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ICOM304 – International Media Policy

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Convenor and tutor
Maya Ranganathan
Contact via email, Phone number: 98502251
Room no 156, Hub no 147, Y3A
TBA on ilearn page
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
36cp at 100 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
3cp in ICOM or MAS units at 300 level
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit explores the issues that impact on media policy in different regions/countries of the world. It aims to impart an understanding of how modes of governance, cultural contexts and media flows impact upon policy, thus directing communication flows. Students are expected to bring previous knowledge of media, international communication and cultural studies units to the exploration of communication environment and policy issues in contexts of their choice. The assessments require extensive reading, analysis and interpretation of data in different political and social environments.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Synthesize knowledge of media, communication and cultural studies in order to critically reflect on communication environments in the globalised world.
  2. Analyse and debate issues relating to media policies in the context of emerging world order and in the socio-cultural framework specific to different countries in the regions.
  3. Evaluate the issues that impact on media policy and their influences on communication work environments in different regions.
  4. Evaluate and appraise media policy issues in historical/sociological and political contexts and identify causal relationships by applying discipline knowledge and analytical skills
  5. Communication of professional discourse in oral and written contexts

General Assessment Information

Late submissions

Students who submit late work without an extension will receive a penalty of 10% per day. This penalty does not apply for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

All written assessments are to be uploaded in Turnitin at least 5 minutes ahead of the time due on due date. Kindly wait for acknowledgement of upload. Submissions by email will not be entertained. In case of technical error, please email a screenshot with a copy of the essay to the tutor asap.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Presentation 25% Weeks 3-12
Online test 30% Week 13
Research essay 35% Week 12, 5 p.m Monday
Active participation 10% Week 2-12

Presentation

Due: Weeks 3-12
Weighting: 25%

Students in groups of 3-5 (depending on the total numbers in the tutorial class) will conduct the tutorial class by addressing the question for the week mentioned in ilearn in the week's block. The activity will begin 5 minutes past the tutorial hour and last for 40 minutes in total.

The exercise includes explaining and exploring the concepts dealt with in the week’s Readings/lecture while critically examining the issues related to the question (listed in ilearn page in the respective week block). The readings do not contain answers to the question; the concepts drawn from the readings are to be employed in answering the question. The question will deal with media and policy environments in particular countries. The exercise is designed to simulate roles that graduate students are likely to play in their chosen career paths in communication. Soft copy of a 500-word summary of the presentation with a list of references is to be uploaded on Turnitin; a hard copy is to be handed over to the tutor prior to the presentation. This summary will be used by the tutor as a guide for the evaluation of the presentation. Failure to submit it prior to presentation will lead to loss of marks.

The content of the presentation and the 500-word summary will be marked on 10; the remaining marks are for manner of presentation, including visual aids used, time management and co-ordination. 

The total time allotted to the team (regardless of the number of members) is 40 minutes,  including the time for questions and answers/class activity and interaction. Class interaction must be facilitated. It can take the form of questions to the class, group discussions, debates, game shows etc.  Marking rubrics will be available in ilearn at the start of semester. It is the student’s responsibility to be in contact with other members of the group and arrange to work together. Tutors will not be able to provide contact details nor facilitate meetings.

The following criteria will be used for grading:

The team will be graded on

1. Content, both relating to the concepts for the week and the ways in which they are applied to address the question. Clarity, credibiltiy of the sources used, citation in slides and appropriate examples will be taken into account. Online references from Wikipedia and Youtube clips will not be considered highly. The suggested referencing format is Harvard or in-text referencing style.

2. Original research: critical evaluation of contemporary media content. The analysis must be based on more than easily available Youtube clips and online sources and show evidence of critical thought.

Individual members will be graded on

3. Manner of presentation: creative delivery, clear expression and professional discourse, and judicious use of available time.  A very short presentation will be marked down as also one that exceeds time.

4.  Visual aids: formatting in slides and other visual aids, grammar and spelling

5. Methods to involve class participation. This may take the form of discussion questions, debates, quizzes or any other activity that stimulates thought and discussion. Emphasis is on contribution to learning.

In summary, 10 marks is for group activity and 15 are for individual contribution.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Synthesize knowledge of media, communication and cultural studies in order to critically reflect on communication environments in the globalised world.
  • Analyse and debate issues relating to media policies in the context of emerging world order and in the socio-cultural framework specific to different countries in the regions.
  • Evaluate the issues that impact on media policy and their influences on communication work environments in different regions.
  • Evaluate and appraise media policy issues in historical/sociological and political contexts and identify causal relationships by applying discipline knowledge and analytical skills
  • Communication of professional discourse in oral and written contexts

Online test

Due: Week 13
Weighting: 30%

The aim of the test is to ensure that the concepts dealt with in the readings and the lectures have been understood adequately to facilitate application in work environments.  The test contain multiple choice questions and will open in Week 13, from Monday to Friday. It is time-bound. Students will have to finish it at one sitting in the time specified prior to the test. Owing to the nature of the assessment, requests for alternate arrangements or for repeating the tests are not possible.

The following assessment criteria will apply:

Correct understanding of the concepts: A summary of the concepts as in the readings and as explained in the lectures.

Knowledge of theorists: Reference to key theorists mentioned in the readings and lectures.

 

 

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Synthesize knowledge of media, communication and cultural studies in order to critically reflect on communication environments in the globalised world.
  • Communication of professional discourse in oral and written contexts

Research essay

Due: Week 12, 5 p.m Monday
Weighting: 35%

Summative assessment: 35 per cent

1. Select one of the topics listed below. Explore in not more than 1500 words the desirability and efficacy of media policy to address the issue. You may take a case study approach or make a general argument providing appropriate examples. Whatever the approach, evidence of reading and research and reference to the concepts dealt with in the unit are required.

  1. Cultural imperialism is a consequence of media globalisation
  2. Increasing social violence is a result of media violence
  3. The fourth estate role of journalism is problematic given the prevalent economic and organisational factors and journalistic practices

The essay maybe structured thus: 

Introduction

Begin the essay with a brief theoretical reflection on the various perspectives and academic debates relevant to the issue. Then select a specific aspect - a particularly contentious debate or a set of contradictions or tensions and place it in the context of media policy. 

Analysis

Choose an appropriate case study or, if you are making a general argument appropriate examples. Placing it/them in the framework of the theories mentioned in the ‘introduction’ explore the various aspects, particularly the ways in which media policy addresses or fails to address contradictions or tensions. While you are not expected to conduct original research in the form of interviews or data collection, you are expected to draw on academic literature and discuss the issue analytically.

Conclusion

Assess whether and/or how policy provides (or, can provide) a solution to the challenges or fails to do so and your suggestions.

 

2. Choose a current or recent (not more than a year old) public consultation on a key communications policy issue in Australia. Write a clear response to the key issue, or answer one or more of the questions raised in the consultation. Set out a proposed policy solution to the issue(s) raised in the consultation. Support your argument with evidence and include references to the relevant academic literature on the topic. Show an awareness of the wider policy context.

Introduction must contain a short executive summary of the main points.

The body of the essay must contain a clear central argument providing a critical assessment of the key issue or question. This must be constructed as continuous prose and not as a report with dot points.

Conclusion must reiterate the main argument and summarise the policy solution.

 

3. Discuss how an understanding of the histories of information and communication technologies policies can contribute to our understanding of the social shaping of technology. In the context of increase in ‘fake news’, ‘alternative facts’ and political campaigns on social media, is there a need for specific policy in liberal democracies to address the issue?

The essay maybe structured thus: 

Introduction

Begin the essay with a brief theoretical reflection on the nature of and rationale of media policies in liberal democracies. Then explore the employment of social media for political communication in the present day. What are the ways in which they challenge perceptions of media’s role in society? 

Analysis

Choose an appropriate case study or if you are making a general argument appropriate examples. Placing it/them in the framework of the theories mentioned in the ‘introduction’ and the history of communication policies, explore the various aspects, particularly the ways in which media policy may address the tensions. While you are not expected to conduct original research in the form of interviews or data collection, you are expected to draw on academic literature and discuss the issue analytically.

Conclusion

Assess whether and/or how policy can provide a solution to the challenges that information on social media pose to credibility and neutrality.

The submission must meet the requirements of a 300-level unit and a capstone. Marking rubric will be available ilearn at the start of semester.

The essay will be graded using the following criteria:

1. Argument, substantiation and discourse: clear understanding of the concepts, references to appropriate research, credible sources. Clarity is an important requirement. This refers to effective use of discipline-specific and appropriate language.

2. Coherence and organisation: precision and interconnectedness of theory, concept and analysis. The concepts dealt with in the unit must be extended to the argument and exploration of issues.

3. Style and grammar: Clear use of language without spelling mistakes and grammatical errors.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Synthesize knowledge of media, communication and cultural studies in order to critically reflect on communication environments in the globalised world.
  • Analyse and debate issues relating to media policies in the context of emerging world order and in the socio-cultural framework specific to different countries in the regions.
  • Evaluate the issues that impact on media policy and their influences on communication work environments in different regions.
  • Evaluate and appraise media policy issues in historical/sociological and political contexts and identify causal relationships by applying discipline knowledge and analytical skills
  • Communication of professional discourse in oral and written contexts

Active participation

Due: Week 2-12
Weighting: 10%

Active participation is assessed by a student’s engagement in the tutorials. They include participation in discussions facilitated by the lecturer/tutor as also during presentations, general questions asked during lectures or tutorials and involvement in set activities. Participation is expected to be well considered and relevant to the unit of study.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Synthesize knowledge of media, communication and cultural studies in order to critically reflect on communication environments in the globalised world.
  • Analyse and debate issues relating to media policies in the context of emerging world order and in the socio-cultural framework specific to different countries in the regions.
  • Communication of professional discourse in oral and written contexts

Delivery and Resources

The lectures for this unit are pre-recorded and will be available in the Echo 360 block in ilearn ahead of  the tutorials. This unit uses E-Readings. Relevant books are available in the Library Reserve as mentioned in the Readings list. Students are expected to access all resources relevant to the week ahead of the tutorials.

All communication relating to the unit will be on ilearn. It is the student's responsibility to check ilearn regularly, at least once every week. Students are also advised to check their student emails regularly.

Unit Schedule

No tutorials in Week 1. This time is to be employed in familiarising oneself with library resources. This unit requires extensive research and it is almost impossible to tackle the assessment questions effectively without outside reading.

 

Week 2

Media policy in the era of globalisation

Tutorials begin this week: Introduction to unit and assessments. The unit content begins by introducing some basic concepts relating to media processes, media's role in society and the need for media policy.

Students to finalise presentation schedules with the Tutor.

 
 

Week 3

Regulation of media and communication for 'public interest'

This week is devoted to exploring the concept of 'public interest'. It begins with the ways in which the role of media has been envisaged in liberal democracies particularly in relation to ensuring 'public interest' and explores the challenges in regulating media and communication for the purpose.

Tutorial presentations begin this week and continue till Week 12. Weekly questions listed in ilearn.

 
 

Week 4

The impact of Cold War on communication policies around the world

The study of communication policy-making as a political process takes us to an evaluation of one of the momentous periods in world history: the end of cold war. The week's content traces the ways in which world politics has shaped the communication landscape of today.

 
 

Week 5

The role of the nation-state in defining role of media/communications 

The readings and lecture deals with the central role played by the nation-state is shaping media and communication environments within the nation-states.

 
 

Week 6

The CNN effect: televisions' influence on international affairs

The evolution of media technologies has posed further challenges to policy. The rise of global television is dealt with this week.

 
 

Week 7

Evolution of new media technologies and their impact on global politics

The week is devoted to analysing the spread of new media technologies and the ways in which they challenge media policies.

 
  MID SEMESTER BREAK  
 

Week 8

Impact of 'transnationalisation' on (national) media policies

The evolution of media technologies has been accompanied by phenomenal changes in world politics. One of the questions that need attention is whether globalisation has diluted the powers of nation-states which have hitherto shaped communication environments within their boundaries.

 
 

Week 9

Globalisation, media imperialism and (national) media policies

This week, we take a look at what global television, new media technologies and globalisation mean to the developing world. Do they together work towards exerting a western hegemony? Are the fears of developing nations of media imperialism justified?

 
 

Week 10

Regulating new media technologies

Media policies have to a large extent been successful in regulating older media. The week's content questions their efficacy in regulating constantly evolving new media technologies. A fundamental question that is raised is whether new media technologies need to be regulated.

 
 

Week 11

Political economy of global media and policy

Much of the study of media has been within the framework of 'political economy'. This week is devoted to questions relating to media ownership and regulation of ownership to ensure diversity of opinion and universal accessibility. 

 
 

Week 12

New technologies as 'power' and 'counter power'

The discussion this week focusses on the potential of new technologies for political communication and the implications. We end the unit by looking at the constraints of policy to address some of the significant issues in the present day and the way forward.

 

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Additional information

MMCCS website https://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/faculties_and_departments/faculty_of_arts/department_of_media_music_communication_and_cultural_studies/ MMCCS Session Re-mark Application http://www.mq.edu.au/pubstatic/public/download/?id=167914 Information is correct at the time of publication

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Synthesize knowledge of media, communication and cultural studies in order to critically reflect on communication environments in the globalised world.
  • Analyse and debate issues relating to media policies in the context of emerging world order and in the socio-cultural framework specific to different countries in the regions.
  • Communication of professional discourse in oral and written contexts

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation
  • Online test
  • Research essay
  • Active participation

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Synthesize knowledge of media, communication and cultural studies in order to critically reflect on communication environments in the globalised world.
  • Analyse and debate issues relating to media policies in the context of emerging world order and in the socio-cultural framework specific to different countries in the regions.
  • Evaluate the issues that impact on media policy and their influences on communication work environments in different regions.
  • Evaluate and appraise media policy issues in historical/sociological and political contexts and identify causal relationships by applying discipline knowledge and analytical skills
  • Communication of professional discourse in oral and written contexts

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation
  • Online test
  • Research essay
  • Active participation

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Synthesize knowledge of media, communication and cultural studies in order to critically reflect on communication environments in the globalised world.
  • Analyse and debate issues relating to media policies in the context of emerging world order and in the socio-cultural framework specific to different countries in the regions.
  • Evaluate the issues that impact on media policy and their influences on communication work environments in different regions.
  • Evaluate and appraise media policy issues in historical/sociological and political contexts and identify causal relationships by applying discipline knowledge and analytical skills
  • Communication of professional discourse in oral and written contexts

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation
  • Research essay

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyse and debate issues relating to media policies in the context of emerging world order and in the socio-cultural framework specific to different countries in the regions.
  • Evaluate the issues that impact on media policy and their influences on communication work environments in different regions.

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation
  • Research essay

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Synthesize knowledge of media, communication and cultural studies in order to critically reflect on communication environments in the globalised world.
  • Analyse and debate issues relating to media policies in the context of emerging world order and in the socio-cultural framework specific to different countries in the regions.
  • Evaluate and appraise media policy issues in historical/sociological and political contexts and identify causal relationships by applying discipline knowledge and analytical skills
  • Communication of professional discourse in oral and written contexts

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation
  • Research essay
  • Active participation

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Synthesize knowledge of media, communication and cultural studies in order to critically reflect on communication environments in the globalised world.
  • Evaluate the issues that impact on media policy and their influences on communication work environments in different regions.
  • Communication of professional discourse in oral and written contexts

Assessment task

  • Presentation

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyse and debate issues relating to media policies in the context of emerging world order and in the socio-cultural framework specific to different countries in the regions.
  • Evaluate the issues that impact on media policy and their influences on communication work environments in different regions.
  • Evaluate and appraise media policy issues in historical/sociological and political contexts and identify causal relationships by applying discipline knowledge and analytical skills

Assessment task

  • Presentation

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Synthesize knowledge of media, communication and cultural studies in order to critically reflect on communication environments in the globalised world.
  • Evaluate the issues that impact on media policy and their influences on communication work environments in different regions.
  • Evaluate and appraise media policy issues in historical/sociological and political contexts and identify causal relationships by applying discipline knowledge and analytical skills
  • Communication of professional discourse in oral and written contexts

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation
  • Research essay
  • Active participation

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Synthesize knowledge of media, communication and cultural studies in order to critically reflect on communication environments in the globalised world.
  • Analyse and debate issues relating to media policies in the context of emerging world order and in the socio-cultural framework specific to different countries in the regions.
  • Evaluate the issues that impact on media policy and their influences on communication work environments in different regions.
  • Evaluate and appraise media policy issues in historical/sociological and political contexts and identify causal relationships by applying discipline knowledge and analytical skills
  • Communication of professional discourse in oral and written contexts

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation
  • Online test
  • Research essay
  • Active participation

Changes from Previous Offering

Assessment questions have been changed.