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AHIS209 – Ancient Greek B

2017 – S2 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Ian Plant
Contact via ian.plant@mq.edu.au
W6A508
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
AHIS108 or AHIS208 or AHST205
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit is designed to follow AHIS108. A selection of graded Greek texts from a number of authors are studied to build skills in reading Greek. By the end of semester students read some unadapted Greek, eg by Euripides.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify and recall Greek grammatical structures at more advanced level
  2. Recognize and memorize extended Greek vocabulary
  3. Analyse the grammar required for the translation of Greek texts appropriate to level of study
  4. Explore and appraise relevant grammatical and lexical reference tools
  5. Employ linguistic metalanguage
  6. Integrate knowledge of grammar and vocabulary in reading and writing Greek texts
  7. Explore the significance of Greek for the study of relevant ancient cultures

General Assessment Information

Extensions and penalties for late assignments

 It is important to keep up with the weekly assignments. Your assignment must be completed on time. Without documentation (eg. medical certificate), a penalty of 2% a day (including weekends) will be applied. If you need an extension and have a valid reason you must apply online. See below for the procedure for this.

Disruption to Study  All work for this course must be submitted by the Friday of week thirteen, unless there are special circumstances (normally illness or serious misadventure) and unless an extension of time has been granted by the Unit Convenor. The granting of an extension of time requires the approval of disruption to study. You must apply online. Do not email the unit convenor or your tutor directly. Go to: http://www.arts.mq.edu.au/current_students/undergraduate    Online Quizzes  At 9pm on the Friday of week 13 the access to the quizzes will close and no further attempts will be possible. No extensions of time are possible. You may complete the quizzes at any time in the semester before this date.    Grade Appeals  A Grade Appeal can only be lodged on specific grounds. Please ensure you understand these grounds clearly before submitting any application. A grade appeal may be made on the final result only, not on results received for individual assessment tasks. For more information and for the link to make an appeal go to:  http://www.arts.mq.edu.au/current_students/undergraduate 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Translation 40% Each week: Friday 9pm
Vocabulary Tests 10% Week 13: Friday 9pm
Final Examination 50% MQ Exam Period

Translation

Due: Each week: Friday 9pm
Weighting: 40%

Weekly exercises to practise vocabulary, grammar and syntax knowledge. The exercises come from the unit textbook. There is a separate schedule of the exercises for assessment on the unit's website. Some require translation from Ancient Greek, some into Ancient Greek. You do not need to submit all the exercises in the textbook--just the ones listed in the assessment schedule.

Weekly assignments are submitted by uploading your document (eg .doc or pdf) to ilearn. For instructions on how to do this, see below: iLearn Assignment Upload Procedure


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify and recall Greek grammatical structures at more advanced level
  • Recognize and memorize extended Greek vocabulary
  • Analyse the grammar required for the translation of Greek texts appropriate to level of study
  • Explore and appraise relevant grammatical and lexical reference tools
  • Integrate knowledge of grammar and vocabulary in reading and writing Greek texts
  • Explore the significance of Greek for the study of relevant ancient cultures

Vocabulary Tests

Due: Week 13: Friday 9pm
Weighting: 10%

These are short quizzes on the vocabulary and paradigms covered in the course, set chapter by chapter. There are some short questions on grammar too. The quizzes may be attempted at any time before they close: Friday of week 13 at 9pm. It will not be possible to attempt them after that time. I strongly advise you not to leave your attempts at the quizzes until the final week!

The quizzes are attempted online. Click on the Quizzes link in the blue Activities box to find them. Please note: you are only allowed one attempt at each quiz.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify and recall Greek grammatical structures at more advanced level
  • Recognize and memorize extended Greek vocabulary

Final Examination

Due: MQ Exam Period
Weighting: 50%

This will examine knowledge of grammar, syntax and vocabulary. Sample examinations from previous years will be provided on the unit website. You may take your textbook (An Introduction to Ancient Greek: A Literary Approach by C.A.E. Luschnig, revised by C.A.E. Luschnig & Deborah Mitchell Second Edition (Hackett: Indianapolis & Cambridge, 2007)) into the examination room. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify and recall Greek grammatical structures at more advanced level
  • Recognize and memorize extended Greek vocabulary
  • Analyse the grammar required for the translation of Greek texts appropriate to level of study
  • Employ linguistic metalanguage
  • Integrate knowledge of grammar and vocabulary in reading and writing Greek texts

Delivery and Resources

Delivery: Internal (Day) and External. This unit will use live lectures, ECHO recordings, ilearn website and ZOOM (live web-class).

Lectures: Please see the Timetable for the scheduled classes. All lectures are recorded by the ECHO system.

ilearn: The unit's webpage may be accessed via: https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/. Students are required to have regular access to a computer and the internet. Mobile devices alone are not sufficient. - For technical support go to: http://mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/informatics/help - For student quick guides on the use of iLearn go to: http://mq.edu.au/iLearn/student_info/guides.htm

ZOOM: This provides a live web link to the lectures. Students who are not in class are able to interact with the lecturer and class live via the internet. Students may participate by listening, watching texts being written and edited live, asking questions or answering questions. It will take a few moments to join each time (particularly the first time), so please login early if you want to join a session live. You need to JOIN the session through the link for the class on the unit webpage.

 

Textbook: This unit uses a textbook which is essential for classwork and weekly exercises: C.A.E. Luschnig, revised by C.A.E. Luschnig & Deborah Mitchell, An Introduction to Ancient Greek: A Literary Approach. Second Edition (Hackett: Indianapolis & Cambridge, 2007). This is available from the Co-op Bookshop. Please note that the second edition is substantially different from the first edition. I recommend that you acquire the hardcopy (ie paper) version of the textbook as you will be allowed to take this into the final examination. There is an electronic (pdf) version of the textbook available, but you will not be able to take this into the examination.

Unit Schedule

Unit schedule

Weeks

Lesson

Key Grammar

1-2

VII

Participles: Present, Future, Aorist

Active, Middle & Passive

3

VIII

Pronouns: Interrogative, Indefinite, Relative Indefinite, Reciprocal

Perfect Active

4-5

IX

Pronouns: Personal & Reflexive

Possessive Adjectives

Perfect Middle-Passive

6

X

Comparison of Adjectives

Adverbs

Aorist & Future Passive

7-8

XI

Contract Verbs

9-10

XII

-MI verbs

11-12

XIII

Subjunctive Mood

Optative Mood

Sequence of Moods & dependent clauses

13

XIV

Imperative

Vocative

Verbs in –TEOS and -TEON

Learning and Teaching Activities

Lectures

Discuss and explain Ancient Greek grammar and syntax. Review relevant examples, including original texts.

Translation Exercises

Practice in analysis, grammar and syntax, both into and from Ancient Greek. Formative feedback provided each week.

Quizzes

Timed tests of knowledge and the application of knowledge.

Examination

Reviews key learning, knowledge, skills and application of knowledge.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Integrate knowledge of grammar and vocabulary in reading and writing Greek texts

Assessment tasks

  • Translation
  • Final Examination

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Explore the significance of Greek for the study of relevant ancient cultures

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify and recall Greek grammatical structures at more advanced level
  • Recognize and memorize extended Greek vocabulary
  • Analyse the grammar required for the translation of Greek texts appropriate to level of study
  • Explore and appraise relevant grammatical and lexical reference tools
  • Employ linguistic metalanguage
  • Integrate knowledge of grammar and vocabulary in reading and writing Greek texts

Assessment tasks

  • Translation
  • Final Examination

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Employ linguistic metalanguage

Assessment tasks

  • Translation
  • Final Examination

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyse the grammar required for the translation of Greek texts appropriate to level of study
  • Explore and appraise relevant grammatical and lexical reference tools
  • Integrate knowledge of grammar and vocabulary in reading and writing Greek texts
  • Explore the significance of Greek for the study of relevant ancient cultures

Assessment tasks

  • Translation
  • Final Examination

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify and recall Greek grammatical structures at more advanced level
  • Recognize and memorize extended Greek vocabulary
  • Analyse the grammar required for the translation of Greek texts appropriate to level of study
  • Explore and appraise relevant grammatical and lexical reference tools
  • Employ linguistic metalanguage
  • Integrate knowledge of grammar and vocabulary in reading and writing Greek texts
  • Explore the significance of Greek for the study of relevant ancient cultures

Assessment tasks

  • Translation
  • Vocabulary Tests
  • Final Examination

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify and recall Greek grammatical structures at more advanced level
  • Recognize and memorize extended Greek vocabulary
  • Analyse the grammar required for the translation of Greek texts appropriate to level of study
  • Explore and appraise relevant grammatical and lexical reference tools
  • Employ linguistic metalanguage
  • Integrate knowledge of grammar and vocabulary in reading and writing Greek texts
  • Explore the significance of Greek for the study of relevant ancient cultures

Assessment tasks

  • Translation
  • Final Examination