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ABST100 – Introducing Indigenous Australia

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Corrinne Franklin
Contact via corrinne.franklin@mq.edu.au
W3A 407
Thursday 1pm-2pm
Bronwyn Carlson
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit offers a broad introduction to the history and cultures of Indigenous Australia from an Indigenous standpoint. Students in this unit will study the historical impact of British colonisation on Australia's first peoples and learn about the history of Indigenous political resistance centred on land, social justice, human rights and cultural identity. Students in this unit will also be introduced to the social, cultural and political outlook of contemporary Indigenous identity and explore the impact and influence of early colonialist race theory on contemporary representations of Indigenous identity. This unit presents as a thought provoking and challenging cultural experience of Indigenous Australian history, culture and worldview and as such provides a solid theoretical foundation for anyone wishing to pursue further Indigenous studies.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe the history of Indigenous Australia since British colonisation.
  2. Discuss the social, cultural and political issues that challenge contemporary Indigenous Australia.
  3. Explain contemporary Indigenous identity and Indigenous representations of Indigenous identity.
  4. Examine non-Indigenous constructions of Indigenous identity over time, including early colonialist race theory and its impact on contemporary representations of Indigenous identity.
  5. Explore societal misconceptions, ideas, attitudes and assumptions about Indigenous Australia.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Class participation 10% Ongoing
Online Quiz 5% Sunday 19th March
Essay 20% Monday 3rd April, 2017
Reflective Essay 25% Monday 8th May, 2017
Topic Analysis 40% Monday 5th June, 2017

Class participation

Due: Ongoing
Weighting: 10%

Student attendance and contributions will be assessed on an on-going basis.

This participation mark has two components:

*Class participation – attendance, reading, posing questions/identifying key themes.

*Class contribution – actively participating in classroom/online discussion.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Describe the history of Indigenous Australia since British colonisation.
  • Discuss the social, cultural and political issues that challenge contemporary Indigenous Australia.
  • Explain contemporary Indigenous identity and Indigenous representations of Indigenous identity.
  • Examine non-Indigenous constructions of Indigenous identity over time, including early colonialist race theory and its impact on contemporary representations of Indigenous identity.
  • Explore societal misconceptions, ideas, attitudes and assumptions about Indigenous Australia.

Online Quiz

Due: Sunday 19th March
Weighting: 5%

The questions in this quiz are derived from the first lecture and the Indigenous Terminology handout (located under weblinks on the unit ilearn page). Students have one attempt to get the answers correct. Time limit is 20 minutes.

No late submissions will be excepted.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain contemporary Indigenous identity and Indigenous representations of Indigenous identity.
  • Explore societal misconceptions, ideas, attitudes and assumptions about Indigenous Australia.

Essay

Due: Monday 3rd April, 2017
Weighting: 20%

Students will identify and discuss the local Indigenous Australian people of the land on which the student lives/works/or studies.

Further information about the assignment, including the criteria and standards by which your work will be assessed will be available in the ilearn site.

Please note that late submissions will incur a one mark per day penalty.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Describe the history of Indigenous Australia since British colonisation.
  • Discuss the social, cultural and political issues that challenge contemporary Indigenous Australia.
  • Explain contemporary Indigenous identity and Indigenous representations of Indigenous identity.
  • Examine non-Indigenous constructions of Indigenous identity over time, including early colonialist race theory and its impact on contemporary representations of Indigenous identity.
  • Explore societal misconceptions, ideas, attitudes and assumptions about Indigenous Australia.

Reflective Essay

Due: Monday 8th May, 2017
Weighting: 25%

Students will write a 1500 word reflective essay drawing from their journals that focus on their learning and findings of the topics (lectures, tutorial discussion/online forum) presented to date.

Further information about the assignment, including the criteria and standards by which your work will be assessed will be available in the ilearn site.

Please note that late submissions will incur a one mark per day penalty.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Describe the history of Indigenous Australia since British colonisation.
  • Discuss the social, cultural and political issues that challenge contemporary Indigenous Australia.
  • Explain contemporary Indigenous identity and Indigenous representations of Indigenous identity.
  • Examine non-Indigenous constructions of Indigenous identity over time, including early colonialist race theory and its impact on contemporary representations of Indigenous identity.
  • Explore societal misconceptions, ideas, attitudes and assumptions about Indigenous Australia.

Topic Analysis

Due: Monday 5th June, 2017
Weighting: 40%

Students will self-select 3 weekly topics and will critically engage with and draw upon those topics to discuss their relationship to Indigenous Australians.

Further information about the assignment, including the criteria and standards by which your work will be assessed will be available in the ilearn site.

Please note that late submissions will incur a one mark per day penalty.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Describe the history of Indigenous Australia since British colonisation.
  • Discuss the social, cultural and political issues that challenge contemporary Indigenous Australia.
  • Explain contemporary Indigenous identity and Indigenous representations of Indigenous identity.
  • Examine non-Indigenous constructions of Indigenous identity over time, including early colonialist race theory and its impact on contemporary representations of Indigenous identity.
  • Explore societal misconceptions, ideas, attitudes and assumptions about Indigenous Australia.

Delivery and Resources

Online units can be accessed at: http://ilearn.mq.edu.au/.

Students are to listen to all lectures and respond to the weekly question on ilearn.

PC and Internet access are required. Basic computer skills (e.g. internet browsing) and skills in word processing are also a requirement.

Please consult teaching staff for any further, more specific requirements.

Unit Schedule

Weekly Lecture Schedule ABST 100 Introduction to Indigenous Australia –

Semester One 2017

E7B Mason Theatre Friday 2-4pm

Lecture 1 

3rd March

Welcome to Indigenous Studies

Lecture 2

10th March

Reading and Writing in Indigenous Studies

Lecture 3

17th March

Who are Indigenous Australia: Identity

 

Lecture 4 

24th March

Indigenous People and the Media

Lecture 5

31st March

An historical timeline: colonisation to resistance

Lecture 6

7th April

Indigenous land and country 

Lecture 7

14th April

More than dots: Indigenous people and the Arts

 

 

Mid-Semester Break

 

Lecture 8

5th May

Indigenous people and the law: The Northern Territory Intervention or Stronger Futures?

Lecture 9

12th May

Indigenous Education

 

Lecture 10

19th May

Stolen Generations

Lecture11 

26th May

Race and Racism

Lecture 12

2nd June

Indigenous people and Health

Lecture 13

9th June

Indigenous Australia: Where to from here

 

Weekly Tutorial Schedule ABST 100 Introduction to Indigenous Australia – Semester One 2017

Week 1

No Tutorial

3rd March

NO TUTORIAL

Week 2

10th/13th

March

Tutorial Reading and Question:

Introduction and Assessment overview

 

What is Indigenous Studies?

 

Discuss three key points from the lecture ‘Reading and Writing in Indigenous Studies

Week 3

17th/20th

March

Tutorial Reading and Question:

Who are Indigenous? What is Indigenous?

 

Identify one great Indigenous Australian, and discuss what makes them great.

 

DODSON, M. 1994. The Wentworth lecture the end in the beginning: Re(de)finding [A]boriginality. Australian Aboriginal Studies, 2-13.

Week 4

24th/27th

March

Tutorial Reading and Question:

Students will name and discuss a recent news article. All students to locate their own news article from recent newspapers (Koori Mail, Sydney Morning Herald, Daily Telegraph etc). Internal students should bring a copy to their tutorial class, external students are to cite their news article for other students to locate and read.

 

How are Indigenous people represented by mainstream media?

Is Indigenous media (Koori Mail, NITV) empowering for Indigenous people, why?

 

BANERJEE, S. B. & OSURI, G. 2000. Silences of the media: whiting out Aboriginality in making news and making history. Media, Culture & Society, 22, 263-284.

Week 5

31st March

3rd April

Tutorial Reading and Question:

It has been claimed that the extent of Indigenous death through massacre has been greatly exaggerated (Windshuttle 2002). Do you think this aspect of Australia’s history is an inconvenient truth?  Why was Australia invaded?

What, in your opinion, was the greatest act of resistance by Indigenous Australia?

 

REYNOLDS, H. 2006. Resistance: Motives and Objectives. In: REYNOLDS, H. (ed.) The other side of the frontier: Aboriginal resistance to the European invasion of Australia. Sydney: UNSW Press.

Week 6

7th /10th

April

Tutorial Reading and Question:

What are the concerns about Aboriginal Australian Native title claims in Australia? Consider the pastoral (farming) and mining industries – who actually has control over ‘Aboriginal lands’?

Why is land important to Indigenous Australians?

 

SEIDEL, P. 2004. Native Title: The struggle for justice for the Yorta Yorta Nation. Alternative Law Journal, 29, 70-74

Week 7

14th  April

17th April

September

Tutorial Reading and Question:

Online Tutorial – Students need to watch ONE of the following films (Bran Nue Dae, Australian Rules, or Nice Coloured Girls) and respond to the following questions.

In what ways can film/television expose Indigenous ways of seeing history, social issues and life in general?

Choose one of the Indigenous characters your chosen film, and discuss the ways in which that character is portrayed.

 

GLOW, H. & JOHANSON, K. Your Genre is Black': Indigenous Performing Arts and Policy.  Platform Papers, 2009. Jan 2009, 1-66.

Mid-Semester Break

Week 8

5th /8th

May

Tutorial Reading and Question:

Discuss Gary Johns article on The Northern Territory Intervention in Aboriginal Affairs: ‘Wicked Problem or Wicked Policy’? What factors are at play?

 

 

JOHNS, G. 2008. The Northern Territory Intervention in Aboriginal Affairs: Wicked Problem or Wicked Policy? Agenda, 15, 65-84.

Week 9

12th/15th

May

Tutorial Reading and Question:

What strategies would you include in any educational setting (early childhood, primary, Secondary, tertiary) that could increase participation levels of Indigenous students?

 

RIGNEY, L.-I. 2011. Indigenous education and tomorrow's classroom: Three questions, three answers. In: PURDIE, N., MILGATE, G. & BELL, H. R. (eds.) Two way teaching and learning: Toward culturally reflective and relevant education. Victoria: ACER Press.

Week 10

19th/22nd

May

Tutorial Reading and Question:

The Stolen Generations had a deep impact on Indigenous Australia. How and why is this still affecting Indigenous Australia today?

Was the national apology effective?

 

Listen to more testimonies http://stolengenerationstestimonies.com/

 

READ, P. 1998. The return of the stolen generation. Journal of Australian Studies, 22, 8-19.

Week 11

26th/29th

May

Tutorial Reading and Question:

How or why are Indigenous Australians targeted for racism by Australian society?

 

MELLOR, D. 2003. Contemporary Racism in Australia: The Experiences of Aborigines. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 29, 474-486.

Week 12

2nd/5th

June

Tutorial Reading and Question:

What solutions can you argue that may improve basic health lifestyles for Aboriginal peoples in city/rural/remote locations? Can you identify some successful health programs?

 

PHOLI, K., BLACK, D. & RICHARDS, C. 2009. Is ‘Close the Gap’ a useful approach to improving the health and wellbeing of Indigenous Australians? Australian Review of Public Affairs, 2, 1-13.

Week 13

9th /12th June

NO TUTORIAL

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Support for Indigenous Australian students –

The University has an Indigenous Student Support Officer, who is able to provide social educational and personal support for all Indigenous students. For further information please contact (02) 9850 4209.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe the history of Indigenous Australia since British colonisation.
  • Discuss the social, cultural and political issues that challenge contemporary Indigenous Australia.
  • Explain contemporary Indigenous identity and Indigenous representations of Indigenous identity.
  • Examine non-Indigenous constructions of Indigenous identity over time, including early colonialist race theory and its impact on contemporary representations of Indigenous identity.

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation
  • Reflective Essay
  • Topic Analysis

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe the history of Indigenous Australia since British colonisation.
  • Discuss the social, cultural and political issues that challenge contemporary Indigenous Australia.
  • Explain contemporary Indigenous identity and Indigenous representations of Indigenous identity.
  • Examine non-Indigenous constructions of Indigenous identity over time, including early colonialist race theory and its impact on contemporary representations of Indigenous identity.
  • Explore societal misconceptions, ideas, attitudes and assumptions about Indigenous Australia.

Assessment tasks

  • Online Quiz
  • Reflective Essay
  • Topic Analysis

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Describe the history of Indigenous Australia since British colonisation.

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Explore societal misconceptions, ideas, attitudes and assumptions about Indigenous Australia.

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation
  • Reflective Essay
  • Topic Analysis

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe the history of Indigenous Australia since British colonisation.
  • Discuss the social, cultural and political issues that challenge contemporary Indigenous Australia.
  • Explain contemporary Indigenous identity and Indigenous representations of Indigenous identity.

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation
  • Essay
  • Reflective Essay
  • Topic Analysis

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe the history of Indigenous Australia since British colonisation.
  • Discuss the social, cultural and political issues that challenge contemporary Indigenous Australia.
  • Explain contemporary Indigenous identity and Indigenous representations of Indigenous identity.
  • Examine non-Indigenous constructions of Indigenous identity over time, including early colonialist race theory and its impact on contemporary representations of Indigenous identity.
  • Explore societal misconceptions, ideas, attitudes and assumptions about Indigenous Australia.

Assessment tasks

  • Class participation
  • Essay
  • Reflective Essay
  • Topic Analysis

Changes since First Published

Date Description
15/02/2017 Changes to dates for assessment submission