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GEOS344 – Petrology and Geodynamics of the Lithosphere

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor, Lecturer, practical tutor
Stephen Foley
Contact via 9452
12 Wally's Walk, Room 128
Lecturer/practical tutor
Dorrit Jacob
BD Building level 3.
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
GEOS207 and (GEOS226 or GEOS272)
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit embodies a detailed description of the chemical and mineralogical composition of the crust and uppermost 200 km of the mantle. Themes covered include the composition of the mantle and the melts it can give rise to, the mineralogical makeup and textures of metamorphic crustal rocks, and a characterisation of the assemblages of rocks that are typical for various tectonic environments on the modern and ancient Earth. Emphasis is laid on integrating information from different sub-disciplines of the Earth sciences. Practical work comprises exercises on metamorphic and igneous rocks and builds an understanding of the intimate relationship between geochemistry and petrology.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. To gain an appreciation of the mineralogy of mantle and lower crustal rocks and of their melting conditions and processes by which they may melt.
  2. To gain an appreciation of the relationship between mineral assemblages, mineral composition, and the geochemistry of the rocks they are contained in.
  3. To be able to recognize metamorphic mineral assemblages under the petrographic microscope and to assign these to their metamorphic pressure-temperature conditions of origin.
  4. To read, construct and interpret basic geological phase diagrams.
  5. To gain an overview of the rock types (igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary) to be expected in specific geotectonic environments, and so be able to recognize geological settings in the Earth's past.
  6. To further develop skills in teamwork, independent observations, and written presentation of scientific information.
  7. To gain an appreciation of the deep cycles of volatile components in the Earth.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Quizzes 15% TBA
Practical assessments 30% TBA
Final examination 40% Examination period
Assignment 15% 08/09/2017

Quizzes

Due: TBA
Weighting: 15%

3 quizzes during semester, each worth 5% of total mark


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • To gain an appreciation of the mineralogy of mantle and lower crustal rocks and of their melting conditions and processes by which they may melt.
  • To gain an appreciation of the relationship between mineral assemblages, mineral composition, and the geochemistry of the rocks they are contained in.
  • To read, construct and interpret basic geological phase diagrams.
  • To gain an overview of the rock types (igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary) to be expected in specific geotectonic environments, and so be able to recognize geological settings in the Earth's past.
  • To gain an appreciation of the deep cycles of volatile components in the Earth.

Practical assessments

Due: TBA
Weighting: 30%

Practical work done in the three-hour practical classes will be collected in and marked on two occasions.

Marks will be 15% for each practical collected in, totalling 30% for the course.

Whether a given week's practical work will be collected in for marking will be announced at the beginning of the practical session.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • To gain an appreciation of the mineralogy of mantle and lower crustal rocks and of their melting conditions and processes by which they may melt.
  • To gain an appreciation of the relationship between mineral assemblages, mineral composition, and the geochemistry of the rocks they are contained in.
  • To be able to recognize metamorphic mineral assemblages under the petrographic microscope and to assign these to their metamorphic pressure-temperature conditions of origin.
  • To read, construct and interpret basic geological phase diagrams.
  • To gain an overview of the rock types (igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary) to be expected in specific geotectonic environments, and so be able to recognize geological settings in the Earth's past.
  • To further develop skills in teamwork, independent observations, and written presentation of scientific information.

Final examination

Due: Examination period
Weighting: 40%

The examination will consist partly of questions on the material covered in lectures and partly of practical work on microscopy, which will be covered in practicals after the mid-term break.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • To gain an appreciation of the mineralogy of mantle and lower crustal rocks and of their melting conditions and processes by which they may melt.
  • To gain an appreciation of the relationship between mineral assemblages, mineral composition, and the geochemistry of the rocks they are contained in.
  • To be able to recognize metamorphic mineral assemblages under the petrographic microscope and to assign these to their metamorphic pressure-temperature conditions of origin.
  • To gain an overview of the rock types (igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary) to be expected in specific geotectonic environments, and so be able to recognize geological settings in the Earth's past.
  • To further develop skills in teamwork, independent observations, and written presentation of scientific information.
  • To gain an appreciation of the deep cycles of volatile components in the Earth.

Assignment

Due: 08/09/2017
Weighting: 15%

Assignment will consist of (a) a calculation of the compositions and water contents of common metamorphic minerals and (b) an essay about the pressure-temperature stability of these minerals. Background will be covered in the lecture in Week 4.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • To gain an appreciation of the relationship between mineral assemblages, mineral composition, and the geochemistry of the rocks they are contained in.
  • To further develop skills in teamwork, independent observations, and written presentation of scientific information.
  • To gain an appreciation of the deep cycles of volatile components in the Earth.

Delivery and Resources

Required and Recommended Texts and/or Materials

There is no set textbook for GEOS 344.

The following books have been taken as sources for many graphics used in lectures. Others come from scientific journal publications and will be made available on-line (iLearn) as the course proceeds.

Winter, J.D. (2010) Principles and igneous and metamorphic geology. Pearson education. ISBN-10: 0321592573

Best, M.G. (2003) Igneous and metamorphic petrology. Blackwell. ISBN-10: 1405105887

Bucher, K., Grapes, R. (2011) Petrogenesis of metamorphic rocks. Springer. ISBN-10: 3540741682

Spear, F. S. (1994) Metamorphic phase equilibria and pressure-temperature-time paths. Mineralogical Society of America Monograph. ISBN 0-939950340

Vernon, R. H., Clarke, G.L. (2008) Principles of metamorphic petrology. Cambridge. ISBN-10: 0521871786

Philpotts, A.R., Ague, J.J. (2009) Principles of igneous and metamorphic petrology. Cambridge. ISBN-10: 0521880068

Blatt, H., Tracy, R., Owens, B. (2005) Petrology: igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic. W.H. Freeman. ISBN-10: 0716737434

Putnis, A. (1992) Introduction to mineral sciences. Cambridge. ISBN-10: 0521429471

Spry, A. (1969) Metamorphic textures. Pergamon Press.

Nesse, W.D. (2011) Introduction to mineralogy. Oxford. ISBN-10: 0199827389

Library Loans

The Library at Macquarie will have provided you with information on library loans. The procedures differ for metropolitan and country students. Please familiarise yourself with the procedures appropriate in your case. If you have any enquiries contact the Library on (02) 9850-7500.

Technology Used and Required

Unit Web Page

http://ilearn.mq.edu.au

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • To gain an appreciation of the mineralogy of mantle and lower crustal rocks and of their melting conditions and processes by which they may melt.
  • To gain an appreciation of the relationship between mineral assemblages, mineral composition, and the geochemistry of the rocks they are contained in.
  • To be able to recognize metamorphic mineral assemblages under the petrographic microscope and to assign these to their metamorphic pressure-temperature conditions of origin.
  • To read, construct and interpret basic geological phase diagrams.
  • To gain an overview of the rock types (igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary) to be expected in specific geotectonic environments, and so be able to recognize geological settings in the Earth's past.
  • To further develop skills in teamwork, independent observations, and written presentation of scientific information.
  • To gain an appreciation of the deep cycles of volatile components in the Earth.

Assessment tasks

  • Practical assessments
  • Final examination
  • Assignment

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • To gain an appreciation of the deep cycles of volatile components in the Earth.

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • To gain an appreciation of the mineralogy of mantle and lower crustal rocks and of their melting conditions and processes by which they may melt.
  • To gain an appreciation of the relationship between mineral assemblages, mineral composition, and the geochemistry of the rocks they are contained in.
  • To be able to recognize metamorphic mineral assemblages under the petrographic microscope and to assign these to their metamorphic pressure-temperature conditions of origin.
  • To read, construct and interpret basic geological phase diagrams.
  • To gain an overview of the rock types (igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary) to be expected in specific geotectonic environments, and so be able to recognize geological settings in the Earth's past.
  • To gain an appreciation of the deep cycles of volatile components in the Earth.

Assessment tasks

  • Quizzes
  • Practical assessments
  • Final examination
  • Assignment

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • To gain an appreciation of the mineralogy of mantle and lower crustal rocks and of their melting conditions and processes by which they may melt.
  • To gain an appreciation of the relationship between mineral assemblages, mineral composition, and the geochemistry of the rocks they are contained in.
  • To be able to recognize metamorphic mineral assemblages under the petrographic microscope and to assign these to their metamorphic pressure-temperature conditions of origin.
  • To read, construct and interpret basic geological phase diagrams.
  • To gain an overview of the rock types (igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary) to be expected in specific geotectonic environments, and so be able to recognize geological settings in the Earth's past.
  • To further develop skills in teamwork, independent observations, and written presentation of scientific information.
  • To gain an appreciation of the deep cycles of volatile components in the Earth.

Assessment tasks

  • Quizzes
  • Practical assessments
  • Final examination
  • Assignment

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment tasks

  • Practical assessments
  • Final examination

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • To gain an appreciation of the relationship between mineral assemblages, mineral composition, and the geochemistry of the rocks they are contained in.
  • To further develop skills in teamwork, independent observations, and written presentation of scientific information.

Assessment tasks

  • Final examination
  • Assignment

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • To gain an appreciation of the mineralogy of mantle and lower crustal rocks and of their melting conditions and processes by which they may melt.
  • To gain an appreciation of the relationship between mineral assemblages, mineral composition, and the geochemistry of the rocks they are contained in.
  • To be able to recognize metamorphic mineral assemblages under the petrographic microscope and to assign these to their metamorphic pressure-temperature conditions of origin.
  • To further develop skills in teamwork, independent observations, and written presentation of scientific information.
  • To gain an appreciation of the deep cycles of volatile components in the Earth.

Assessment tasks

  • Practical assessments
  • Final examination
  • Assignment