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AHIS140 – Myth in the Ancient World

2017 – S2 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Ian Plant
Contact via ian.plant@mq.edu.au
W6A508
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
Gain an understanding of Greek, Roman and Near-Eastern society and culture through the study of myth. You will begin with the earliest creation myths, examining the development of myth in literature and art. The unit is largely based upon Greek and Latin texts in translation as well as the representation of myth in art. Near-Eastern and biblical texts will also be studied. The unit focuses on the relevance of key themes in myth to the cultures in which the myths arose, investigating their roles in the religious, political and social life of the classical world.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. KU1 Recognize the fundamental concepts, principles and theories used in the study of myth.
  2. KU2 Apply knowledge and understanding of the essential facts, concepts, principles and theories used in the study of myth.
  3. KU3 Communicate effectively with teaching staff and peers
  4. KU4 Demonstrate an informed respect for professional (academic), ethical and sustainability principles and values
  5. S1 Conceptualize, apply, analyze, synthesize, and/or evaluate historical information about myth in the ancient world, gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication
  6. S2 Integrate a balance between knowledge of mythology, imagination (looking at ideas and concepts from meaningful original perspectives), and evaluation (employing critical thinking) as a foundation for creative learning behaviour
  7. S3 Demonstrate and utilize clear, coherent, evidence-based exposition of knowledge and ideas about myth in the ancient world.
  8. AKS1 Apply and model a wide variety of presentation methods
  9. AKS2 Utilize effectively research methods and tools in dialogue with staff and peers
  10. AKS3 Devise arguments and solve problems in studies related to myth in the ancient world
  11. AKS4 Consider and communicate critical and reflective judgements
  12. AKS5 Demonstrate historical knowledge (personalities, events, periods) and issues (ideologies, philosophies, traditions) according to intellectual, methodological, and/or ethical conventions used in the study of myth in the ancient world.

General Assessment Information

Extensions and penalties All due dates are firm. Permission to submit a late piece of work will only be granted in case of illness or other exceptional cases. Special approval for such late submissions must be sought in advance (where circumstances permit it). Late work will otherwise incur a penalty of 2% per day. Applications for special approval must be made online (see Disruption of Studies below).

Final Submission Dates All work for this course must be submitted by the Friday of week thirteen, unless there are special circumstances (normally illness or serious misadventure) and unless an extension of time has been granted by the Unit Convenor or the Dean of Arts. At 5pm on the Friday of week 13 the access to the quizzes will close and no further attempts will be possible. You have the whole semester to complete the quizzes. There will be no extension in time for completion of quizzes beyond the closing deadline. You are strongly advised not to leave them until the final week of the session.

Disruption of Studies & Grade Appeals The Faculty of Arts has a webpage where online applications may be made for: Disruption of Studies Grade Appeals Go to: http://www.arts.mq.edu.au/current_students/undergraduate Click on the appropriate type of approval you are requesting.Disruption of Studies should be chosen if you are applying for special consideration or an extension of time for one of your assignments. 

Important Note on Grade Appeals A Grade Appeal can only be lodged on specific grounds. Please ensure you understand what these grounds are before submitting any application. Do follow the procedure specified for a Grade Appeal so that your appeal can be resolved promptly. Please do not email me to ask me to remark work. Note that it is not possible to appeal the result of an individual assessment task completed during the teaching of the unit. An appeal is only possible once the final grade has been released.

For the university's policy on Grade Appeal see: http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/procedure.html For the university's procedure on Grade Appeals see: http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/procedure.html

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Tutorial Paper 20% No Friday of week 6: 5pm
Quizzes 20% No Friday Week 13: 5pm
Essay 40% No Friday Week 10: 5pm
Participation 20% No Each week

Tutorial Paper

Due: Friday of week 6: 5pm
Weighting: 20%

Prepare written answers to the questions in tutorial 6 of no more than 1,000 words in total. Answers may be in point or note form. Address each of the questions in the tutorial and number your answers. Submissions which exceed the prescribed length will not be marked. A list of works of reference and ancient sources actually consulted and found useful should be appended as a bibliography (this list is not included in the word-count). Additionally, all work should be fully referenced. Citation of references and sources should conform to the guidelines set out in the document: Ancient History - Essay Presentation and Conventions (available on the unit's website).

ONE tutorial exercise must be submitted: the topic is defined in week 6.

Date Due: Tutorial exercise is to be submitted by 5pm (Sydney time) on the Friday of week 6

Submission: Submission is made electronically via the ‘Turnitin Tutorial’ link on the unit’s webpage


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • KU1 Recognize the fundamental concepts, principles and theories used in the study of myth.
  • KU2 Apply knowledge and understanding of the essential facts, concepts, principles and theories used in the study of myth.
  • KU3 Communicate effectively with teaching staff and peers
  • S1 Conceptualize, apply, analyze, synthesize, and/or evaluate historical information about myth in the ancient world, gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication
  • S2 Integrate a balance between knowledge of mythology, imagination (looking at ideas and concepts from meaningful original perspectives), and evaluation (employing critical thinking) as a foundation for creative learning behaviour
  • S3 Demonstrate and utilize clear, coherent, evidence-based exposition of knowledge and ideas about myth in the ancient world.
  • AKS1 Apply and model a wide variety of presentation methods
  • AKS2 Utilize effectively research methods and tools in dialogue with staff and peers
  • AKS3 Devise arguments and solve problems in studies related to myth in the ancient world
  • AKS4 Consider and communicate critical and reflective judgements
  • AKS5 Demonstrate historical knowledge (personalities, events, periods) and issues (ideologies, philosophies, traditions) according to intellectual, methodological, and/or ethical conventions used in the study of myth in the ancient world.

Quizzes

Due: Friday Week 13: 5pm
Weighting: 20%

There are short online quizzes on the material covered in the lectures and tutorials each week. Access to the quizzes is through the unit’s website. You may take the quizzes at any time, but you may take each quiz only once. Maximum time allowed for each quiz is 15 mins. These quizzes are instead of an exam: there is no formal examination for the unit. 

At 5pm on the Friday of week 13 the access to the quizzes will close and no further attempts will be possibleYou are advised to complete the quizzes relevant to each week by the end of that week. The quizzes should be attempted after listening to the relevant lectures for that week. It may be useful to have the lecture notes (pdf) open while you attempt the quiz. The readings from the ancient evidence set for the tutorials may also be tested in the quizzes.

You have the flexibility in the course to take the quiz at any time up to the end of week 13 but please do note that access will be closed at the time specified above.  Please do not start a quiz until you are ready to answer the questions! Last year some students opened a quiz to see how it worked: once opened the quiz must be completed as you may take each quiz only once.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • KU1 Recognize the fundamental concepts, principles and theories used in the study of myth.
  • KU2 Apply knowledge and understanding of the essential facts, concepts, principles and theories used in the study of myth.
  • AKS5 Demonstrate historical knowledge (personalities, events, periods) and issues (ideologies, philosophies, traditions) according to intellectual, methodological, and/or ethical conventions used in the study of myth in the ancient world.

Essay

Due: Friday Week 10: 5pm
Weighting: 40%

You are given a list of topics in the Essay section of the unit's ilearn site. Write ONE essay on one of the topics given. You should ask your tutor for further advice on writing your essay.

Submission: Submission is made electronically via the ‘Essay’ Turnitin link on the unit’s webpage.

Title for submitted Document: When you submit your document give it the following name:

Number of Question (1-4).Surname.Student ID number (eg 4.Smith.9458767)

Citation of Sources Used: A list of works of reference and ancient sources actually consulted and found useful should be appended as a bibliography (this list is not included in the word-count). Additionally, all work from which you draw ideas should be fully referenced in your text. Citation of references and sources should conform to the guidelines set out in the document found in the link on the unit website: Guide: Bibliography and Footnoting.

Word limit: 2000 words. Essays which exceed the prescribed length will not be marked.

Topics: A separate list of topics is on the unit webpage. Choose ONE topic and write ONE essay.

Due Date: You must submit your essay by 5pm on Friday of week 10.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • KU1 Recognize the fundamental concepts, principles and theories used in the study of myth.
  • KU2 Apply knowledge and understanding of the essential facts, concepts, principles and theories used in the study of myth.
  • KU4 Demonstrate an informed respect for professional (academic), ethical and sustainability principles and values
  • S1 Conceptualize, apply, analyze, synthesize, and/or evaluate historical information about myth in the ancient world, gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication
  • S2 Integrate a balance between knowledge of mythology, imagination (looking at ideas and concepts from meaningful original perspectives), and evaluation (employing critical thinking) as a foundation for creative learning behaviour
  • S3 Demonstrate and utilize clear, coherent, evidence-based exposition of knowledge and ideas about myth in the ancient world.
  • AKS1 Apply and model a wide variety of presentation methods
  • AKS2 Utilize effectively research methods and tools in dialogue with staff and peers
  • AKS3 Devise arguments and solve problems in studies related to myth in the ancient world
  • AKS4 Consider and communicate critical and reflective judgements
  • AKS5 Demonstrate historical knowledge (personalities, events, periods) and issues (ideologies, philosophies, traditions) according to intellectual, methodological, and/or ethical conventions used in the study of myth in the ancient world.

Participation

Due: Each week
Weighting: 20%

Students are expected to discuss each tutorial topic in class (internal students) and online (external students) [this does NOT include week 6]. Discussion of the topic should include reference to the ancient sources specified for that week. Students should also address at least one of the works of modern scholarship listed for that topic and be prepared to engage with that scholarship in their discussion.

 

External students: Choose 1 question from each of the weekly seminars (excluding week 6) and comment on it briefly (100 words or fewer would be sufficient) in the online forum discussion room. Your response is due by Friday of each week by 11.00pm, but posting earlier in the week is better. You need to post your answer before you can see the answers of everybody else. You should also discuss the points raised by your fellow students. Your response should draw on the ancient source material set each week.

Internal students: You should be prepared to discuss the tutorial questions in class each week. You should prepare in depth a response to at least one of the questions, but also be ready to participate in discussion about all the questions. Your response should draw on the ancient source material set each week.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • KU1 Recognize the fundamental concepts, principles and theories used in the study of myth.
  • KU2 Apply knowledge and understanding of the essential facts, concepts, principles and theories used in the study of myth.
  • KU3 Communicate effectively with teaching staff and peers
  • KU4 Demonstrate an informed respect for professional (academic), ethical and sustainability principles and values
  • S1 Conceptualize, apply, analyze, synthesize, and/or evaluate historical information about myth in the ancient world, gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication
  • S2 Integrate a balance between knowledge of mythology, imagination (looking at ideas and concepts from meaningful original perspectives), and evaluation (employing critical thinking) as a foundation for creative learning behaviour
  • AKS1 Apply and model a wide variety of presentation methods
  • AKS2 Utilize effectively research methods and tools in dialogue with staff and peers
  • AKS3 Devise arguments and solve problems in studies related to myth in the ancient world
  • AKS4 Consider and communicate critical and reflective judgements
  • AKS5 Demonstrate historical knowledge (personalities, events, periods) and issues (ideologies, philosophies, traditions) according to intellectual, methodological, and/or ethical conventions used in the study of myth in the ancient world.

Delivery and Resources

1. Delivery mode Internal and External

2. Lectures: Lectures have been pre-recorded for each of the thirteen weeks of the course. These lectures are available on the unit's website. There are notes to accompany each lecture: these and a list of topics are on the website too. You may set your own pace and listen to the recorded lectures at a time most convenient to you. There are no lectures to attend.

Tutorials: There are tutorials for eleven of the thirteen weeks of the course. Your tutor and your classmates will discuss the tutorial topics with you: for internal students that will be in class, for external students that will be online. External students should note the need both to answer the questions set and to respond to posts by other students. The tutorial topics are found in the weekly schedule for the unit on the website. 

There is a summary list of lecture and tutorial topics on the website.

 

3. Online resources and requirements: Access to the unit's webpage is essential. Online you will find: recorded lectures, lecture notes, discussion of tutorial and lecture topics, essential unit information, the quizzes, submission links for your written assignments, and contact with teaching staff. The unit can be accessed online at: http://ilearn.mq.edu.au/.

PC and Internet access are required. Basic computer s kills (e.g., internet browsing) and skills in word processing are also a requirement. Please contact teaching staff for any further or more specific information.

4. Essential Textbook: Ian Plant, Myth in the Ancient World (Palgrave Macmillan: Sydney, 2012). There is reading set from this book for each tutorial. All ancient sources required for the tutorials are in the textbook.

5. Modern Scholarship: For each tutorial, some modern scholarship has been chosen to supplement the textbook. These readings are available in E-Reserve through the Macquarie University Library’s website. You can access these readings online. Further reading may, of course, be found in the Macquarie Library too. Do not google a general website (such as Wikipedia) and think you have read what is required! 

Unit Schedule

Unit schedule: Lectures and Tutorials

Lectures are pre-recorded. You may access them at any time through the unit's ilearn site. There are tutorials to complement each of the lecture topics (though they are not necessarily on the same subject matter). For internal students, tutorials are held with your tutor in class. For external students all tutorials are ONLINE. There is a separate document which includes the content (questions and readings) for the tutorials on the unit's ilearn page.

Unit schedule: Lectures and Tutorials

Week

 Topics and Lecture topics

Lecturer

Tutorial Topic

 

Topic 1: Introduction to the study of myth

 

 

1

Lectures

A: What is Myth?

B: Definitions of Myth.

Ian Plant

Tutorial Topics

The Nature of Myth in the Ancient World.

Daphne and Lucretia

(Livy History of Rome and Ovid Metamorphoses)

2

A: External interpretations of myth.

B: Internal interpretations of myth.

Ian Plant

The Greek Gods

A Greek Creation Myth

(Hesiod Theogony)

 

Topic 2: Myths of Mesopotamia

 

 

3

Lectures

A: Mesopotamian Creation Myths.

B: Genesis and Mesopotamian Creation Myths

Stephen Llewelyn

Tutorial Topics

Alienation of the Divine

 (Hesiod Works and Days & Genesis)

4

A: The Near Eastern Context for the Biblical Myths.

B: Mesopotamian and Biblical Flood Myths:

Stephen Llewelyn

Flood Myth

(Genesis & Babylonian texts)

 

Topic 3: Myths of Ancient Egypt

 

 

5

Lectures

A: Egyptian Creation Myths.

B: Egyptian Creation and 'uncreation' myths.

Lecturer

Boyo Ockinga

Tutorial Topic

Egyptian Funerary Myth

(The Book of the Dead)

6

A: Divine Kingship in Egypt

B: Ancient Egyptian Kingship Myths.

Boyo Ockinga

No tutorial class this week: prepare your tutorial paper for submission

 

Submit your tutorial paper this week

 

Divine Women (The Homeric Hymn to Demeter)

 

Topic 4: Myths of Ancient Greece

 

 

7

Lectures

A: Amazons in Literature.

B: Amazons in Art and History.

Lecturer

Ian Plant

Tutorial Topics

Myth in Drama

(Euripides Bacchae & Amazon sources and iconography)

8

A: The Search for the Trojan War.

B: History in Homer

Ian Plant

The Trojan War

(Homer Iliad)

9

A: Myth and Religion: Greek Myth, Ritual and Religion.

 B: Greek Heroes and Hero Cult in Athens.

David Phillips

The Hero

(Euripides and other Greek sources)

 

Topic 5: Myths of Rome

 

 

10

Lectures

A: Roman Adoption of Greek Mythology.

B: Roman Mythology.

Lecturer

Tom Hillard

Tutorial Topics

The Founding of Rome

(Livy, Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Plutarch & Virgil)

 

Week 10: Essay Due

Submit your essay this week

 

See separate list of essay topics

11

A: Virgil's Life and Work

B: Virgil and the Aeneid

Mark Hebblewhite

The Roman Epic

(Virgil Aeneid)

12

A: Ovid's Life and Work

B: Ovid's Metamorphosis of myth

Ian Plant

Ovid & the transformation of myth

(Ovid Metamorphosis)

 

Topic 6: Myths Today

 

 

13

Lectures

A: The Christmas Stories

 

B: Heracles, Simpson & his Donkey

Lecturers

Stephen Llewelyn

Ian Plant

No tutorial class

 

 

 

 

Learning and Teaching Activities

Tutorials

These take up the topics introduced in the lectures and through a series of questions on set readings from the ancient sources help the students understand the sources and the theoretical approaches that are taken to interpret them. They practise articulating their ideas in an academic context. This is designed to encourage the students to read the source materials and to allow the students to compose and articulate their understanding of the material studied. It allows academic engagement with other students and their tutors.

Lectures

The program of lectures will introduce the students to the subject matter of the course: key myths from the cultures studied and the theoretical approaches to the study of the myths. Students are given content from the ancient world and examples of how that material has been analysed and interpreted.

Quizzes

These are designed to encourage the students to listen to the lectures and read the relevant texts. The quizzes reinforce the engagement with the content of the unit.

Tutorial Papers

These are designed to encourage and guide the reading of the ancient sources and relevant modern scholarship. Students are introduced to ancient texts and engage with modern scholarship. Tutors are able to provide formative feedback on the written work. Essay This is designed to develop academic literacy, including research and writing skills. Formative feedback is provided.

Essay

This is designed to develop academic literacy, including research and writing skills. Formative feedback is provided.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • S2 Integrate a balance between knowledge of mythology, imagination (looking at ideas and concepts from meaningful original perspectives), and evaluation (employing critical thinking) as a foundation for creative learning behaviour
  • AKS1 Apply and model a wide variety of presentation methods

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper
  • Essay
  • Participation

Learning and teaching activities

  • These take up the topics introduced in the lectures and through a series of questions on set readings from the ancient sources help the students understand the sources and the theoretical approaches that are taken to interpret them. They practise articulating their ideas in an academic context. This is designed to encourage the students to read the source materials and to allow the students to compose and articulate their understanding of the material studied. It allows academic engagement with other students and their tutors.
  • These are designed to encourage and guide the reading of the ancient sources and relevant modern scholarship. Students are introduced to ancient texts and engage with modern scholarship. Tutors are able to provide formative feedback on the written work. Essay This is designed to develop academic literacy, including research and writing skills. Formative feedback is provided.
  • This is designed to develop academic literacy, including research and writing skills. Formative feedback is provided.

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • KU4 Demonstrate an informed respect for professional (academic), ethical and sustainability principles and values

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper
  • Essay
  • Participation

Learning and teaching activities

  • These take up the topics introduced in the lectures and through a series of questions on set readings from the ancient sources help the students understand the sources and the theoretical approaches that are taken to interpret them. They practise articulating their ideas in an academic context. This is designed to encourage the students to read the source materials and to allow the students to compose and articulate their understanding of the material studied. It allows academic engagement with other students and their tutors.
  • These are designed to encourage and guide the reading of the ancient sources and relevant modern scholarship. Students are introduced to ancient texts and engage with modern scholarship. Tutors are able to provide formative feedback on the written work. Essay This is designed to develop academic literacy, including research and writing skills. Formative feedback is provided.
  • This is designed to develop academic literacy, including research and writing skills. Formative feedback is provided.

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • KU3 Communicate effectively with teaching staff and peers
  • KU4 Demonstrate an informed respect for professional (academic), ethical and sustainability principles and values

Assessment task

  • Participation

Learning and teaching activity

  • These take up the topics introduced in the lectures and through a series of questions on set readings from the ancient sources help the students understand the sources and the theoretical approaches that are taken to interpret them. They practise articulating their ideas in an academic context. This is designed to encourage the students to read the source materials and to allow the students to compose and articulate their understanding of the material studied. It allows academic engagement with other students and their tutors.
  • These are designed to encourage and guide the reading of the ancient sources and relevant modern scholarship. Students are introduced to ancient texts and engage with modern scholarship. Tutors are able to provide formative feedback on the written work. Essay This is designed to develop academic literacy, including research and writing skills. Formative feedback is provided.
  • This is designed to develop academic literacy, including research and writing skills. Formative feedback is provided.

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment task

  • Participation

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • KU2 Apply knowledge and understanding of the essential facts, concepts, principles and theories used in the study of myth.
  • S1 Conceptualize, apply, analyze, synthesize, and/or evaluate historical information about myth in the ancient world, gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication
  • AKS2 Utilize effectively research methods and tools in dialogue with staff and peers
  • AKS3 Devise arguments and solve problems in studies related to myth in the ancient world

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper
  • Essay
  • Participation

Learning and teaching activities

  • These take up the topics introduced in the lectures and through a series of questions on set readings from the ancient sources help the students understand the sources and the theoretical approaches that are taken to interpret them. They practise articulating their ideas in an academic context. This is designed to encourage the students to read the source materials and to allow the students to compose and articulate their understanding of the material studied. It allows academic engagement with other students and their tutors.
  • These are designed to encourage and guide the reading of the ancient sources and relevant modern scholarship. Students are introduced to ancient texts and engage with modern scholarship. Tutors are able to provide formative feedback on the written work. Essay This is designed to develop academic literacy, including research and writing skills. Formative feedback is provided.
  • This is designed to develop academic literacy, including research and writing skills. Formative feedback is provided.

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • KU3 Communicate effectively with teaching staff and peers
  • S3 Demonstrate and utilize clear, coherent, evidence-based exposition of knowledge and ideas about myth in the ancient world.
  • AKS1 Apply and model a wide variety of presentation methods
  • AKS4 Consider and communicate critical and reflective judgements
  • AKS5 Demonstrate historical knowledge (personalities, events, periods) and issues (ideologies, philosophies, traditions) according to intellectual, methodological, and/or ethical conventions used in the study of myth in the ancient world.

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper
  • Essay
  • Participation

Learning and teaching activities

  • These take up the topics introduced in the lectures and through a series of questions on set readings from the ancient sources help the students understand the sources and the theoretical approaches that are taken to interpret them. They practise articulating their ideas in an academic context. This is designed to encourage the students to read the source materials and to allow the students to compose and articulate their understanding of the material studied. It allows academic engagement with other students and their tutors.
  • These are designed to encourage and guide the reading of the ancient sources and relevant modern scholarship. Students are introduced to ancient texts and engage with modern scholarship. Tutors are able to provide formative feedback on the written work. Essay This is designed to develop academic literacy, including research and writing skills. Formative feedback is provided.
  • This is designed to develop academic literacy, including research and writing skills. Formative feedback is provided.

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • KU4 Demonstrate an informed respect for professional (academic), ethical and sustainability principles and values
  • AKS1 Apply and model a wide variety of presentation methods
  • AKS2 Utilize effectively research methods and tools in dialogue with staff and peers
  • AKS3 Devise arguments and solve problems in studies related to myth in the ancient world

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper
  • Essay
  • Participation

Learning and teaching activities

  • These take up the topics introduced in the lectures and through a series of questions on set readings from the ancient sources help the students understand the sources and the theoretical approaches that are taken to interpret them. They practise articulating their ideas in an academic context. This is designed to encourage the students to read the source materials and to allow the students to compose and articulate their understanding of the material studied. It allows academic engagement with other students and their tutors.
  • These are designed to encourage and guide the reading of the ancient sources and relevant modern scholarship. Students are introduced to ancient texts and engage with modern scholarship. Tutors are able to provide formative feedback on the written work. Essay This is designed to develop academic literacy, including research and writing skills. Formative feedback is provided.
  • This is designed to develop academic literacy, including research and writing skills. Formative feedback is provided.

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • KU1 Recognize the fundamental concepts, principles and theories used in the study of myth.
  • S2 Integrate a balance between knowledge of mythology, imagination (looking at ideas and concepts from meaningful original perspectives), and evaluation (employing critical thinking) as a foundation for creative learning behaviour
  • S3 Demonstrate and utilize clear, coherent, evidence-based exposition of knowledge and ideas about myth in the ancient world.
  • AKS5 Demonstrate historical knowledge (personalities, events, periods) and issues (ideologies, philosophies, traditions) according to intellectual, methodological, and/or ethical conventions used in the study of myth in the ancient world.

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper
  • Quizzes
  • Essay
  • Participation

Learning and teaching activities

  • These take up the topics introduced in the lectures and through a series of questions on set readings from the ancient sources help the students understand the sources and the theoretical approaches that are taken to interpret them. They practise articulating their ideas in an academic context. This is designed to encourage the students to read the source materials and to allow the students to compose and articulate their understanding of the material studied. It allows academic engagement with other students and their tutors.
  • The program of lectures will introduce the students to the subject matter of the course: key myths from the cultures studied and the theoretical approaches to the study of the myths. Students are given content from the ancient world and examples of how that material has been analysed and interpreted.
  • These are designed to encourage the students to listen to the lectures and read the relevant texts. The quizzes reinforce the engagement with the content of the unit.
  • These are designed to encourage and guide the reading of the ancient sources and relevant modern scholarship. Students are introduced to ancient texts and engage with modern scholarship. Tutors are able to provide formative feedback on the written work. Essay This is designed to develop academic literacy, including research and writing skills. Formative feedback is provided.
  • This is designed to develop academic literacy, including research and writing skills. Formative feedback is provided.

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • KU2 Apply knowledge and understanding of the essential facts, concepts, principles and theories used in the study of myth.
  • S1 Conceptualize, apply, analyze, synthesize, and/or evaluate historical information about myth in the ancient world, gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication
  • S2 Integrate a balance between knowledge of mythology, imagination (looking at ideas and concepts from meaningful original perspectives), and evaluation (employing critical thinking) as a foundation for creative learning behaviour
  • AKS2 Utilize effectively research methods and tools in dialogue with staff and peers
  • AKS4 Consider and communicate critical and reflective judgements

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Paper
  • Essay
  • Participation

Learning and teaching activities

  • These take up the topics introduced in the lectures and through a series of questions on set readings from the ancient sources help the students understand the sources and the theoretical approaches that are taken to interpret them. They practise articulating their ideas in an academic context. This is designed to encourage the students to read the source materials and to allow the students to compose and articulate their understanding of the material studied. It allows academic engagement with other students and their tutors.
  • The program of lectures will introduce the students to the subject matter of the course: key myths from the cultures studied and the theoretical approaches to the study of the myths. Students are given content from the ancient world and examples of how that material has been analysed and interpreted.
  • These are designed to encourage and guide the reading of the ancient sources and relevant modern scholarship. Students are introduced to ancient texts and engage with modern scholarship. Tutors are able to provide formative feedback on the written work. Essay This is designed to develop academic literacy, including research and writing skills. Formative feedback is provided.
  • This is designed to develop academic literacy, including research and writing skills. Formative feedback is provided.

Changes from Previous Offering

The unit has been restructured around key topics. Tutorials have been revised to integrate content with the themes raised in the lectures. Assessment tasks for OUA and MQ students have been aligned. New topic videos have been added.

Changes since First Published

Date Description
23/10/2017 Typo reference to two tutorial papers rather than one corrected
04/08/2017 Internal and external activities are better identified
04/08/2017 Internal and external tasks clarified further
20/07/2017 Internal and external participation tasks clarified