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MAS 205 – Introduction to the Cinema

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Jane Simon
Contact via Email
Y3A 165K
By appointment
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
12cp at 100 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit is an introduction to: 1) some of the main theoretical issues and debates that have defined film studies as an area of cultural interest; and 2) some of the key historical moments in classical Hollywood filmmaking and international filmmaking (from the 1940s through to more recent times). Lectures and tutorials, in conjunction with weekly film screenings, consider topics such as the codes, conventions, and aesthetics of film narrative; film genres; film styles; film canons; modes of storytelling; the relation between fiction film and documentary film (and their hybrids).

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  2. Develop an expansive historical knowledge of film theory.
  3. Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  4. Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  5. Demonstrate skills in independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals.
  6. Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.
  7. Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form.

General Assessment Information

Late Submissions 

Tasks 10% or less. No extensions will be granted. Students who have not submitted the task prior to the deadline will be awarded a mark of 0 for the task, except for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

Tasks above 10%. Students who submit late work without an extension will receive a penalty of 10% per day. This penalty does not apply for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

Please see the link below for the MQ Disruption to Studies Policy.

Disruption to Studies Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Engagement 20% Week 2-13 ongoing
Online Quiz 15% Midnight Monday 3rd April
Film Log 25% 5pm Tue 18th April
Major Essay 40% 5pm Friday 9 June

Engagement

Due: Week 2-13 ongoing
Weighting: 20%

You are expected to actively engage, contribute and discuss ideas in all tutorials. During the semester all students are required to actively engage by:

- listening to the weekly lecture and completing the weekly readings before each tutorial

- viewing the the weekly film before each tutorial

- participating in class discussion and activities

- engaging with your classmates during tutorials by responding to classmates' questions and providing feedback to each other

- bringing along draft work for class activities and writing workshops (for example, tutorial time will be dedicated to workshopping film log entries and essay plans, in order to engage in these workshop activities students will need to prepare draft materials as advised and be ready to workshop them in class). Students will be advised ahead of time via iLearn and in class when to prepare these draft materials.

You must notify your tutor as soon as possible if you believe you may be absent from tutorials at any stage and you should provide your tutor with evidence of a medical or personal emergency.

Marking Criteria

  • Preparation for class and active engagement across the semester (by contributing to large and small group discussions and participating in class activities and workshops)
  • Clarity of communication
  • Ability to evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in verbal discussions
  • Ability to engage critically with key concepts, films and themes covered in readings and lectures across the entire semester (your engagement grade is not about simply attending class - you need to demonstrate your understanding of the weekly lecture, screening, and readings). You receive no marks for attendance, only for engagement and participation.

A rubric for grading your engagement is posted on iLearn and will be discussed in class during the first tutorial in Week 2.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  • Develop an expansive historical knowledge of film theory.
  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form.

Online Quiz

Due: Midnight Monday 3rd April
Weighting: 15%

This is a multiple choice test that will be accessed via iLearn. The test will require students to answer a series of multiple choice questions relating to the key readings, films and lecture content from Weeks 1- 5. The test will open on Friday 31st March at 5pm and close on Monday 3rd April at midnight. The correct answers to the test will be made available after the test has closed.

This test is designed to provide early feedback for students. Key concepts covered in Week 1-5 will inform subsequent topics in the unit. Therefore the test will give students the opportunity to consider which concepts and ideas they have understood, as well as identify areas for improvement in understanding. 

Marking criteria

  • understanding of key concepts in film studies as covered in Week 1-5
  • evidence of reading set texts from Week 1-5
  • evidence of having viewed set films from Week 1-5

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  • Develop an expansive historical knowledge of film theory.
  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.

Film Log

Due: 5pm Tue 18th April
Weighting: 25%

The film log takes the form of five brief (250 word entries). You need to write an entry on five films (and related readings) chosen from the first seven weeks of the unit.

Each entry should consider one or two issues, of your choosing, raised by the week’s readings in relation to the film. The entry should not recount the film or the reading but should offer a concise critical analysis. Examples of film log entries will be available on ilearn and we will be discussing and work-shopping how to write a successful film log entry during tutorials.

Marking Criteria

  • Understanding of key themes, ideas and concepts in theories of film
  • Comparison and analysis of key concepts in the unit
  • Ability to interpret and discuss film form
  • Attention to themes, genres, form, or cultural context of specific films
  • Use of readings to support claims
  • Organisation of film log, including at least five entries with an entry on any five of the films and related readings from Weeks 1-7.
  • Clarity of communication
  • Accurate and appropriate referencing

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  • Develop an expansive historical knowledge of film theory.
  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Demonstrate skills in independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form.

Major Essay

Due: 5pm Friday 9 June
Weighting: 40%

2000 word research essay. Essay topic, marking rubrics and detailed instructions will be distributed in class and posted on iLearn.

Marking Criteria

  • Understanding and critical engagement with key readings in the unit
  • Comparison and analysis of key concepts in the unit
  • Critical analysis of relevant film/s
  • Independent research within the discipline
  • Use of research and reading to support the argument
  • Organisation of argument including clear addressing of the question
  • Clarity of communication
  • Accurate and appropriate referencing

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  • Develop an expansive historical knowledge of film theory.
  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Demonstrate skills in independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form.

Delivery and Resources

CLASSES

Please consult the MQ timetable website for up to date timetabling of lectures and tutorials:

https://timetables.mq.edu.au/2017/

Tutorials:

Please note, you must attend the tutorial you are enrolled in. If you wish to change your tutorial time you can do so via e-student. Your tutor/lecturer will not be able to change your tutorial enrolment. Do not turn up to a tutorial that you are not enrolled in. We cannot accept extra students into a fully enrolled tutorial.

Tutorials begin in Week Two.

ATTENDANCE

This unit has a 3 hour screening and lecture slot (consisting of a 50min lecture and a full length film screening) and a one hour tutorial every week. Lectures are recorded and available through iLearn, however students are strongly encouraged to attend lectures. Lectures are often interactive and some material shown in lectures can't be recorded through Echo360. The films screened will also be available through the Reserve section of the library, and some films are available for viewing through Kanopy via the library website. Tutorial attendance is compulsory. Students are required to prepare for tutorials by having attended or listened to the lecture, having viewed the film, having done the week’s readings and prepared questions and notes. If you miss tutorials without medical certification or other evidence of disruption this will impact on your 'Engagement' mark for the unit.

Outside of class attendance students should expect to spend approximately seven hours each week reading, preparing for tutorials and researching and planning for assignments. 

REQUIRED READING

Required readings are available online through the MQ Library website. To access readings you need to click on the "Unit Readings" tab on the library's home page. 

RECOMMENDED READING

There is a list of further recommended reading for each topic - please refer to iLearn.

TECHNOLOGIES USED AND REQUIRED

Lectures will be recorded and available on iLearn. Details on readings, assessments and links to relevant material will be available on ilearn. Students are expected to regularly check iLearn and their MQ email addresses for announcements.

FEEDBACK

During the semester you will receive feedback in many forms. Sometimes this feedback will be verbal and informal and will come from your tutor such as during tutorials or lectures when you offer up ideas or questions. At times your tutor and lecturer will also offer more general feedback about the group's progress during tutorials. At other times feedback will be more formal, in the case of written feedback on your final essay or the posted correct responses to the questions in the online quiz.

You will also receive valuable feedback from your peers through the semester. This will take the form of written comments on the student forum on ilearn and through activities and discussion during tutorials.

Unit Schedule

Please see iLearn for detailed information about topics, readings, relevant films and further reading suggestions.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  • Develop an expansive historical knowledge of film theory.
  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Demonstrate skills in independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form.

Assessment tasks

  • Engagement
  • Online Quiz
  • Film Log
  • Major Essay

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  • Develop an expansive historical knowledge of film theory.
  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Demonstrate skills in independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.

Assessment tasks

  • Engagement
  • Online Quiz
  • Film Log
  • Major Essay

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  • Develop an expansive historical knowledge of film theory.
  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Demonstrate skills in independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.

Assessment tasks

  • Engagement
  • Film Log
  • Major Essay

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.

Assessment tasks

  • Film Log
  • Major Essay

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  • Develop an expansive historical knowledge of film theory.
  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Demonstrate skills in independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form.

Assessment tasks

  • Engagement
  • Film Log
  • Major Essay

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.

Assessment tasks

  • Engagement
  • Film Log
  • Major Essay

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key debates, themes and concepts in the broad field of Film Studies.
  • Evaluate and distinguish between theoretical positions on film practices and texts.
  • Analyse films critically according to themes, genres, form and cultural contexts.
  • Demonstrate skills in independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals.
  • Evaluate critically and analyse film texts and theories of film in both written form and in verbal discussions.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form.

Assessment tasks

  • Engagement
  • Film Log
  • Major Essay

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Develop an expansive historical knowledge of film theory.

Assessment task

  • Engagement

Changes from Previous Offering

The assessment structure has changed to include an online test which will allow students to gain early feedback on their understandings of key concepts from the first five weeks of the unit.