysis
  • Short Essay
  • Essay
  • Film Log

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  • Develop an expansive historical knowledge of film theory.
  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Demonstrate skills in independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Unit Reading Analysis
  • Short Essay
  • Essay
  • Film Log

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Demonstrate skills in independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Unit Reading Analysis
  • Short Essay
  • Essay
  • Film Log

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.

Assessment tasks

  • Unit Reading Analysis
  • Short Essay
  • Essay
  • Film Log

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Unit Reading Analysis
  • Short Essay
  • Essay
  • Film Log

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment task

  • Short Essay

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment task

  • Short Essay

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Unit Reading Analysis
  • Short Essay
  • Essay
  • Film Log

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  • Develop an expansive historical knowledge of film theory.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.

Assessment tasks

  • Participation
  • Unit Reading Analysis
  • Short Essay
  • Essay
  • Film Log