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MECO830 – Creative Entrepreneurship

2016 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor/Lecturer
Kathryn Millard
Contact via kathryn.millard@mq.edu.au
Y3A 157
To be Advised in Week 1
Lecturer
Guy Morrow
Contact via guy.morrow@mq.edu.au
Y3A193E
To be advised in Week 1
Guy Morrow
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MCrMedia or MCrInd or MFJ
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit examines collaborative modes of production and models of entrepreneurship for creative media through critical readings and the study of in-depth case-studies. It considers models from artist-run spaces and studios through to creative industry practices.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Analyse a range of practices in creative entrepreneurship
  2. Synthesise critical and creative approaches to contemporary issues in creative media and future journalism collaboration practices
  3. Present a proposal for a creative media or future journalism project, product or service
  4. Apply creativity techniques at both an individual and a group level, including the use of idea generation techniques
  5. Identify the major themes, issues and debates relating to entrepreneurship in the creative and media industries

General Assessment Information

Late Submission

Tasks 10% or less. No extensions will be granted. Students who have not submitted the task prior to the deadline will be awarded a mark of 0 for the task, except for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

Tasks above 10%. Students who submit late work without an extension will receive a penalty of 10% per day. This penalty does not apply for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Creative Start-Ups Dossier 30% Week 5
Demo Day 60% Week 8
Participation 10% Weeks 2-8

Creative Start-Ups Dossier

Due: Week 5
Weighting: 30%

Assessment Outline

Please write up weekly  Creative Start-Ups Dossier from Weeks  1 to 5.  Each entry should be approximately  300 words plus annotated links. The Dossier can be submitted as a digital dossier, blog, written report - whatever suits your particular contribution best. 

Assessment Criteria

  • Evidence of research in its field of creative media
  • Level of  critical reflection on your own and other's work
  • Clarity of expression
  • Level of presentation

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Analyse a range of practices in creative entrepreneurship
  • Apply creativity techniques at both an individual and a group level, including the use of idea generation techniques
  • Identify the major themes, issues and debates relating to entrepreneurship in the creative and media industries

Demo Day

Due: Week 8
Weighting: 60%

Assessment Outline

This is a group assignment with an additional individual component.  

As a group, make a  presentation to the seminar on your idea for a  new project, product or service in the field of future journalism or creative media and field questions. Please incorporate support materials ( video trailers, recordings, slides, prototypes) as appropriate.  

Individually, please write up a 1000 word account  reflecting on your contribution to the group project. What were some of the challenges and opportunities involved in  developing your idea and working collaboratively?

Assessment Criteria

Group (30%)

Evidence that your Start-Up Idea combines ideas from more than one field

Level of innovation

Evidence of openness to group skills, resources, contacts and opportunities

Organisation and flow of group presentation

Individual (30%)

Evidence of reflection on key concepts in creative entrepreneurship and start-up thinking.

Analysis of creativity techniques utilised in developing the Start-Up idea. 

Awareness of collaborative dynamics in Start-Up project team. 

 

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Synthesise critical and creative approaches to contemporary issues in creative media and future journalism collaboration practices
  • Present a proposal for a creative media or future journalism project, product or service
  • Apply creativity techniques at both an individual and a group level, including the use of idea generation techniques
  • Identify the major themes, issues and debates relating to entrepreneurship in the creative and media industries

Participation

Due: Weeks 2-8
Weighting: 10%

Assessment Criteria

Actively contribute to seminars via

  •  contribution to seminars  based on preparation and reading identified in Unit Guide    
  • contributions to to discussions in seminars 
  • sharing of information and resources 
  • feedback on other students' work 

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Analyse a range of practices in creative entrepreneurship
  • Synthesise critical and creative approaches to contemporary issues in creative media and future journalism collaboration practices
  • Present a proposal for a creative media or future journalism project, product or service
  • Apply creativity techniques at both an individual and a group level, including the use of idea generation techniques
  • Identify the major themes, issues and debates relating to entrepreneurship in the creative and media industries

Delivery and Resources

Delivery Mode

Day

Seminar Times

Wednesday 2.00-5.00 p.m. Weeks 1-8 of semester. Please check the dates at MQ timetables site https://timetables.mq.edu.au/2016/

Technologies

This unit requires the use of a computer. 

Required Readings

Required readings are listed in the unit schedule under each week.   They will be available electronically via e-reserve and via links at the unit learn site from the start of semester. 

Recommended Readings

Given the emphasis on creative production, recommended readings will often be in the form of links to key websites or on-line productions and resources.  These links will be available at the iLearn site for this unit. 

 

 

 

Unit Schedule

Unit Schedule

This unit examines models of entrepreneurship for creative media.  It considers models from artist-run spaces and projects through to creative and media industries' start-ups.  We will ask: Is a creative media career a start-up?   Is a journalist's career a start-up?  How do you kick-start  projects?  How can careers in the creative arts and media be sustainable? 

Each seminar will include

  •  a student-led  presentation and discussion about a key aspect of creative entrepreneurship based on assigned readings and field research 
  • group work related to  ideas generation,  creative processes and the development of your own start-up ideas 

 Week 1 

 Introduction

What do you need to know about creative entrepreneurship as a journalist, blogger, musician, indie filmmaker, recording engineer, creative curator or screenwriter working in the digital economy? What is the ‘start-up’ mindset? How are new projects and ventures launched? How can you develop a sustainable career in your field?

Group work -  creative idea generation exercises (Sawyer). 

Reading

Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1997) 'The Flow of Creativity' in Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Invention', New York: Harper Collins, pp. 107-126 

Grant, A.  (2015)  Originals: How Nonconformists Change the World, New York: WH Allen, pp. 29-61

 Week 2 

 The Lean Start-Up

 Eric Reiss defines a start-up as ‘an organisation dedicated to creating something new under conditions of extreme uncertainty.’  New creative enterprises are essentially start-ups. What are some of the ways to maximise their success?  How could you design an MVP (Minimum Viable Product) for your new venture?

Reading

 http://www.startuplessonslearned.com

Reiss E. (2011) ‘The Lean Start-up’ pp. 28-69

Kolb, B.   (2015) 'Finding your entrepreneurial vision' in Entrepreneurship for the Creative and Cultural Industries, Oxon: Routledge, pp. 1-20

Group work - entrepreneurial vision exercises (Kolb)

Individual preparation for Week 3: Inspiring start-ups. Track down an example of  an inspiring start-up in your field (future journalism, screen or music production). What is the project, product or service? What need does it address? How did it get off the ground?  What resources did the founders have available? What were some of the challenges they faced?

Week 3 

 How to Get Ideas for Start-Ups

We will look at some thoughts on how you might ideas for new start-ups – projects, products or services. Saras Sarasvathy did extensive research on  the practices expert entrepreneurs and came up with an approach she calls effectuation. Paul Graham, one of the founders of the Y Combinator Lab suggests, for example, starting with problems that need solutions.  In this seminar, we will discuss these ideas and consider how you might apply them to generating ideas for this semester’s  ‘hands on’ project.

Readings

Amabile T.  'How to Kill Creativity', Harvard Business Review, Vol. 76, pp. 77-87

Sarasvathy S. (2008) Effectuation: Elements of Entrepreneurial Expertise, Northampton, UK: Edward Elgar, pp. 2-18 

 http://paulgraham.com/startupideas.html

Group work:  generating ideas for start-ups exercises

 Week 4 

 Collaboration

 Across journalism, screen media, music, performance, design and architecture, practitioners are getting together to form self-managed collectives, ateliers or studios to do projects.  Some focus on one art form or media. Others cross several media.  We will look at some examples. Plus, we will consider the dynamics of collaboration in the creative arts.  What are some of the roles  that creatives can fulfil in multidisciplinary teams? 

  Amabile T. et al  (2014) 'IDEO's Culture of Helping', Harvard Business Review, January-February pp. 53-61

  Kolb B. (2015)  'Making the dream a reality' in Entrepreneurship for the Cultural and Creative Industries pp. 29-40

 Sawyer, K. (2007), Group Genius: The Creative Power of Collaboration, New York: Basic Books: 3-57.

Group work -  recombinant creativity and collaborative  projects exercises.  (Sawyer and Kolb). 

 Week 5 

 Rapid Iteration: Prototypes, Demos and Scenarios

Prototyping, experimenting and rapid iteration play a critical role in the development of ideas and products. Failure – when designed to occur early in a process and cheaply – can reveal new options that nearly always lead to better outcomes. We will consider a number of approaches to prototyping and scenario building.

 Catmull, Ed (2008), 'How Pixar Fosters Collective Creativity', Harvard Business Review, Vol. 86, pp. 64-72

Alexander Osterwalder (2010) Business Model Generation pp. 146-169

Group work -  design thinking exercises (IDEO). 

Individual preparation for Week 6.  Compelling pitch. Find a compelling pitch on kickstarter or another site. Why does it work?  

Week 6

Crowdsourcing

‘Crowdsourcing’ is an online, distributed problem solving and production model that leverages the collective intelligence of online communities for the specific purposes of an organization. It combines a bottom-up, open, creative process with top-down organizational goals. Creative media has been at the forefront of crowdsourcing, drawing on it to fund films, recordings, productions and new products.

 Jennifer Fox ‘The First Six Tips for Generating a Six Figure Kickstarter Campaign’ http://hopeforfilm.com/?p=6973

 ‘The Cosmonaut: A Film Made By More than 5,000 People’ 

http://en.cosmonautexperience.com

Group work:  generate  questions for Demo Day presentations. 

Week 7 

Beta Day: Work-in-progress on Demo Day presentations

 Group workWhat are the advantages of telling an engaging story about your new creative venture via a talk, a trailer, a comic strip or words and images?  We’ll ask your team to devise a story about your venture. 

SEMESTER BREAK AND  ONGOING DEVELOPMENT OF TEAM START-UP IDEAS

 Week 8

 Demo Day

Formal Presentation of student projects and feedback

 

 

 

 

 

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

New Assessment Policy in effect from Session 2 2016 http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html. For more information visit http://students.mq.edu.au/events/2016/07/19/new_assessment_policy_in_place_from_session_2/

Assessment Policy prior to Session 2 2016 http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy.html

Grading Policy prior to Session 2 2016 http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/grading/policy.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Additional information

MMCCS website https://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/faculties_and_departments/faculty_of_arts/department_of_media_music_communication_and_cultural_studies/

MMCCS Session Re-mark Application http://www.mq.edu.au/pubstatic/public/download/?id=167914

Information is correct at the time of publication

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyse a range of practices in creative entrepreneurship
  • Present a proposal for a creative media or future journalism project, product or service
  • Apply creativity techniques at both an individual and a group level, including the use of idea generation techniques
  • Identify the major themes, issues and debates relating to entrepreneurship in the creative and media industries

Assessment tasks

  • Demo Day
  • Participation

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyse a range of practices in creative entrepreneurship
  • Synthesise critical and creative approaches to contemporary issues in creative media and future journalism collaboration practices
  • Present a proposal for a creative media or future journalism project, product or service
  • Apply creativity techniques at both an individual and a group level, including the use of idea generation techniques
  • Identify the major themes, issues and debates relating to entrepreneurship in the creative and media industries

Assessment tasks

  • Creative Start-Ups Dossier
  • Demo Day
  • Participation

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyse a range of practices in creative entrepreneurship
  • Synthesise critical and creative approaches to contemporary issues in creative media and future journalism collaboration practices
  • Apply creativity techniques at both an individual and a group level, including the use of idea generation techniques

Assessment tasks

  • Creative Start-Ups Dossier
  • Demo Day
  • Participation

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyse a range of practices in creative entrepreneurship
  • Synthesise critical and creative approaches to contemporary issues in creative media and future journalism collaboration practices
  • Apply creativity techniques at both an individual and a group level, including the use of idea generation techniques
  • Identify the major themes, issues and debates relating to entrepreneurship in the creative and media industries

Assessment tasks

  • Demo Day
  • Participation

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Present a proposal for a creative media or future journalism project, product or service

Assessment task

  • Demo Day

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Synthesise critical and creative approaches to contemporary issues in creative media and future journalism collaboration practices
  • Identify the major themes, issues and debates relating to entrepreneurship in the creative and media industries

Assessment tasks

  • Creative Start-Ups Dossier
  • Demo Day

Changes from Previous Offering

In semester 2, 2016 this course places a greater emphasis on group work  and collaboration as a key element of both seminars and assignments. 

This is in response to both convenors' and students'  observations of how the most innovative lean start-up ideas have been produced to date in previous offerings of this course.