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ABST302 – Indigenous Research Matters

2017 – S2 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Lecturer
Corrinne Sullivan
Contact via Email
W3A room 407
Monday 9am-11am
Credit points Credit points
6
Prerequisites Prerequisites
39cp at 100 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
ANTH305 or EDUC388 or ENVG340 or LAW468 or GEOP340
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This project-based research unit builds on the ideas and experiences developed in previous units. Students will plan, develop and complete an individual research project. The unit will examine issues for research involving Indigenous peoples including historical legacies of research and developments in research with Indigenous peoples today; the role of Indigenous and non-Indigenous researchers; and the role of de-colonising methods of research to advocate an Indigenous research agenda. In particular it concentrates on the ethical dimensions and operational issues of preparation for academic research in the social sciences, with particular reference to Indigenous settings and concerns. This unit uses the current Macquarie University Ethics Approval Process and is informed by NHMRC, AIATSIS and relevant international sources

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Recognise the historical legacies of research and subsequent effects on research practices with Indigenous peoples today.
  2. Justify your role as an Indigenous or non-Indigenous researcher or practitioner undertaking research or work with Indigenous communities.
  3. Explain the principles of a range of Indigenous Research Methodologies appropriate for application in research with Indigenous peoples
  4. Apply appropriate Indigenous Studies theoretical frameworks to resolve a range of ethical problems in Indigenous research.
  5. Critically reflect on current issues in Indigenous affairs and develop a proposal for small research project to address the problem.
  6. Interpret and communicate the principles of current Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies guidelines to Indigenous community and professional audiences.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Article Review 10% Friday 18th August
Research Proposal 20% Friday 1st September
Research Presentation 20% Sunday 8th October
Research Project 50% Friday 10th November

Article Review

Due: Friday 18th August
Weighting: 10%

Students will self-select ONE academic journal article that is relevant to their research project. Provide a maximum 2 pages using the template available on ilearn.

The criteria and standards by which your work will be assessed will be available in the ilearn site.

LATE SUBMISSIONS LOSE ONE MARK PER DAY.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain the principles of a range of Indigenous Research Methodologies appropriate for application in research with Indigenous peoples

Research Proposal

Due: Friday 1st September
Weighting: 20%

The research proposal is an integral component to all research projects. Designing your research provides an avenue for you to unpack your ideas and identify areas where there may be gaps in terms of understanding and development. In short, the research proposal is a means of planning and structuring your research.

In your 1000 word research proposal you will need to demonstrate that you have a good understanding of what it is that you intend to research and most importantly – how you intend to go about it.

A detailed template and marking rubric will be placed on ilearn.

LATE SUBMISSIONS LOSE ONE MARK PER DAY.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Recognise the historical legacies of research and subsequent effects on research practices with Indigenous peoples today.
  • Justify your role as an Indigenous or non-Indigenous researcher or practitioner undertaking research or work with Indigenous communities.
  • Explain the principles of a range of Indigenous Research Methodologies appropriate for application in research with Indigenous peoples
  • Interpret and communicate the principles of current Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies guidelines to Indigenous community and professional audiences.

Research Presentation

Due: Sunday 8th October
Weighting: 20%

A key element of research is disseminating information. The research presentation provides an opportunity for students to communicate their research ideas to an audience and receive feedback on the plans from fellow students and academic staff.

Students are required to each provide a 20 minute presentation on their Research Project. And will be required to answer questions on their project/presentation.

External students are required to post their presentation slides, and script to ilearn. Further students will need to post these to the ilearn site for other students to ask questions and engage with each others projects.

Further information in relation to the presentation will be uploaded to ilearn.

LATE SUBMISSIONS LOSE ONE MARK PER DAY.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Recognise the historical legacies of research and subsequent effects on research practices with Indigenous peoples today.
  • Justify your role as an Indigenous or non-Indigenous researcher or practitioner undertaking research or work with Indigenous communities.
  • Explain the principles of a range of Indigenous Research Methodologies appropriate for application in research with Indigenous peoples
  • Apply appropriate Indigenous Studies theoretical frameworks to resolve a range of ethical problems in Indigenous research.
  • Critically reflect on current issues in Indigenous affairs and develop a proposal for small research project to address the problem.
  • Interpret and communicate the principles of current Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies guidelines to Indigenous community and professional audiences.

Research Project

Due: Friday 10th November
Weighting: 50%

This assessment task requires students to undertake a 5,000 - 6,000 word research project in an area that is of interest. Ultimately the choice of topic is up to you, though it is important to discuss your topic with the unit convenor. Your research proposal and research presentation will assist you in the development of the project.

Further information, including the criteria and standards by which your work will be assessed will be available in the ilearn site 

LATE SUBMISSIONS LOSE ONE MARK PER DAY.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Recognise the historical legacies of research and subsequent effects on research practices with Indigenous peoples today.
  • Justify your role as an Indigenous or non-Indigenous researcher or practitioner undertaking research or work with Indigenous communities.
  • Apply appropriate Indigenous Studies theoretical frameworks to resolve a range of ethical problems in Indigenous research.
  • Critically reflect on current issues in Indigenous affairs and develop a proposal for small research project to address the problem.

Delivery and Resources

Readings for this unit are also listed in iLearn under each week. They will all be available online through the Macquarie University library. 

Week 2

  • Martin Nakata. “Australian Indigenous Studies: A Question of Discipline.” The Australian Journal of Anthropology. 17.3: 2006.
  • Martin Nakata et al. "Decolonial goals and pedagogies for Indigenous studies." Decolonization : indigeneity, education & society. 1.1: 2012.
  • Chadwick Allen. "Rere Ke/Moving Differently: Indigenizing Methodologies for Comparative Indigenous Literary Studies." Journal of New Zealand Literature. 24.2: 2007.
  • Chris Andersen. "Critical Indigenous Studies: From difference to density." Cultural Studies Review. 15.2: 2009.
  • Deborah McGregor. "Coming full circle: Indigenous knowledge, environment, and our future." American Indian Quarterly. 28.3/4: 2004.
  • Reilly, M P J. 'Māori Studies, Past and Present: A Review'. The Contemporary Pacific. 23.2: 2011.
  • Robert Warrior. “Native American Scholarship and the transnational turn”. Cultural Studies Review. 15.2: 2009.
  • Kavelin, Chris. Universities as the Gatekeepers of the Intellectual Property of Indigenous People's Medical Knowledge. The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education. 37: 2008.

Week 3

  • Martin Nakata et al. "Decolonial goals and pedagogies for Indigenous studies." Decolonization : indigeneity, education & society. 1.1: 2012.
  • Chadwick Allen. "Rere Ke/Moving Differently: Indigenizing Methodologies for Comparative Indigenous Literary Studies." Journal of New Zealand Literature. 24.2: 2007.
  • Chris Andersen. "Critical Indigenous Studies: From difference to density." Cultural Studies Review. 15.2: 2009.
  • Deborah McGregor. "Coming full circle: Indigenous knowledge, environment, and our future." American Indian Quarterly. 28.3/4: 2004.
  • Robert Warrior. “Native American Scholarship and the transnational turn”. Cultural Studies Review. 15.2: 2009.
  • Lester-Irabinna Rigney. "Internationalization of an Indigenous Anticolonial Cultural Critique of Research Methodologies: A Guide to Indigenist Research Methodology and Its Principles" Wicazo Sa Review, 1 October 1999, Vol.14(2), pp.109-121

  • Jelena Porsanger. "An Essay about Indigenous Methodology" Nordlit : Tidsskrift i litteratur og kultur , Vol 8, Iss 1, Pp 105-120 (2004)

 

Week 4

AIATSIS - Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies

http://aiatsis.gov.au/research/ethical-research/guidelines-ethical-research-australian-indigenous-studies

UNDRIP

https://www.humanrights.gov.au/publications/un-declaration-rights-indigenous-peoples-1

 

Gail Dana-Sacco. "The Indigenous Researcher as Individual and Collective." American Indian Quarterly. 34 (1) 2010: 61-82.

David Hough. "Decolonizing the agenda: a preliminary critique of Non-Native Indigenous Research." 湘南工科大学紀要. 46. 2012: 61-72.

[Don't freak out about the title of this journal; just look up the article's title through MQ library and you'll be able to click through to the article.]

 

Week 5

Please note the books required for the book report due 7 September:

  • Karen Martin Please knock before you enter (2008)
  • Shawn Wilson Research is ceremony (2009)
  • Martin Nakata Disciplining the savages; savaging the disciplines (2007)
  • Linda Tuhiwai Smith Decolonizing methodologies (2nd ed; 2012)
  • Castejon, Cole, Haag, Hughes Ngapartji, Ngapartji: In turn, in turn (2014)

Each student will only read ONE of these books each. However, it is your responsibility to source the book you are reading. We will decide on who will read which book by the end of week two.

 

Week 6

No new reading

 

Week 7

No new reading

 

Week 8

The readings for week 8 will be determined by the class during week 7 - each student will nominate one article relevant to their research interests.

 

Week 9

For week 9 we will look at four online sources of information:

Glen Coulthard  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6NdQwJyT1U

Maile Arvin  https://mailevine.wordpress.com/2014/06/27/following-the-public-hearings-on-native-hawaiian-federal-recognition/

Information about Alaskan example  https://tm112.community.uaf.edu/unit-4/federal-recognition-of-alaska-tribes-and-relations-with-the-state-of-alaska/

Australian Recognise campaign website   http://www.recognise.org.au/

Also recommended - http://www.civilbeat.org/2014/06/kanaka-maoli-to-feds-get-out-of-our-house-go-home/ and Glen Coulthard's book Red Skin White Masks: rejecting the colonial politics of recognition.

Week 10

No new reading (work in progress presentations)

Week 11

No new reading (in-class film and discussion)

Week 12

No new reading

Week 13

No new reading

 

EXT students - additional information about unit delivery

This unit is offered online for EXT students and access to the internet and a computer are essential (mobile technology such as an iphone or ipad are not sufficient for this course). 

Online units can be accessed at: https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/login/MQ/

For technical support with passwords or to check if the Learning Management System (LMS) is down, go tohttp://informatics.mq.edu.au/help/

For basic training in how to use the LMS, please go to http://mq.edu.au/iLearn/student_info/index.htm

For Learning & Teaching issues e.g. how to access your online materials such as readings, i-lecture, please contact the Unit Convenor.

 

Unit Schedule

Weekly Lectorial Schedule ABST 302 Indigenous Research Matters

Semester Two 2017

W5A 204 Monday 2pm-5pm

Lecture 1 

31st July

Overview of unit and discussion about research ideas_ Professor Bronwyn Carlson

Lecture 2

 7th August

Development of Research Proposals

Reading and Writing in Indigenous Studies

Lecture 3

14th August

The Researcher/Writing a Literature Review

Lecture 4 

21st August

Indigenous Research Theory and Methodologies

 

Lecture 5

28th August

Peer review

Lecture 6

4th September

Ethical Research/Historical and Contemporary Legacies of Research

Lecture 7

11th September

Independent research – No lecture

 

Mid-Semester Break

 

Lecture 8

2nd October

PUBLIC HOLIDAY – NO LECTURE/TUTORIALS.

Lecture 9

9th October

Presentations

Lecture 10

16th October

Presentations

Lecture11 

23rd October

Independent Research

Lecture 12

30th  October

Peer Review and feedback

Lecture 13

6th November

Independent Research

 

 

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Recognise the historical legacies of research and subsequent effects on research practices with Indigenous peoples today.
  • Explain the principles of a range of Indigenous Research Methodologies appropriate for application in research with Indigenous peoples
  • Apply appropriate Indigenous Studies theoretical frameworks to resolve a range of ethical problems in Indigenous research.

Assessment tasks

  • Article Review
  • Research Proposal
  • Research Presentation
  • Research Project

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Recognise the historical legacies of research and subsequent effects on research practices with Indigenous peoples today.
  • Explain the principles of a range of Indigenous Research Methodologies appropriate for application in research with Indigenous peoples
  • Apply appropriate Indigenous Studies theoretical frameworks to resolve a range of ethical problems in Indigenous research.
  • Critically reflect on current issues in Indigenous affairs and develop a proposal for small research project to address the problem.

Assessment tasks

  • Article Review
  • Research Proposal
  • Research Presentation
  • Research Project

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Explain the principles of a range of Indigenous Research Methodologies appropriate for application in research with Indigenous peoples
  • Apply appropriate Indigenous Studies theoretical frameworks to resolve a range of ethical problems in Indigenous research.
  • Critically reflect on current issues in Indigenous affairs and develop a proposal for small research project to address the problem.

Assessment tasks

  • Research Presentation
  • Research Project

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Justify your role as an Indigenous or non-Indigenous researcher or practitioner undertaking research or work with Indigenous communities.
  • Critically reflect on current issues in Indigenous affairs and develop a proposal for small research project to address the problem.
  • Interpret and communicate the principles of current Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies guidelines to Indigenous community and professional audiences.

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Apply appropriate Indigenous Studies theoretical frameworks to resolve a range of ethical problems in Indigenous research.
  • Critically reflect on current issues in Indigenous affairs and develop a proposal for small research project to address the problem.

Assessment tasks

  • Research Presentation
  • Research Project

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Explain the principles of a range of Indigenous Research Methodologies appropriate for application in research with Indigenous peoples
  • Apply appropriate Indigenous Studies theoretical frameworks to resolve a range of ethical problems in Indigenous research.
  • Critically reflect on current issues in Indigenous affairs and develop a proposal for small research project to address the problem.
  • Interpret and communicate the principles of current Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies guidelines to Indigenous community and professional audiences.

Assessment tasks

  • Research Proposal
  • Research Presentation
  • Research Project

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Justify your role as an Indigenous or non-Indigenous researcher or practitioner undertaking research or work with Indigenous communities.
  • Apply appropriate Indigenous Studies theoretical frameworks to resolve a range of ethical problems in Indigenous research.
  • Critically reflect on current issues in Indigenous affairs and develop a proposal for small research project to address the problem.
  • Interpret and communicate the principles of current Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies guidelines to Indigenous community and professional audiences.

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Recognise the historical legacies of research and subsequent effects on research practices with Indigenous peoples today.

Assessment tasks

  • Article Review
  • Research Proposal
  • Research Project

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Justify your role as an Indigenous or non-Indigenous researcher or practitioner undertaking research or work with Indigenous communities.
  • Interpret and communicate the principles of current Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies guidelines to Indigenous community and professional audiences.