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POL 108 – Introduction to Global Politics

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Lecturer
Dr Lavina Lee
Contact via lavina.lee@mq.edu.au
Rm 431, Building W6A
Thursdays 1.30 - 3 pm
Tutors TBA
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
Global politics is often dramatic and contentious covering big picture dilemmas such as what are the causes of war and peace? How do we find solutions to shared global problems like climate change and preventing the spread of nuclear weapons? How do we make sense of persistent poverty and underdevelopment in some parts of the world but not others? Whose political ideas matter most and why? Finally, what have been the implications of globalisation for world politics? This unit equips students with the tools to understand the forces that shape the world we live in by introducing them to the key issues, institutions, ideas and actors involved in global politics. The first section of the unit outlines the historical context, key theories and concepts, and fundamental institutions of contemporary global politics. The second section covers important contemporary issues including security challenges, climate change, nuclear proliferation, terrorism, global inequality, the role of culture, religion and identity in global politics, great power rivalry, and globalisation. The unit gives students the foundations necessary for undertaking a major in International Relations or Politics.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Develop the capacity for critical analysis.
  2. Develop and apply research skills that enable students to provide evidence to support their arguments.
  3. Develop the skill to write cogently and to structure arguments in a logical order.
  4. Encourage students to become engaged with the key issues and challenges that are currently facing the world.
  5. Encourage students to see themselves as agents of positive change.
  6. Understand and explain the key concepts, theories, methods, and issues relevant to the study of International Relations at an introductory level.
  7. Identify and understand the defining debates in the field of Global Politics.

General Assessment Information

Policies for this Unit

Essays will be FAILED for the following reasons

1. Plagiarism – for example, where sentences or paragraphs are taken word-for-word or nearly word-for-word from another source and presented as original expression. See the University's Academic Honesty Policy for an in-depth explanation of what constitutes plagiarism. Plagiarism is taken very seriously by the Convenor and the Department generally. A plagiarised essay will get zero marks and the student will receive a fail grade. In addition, it is Faculty policy that a note of the offence is placed on the student’s academic record. If this is a second offence the penalties may escalate to failure of the course, and expulsion from the degree.

2. Excessive use of direct quotes may result in a fail grade.  As a general rule, no more than 10% of your overall word length should appear in direct quotes.  You must try to express your ideas and arguments in your own words as much as possible. This demonstrates true understanding. 

3. Identical or nearly identical essays will all fail – regardless of the original authorship. 

4. Work that is significantly below the required word length

5. Essays written with poor English grammar and expression may be failed if the marker is unable to understand the argument(s) raised. 

Examination 

The only exception to sitting an examination at the designated time (above) is because of documented illness or unavoidable disruption. In these circumstances, you may wish to consider applying for 'disruption of studies'. Consult the Disruption of Studies Policy (below) for further information about what criteria must be met.

If a Supplementary Examination is granted as a result of the Disruption of Studies process, the examination will be scheduled after the conclusion of the official examination period. 

You are advised that it is Macquarie University policy not to set early examinations for individuals or groups of students. All students are expected to ensure that they are available until the end of the teaching semester, that is the final day of the official examination period.

Extensions and Penalties

The following policies will apply in relation to the essay plan and major research essay.

EXTENSIONS

Any student seeking an extension of time to submit their essay plan or research paper must, except in extraordinary circumstances, submit to the Convenor (or have submitted on their behalf) a request in writing and supportive documentary evidence before the due date. Extensions will not be given other than in exceptional cases of illness.  In such cases, a certificate signed by a medical practitioner must be submitted as supportive documentary evidence. In extraordinary circumstances where a written request for an extension cannot be submitted, an application for an extension can be sought verbally. However, in such cases, any extension granted will be subject to the student subsequently submitting such documentary evidence as is deemed appropriate by the Convenor. If an extension is sought due to the death of a family member, proof must be provided in the form of a death certificate.  

Whilst we do understand that many or most students support themselves through paid employment, extensions cannot be granted on this basis alone.  Students must manage their time and workloads accordingly.  Essay topics will be made available early in the semester leaving sufficient time for essay preparation.  Meeting deadlines for assignments is treated very seriously in this course. Accordingly, the penalties for late submission are high.  

PENALTIES FOR LATE SUBMISSION

Any research paper that is submitted after the due date and without having obtained an extension will be penalised at a rate of 3% per day.  For example:  

  • a 9% penalty will be applied to an assignment that is 3 days late
  • a 21% penalty will be applied to an assignment that is 7 days late.  

Any paper that is submitted after the 14th day will not be marked and the student submitting such a paper will be deemed not to have completed and submitted the paper.

Assignment Submission

Hard copy submission of assignments will not be required for this course. All assignments are to be submitted online using the ilearn website for this unit. A Turnitin link for submission will be set up there. Comments and grades will also be available online.

Turn-it-in

All written work in this course is also required to be uploaded using the Turnitin link provided on the ilearn website for this unit. Turnitin is a type of anti-plagiarism software used by the university. Work that is not uploaded using the Turnitin link on ilearn will not be graded and will receive a mark of zero.

Re-submission of assessment tasks

Re-submission of assessment tasks is not possible in this unit. Please consult with your tutor before handing in any assessment task if you have any questions. Also, see the section below titled 'student support' for details about workshops on research skills, essay writing, and plagiarism available to all students in the first weeks of the semester.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Class Participation 10% No Ongoing
Quiz 10% No 30 March 2017
Essay Plan 10% No Friday 7 April
Major Research Essay 40% No Tuesday 2 May
Formal Examination 30% No Formal examination period

Class Participation

Due: Ongoing
Weighting: 10%

Throughout the semester students will be assessed on their participation in class discussion and learning activities during tutorials. Students are expected to be prepared for class discussion by reading the materials set as 'required reading' on ilearn, engaging in any online activities listed for each week, and listening to the lectures prior to your tutorial. Students who prepare for the tutorials by completing the readings and engaging in the lecture and online material always get the most benefit from the unit. 

Participation marks are only awarded to those who demonstrate an awareness of the course materials by actively participating in tutorials. Attendance alone does not constitute participation. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Develop the capacity for critical analysis.
  • Encourage students to become engaged with the key issues and challenges that are currently facing the world.
  • Encourage students to see themselves as agents of positive change.
  • Understand and explain the key concepts, theories, methods, and issues relevant to the study of International Relations at an introductory level.
  • Identify and understand the defining debates in the field of Global Politics.

Quiz

Due: 30 March 2017
Weighting: 10%

An online quiz will be released on ilearn on Thursday 30 March 2017. It will be 1 hour in length and consist of multiple choice questions covering the topics discussed in weeks 1, 2, 3 and 4 of the course.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand and explain the key concepts, theories, methods, and issues relevant to the study of International Relations at an introductory level.
  • Identify and understand the defining debates in the field of Global Politics.

Essay Plan

Due: Friday 7 April
Weighting: 10%

This assessment is intended to assist you in researching, planning and writing your major essay. In this task, you will select an essay question for the major essay, complete some preliminary research on the topic, provide an annotated bibliography identifying three key works that you will refer to in the essay, and write an essay plan. Further instructions on how to complete this task will be provided on ilearn and in lectures.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Develop and apply research skills that enable students to provide evidence to support their arguments.

Major Research Essay

Due: Tuesday 2 May
Weighting: 40%

This assessment consists of an 1800-2000 word research essay. The word length excludes footnotes and bibliography. Essay topics will be uploaded onto ilearn early in the semester. Essays will be graded using the Discipline of Politics and International Relations' Grade Criteria and Rubric document, which will be uploaded onto ilearn.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Develop the capacity for critical analysis.
  • Develop and apply research skills that enable students to provide evidence to support their arguments.
  • Develop the skill to write cogently and to structure arguments in a logical order.
  • Encourage students to become engaged with the key issues and challenges that are currently facing the world.
  • Encourage students to see themselves as agents of positive change.
  • Understand and explain the key concepts, theories, methods, and issues relevant to the study of International Relations at an introductory level.
  • Identify and understand the defining debates in the field of Global Politics.

Formal Examination

Due: Formal examination period
Weighting: 30%

Students will take a two-hour (plus 10 minutes reading time) closed book, paper-based final exam paper during the formal examination period. Students are not allowed to bring mobile phones and other electronic devices, notes, course materials, books, and dictionaries (paper/electronic) into the examination room. This is an individual assessment task and will cover topics discussed in week 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13. 

This is a formal exam and will be held during the examination period (12 June to 30 June 2017). The exact date and time of the exam will be released by the university during the mid-semester recess. Students must ensure that they are available to take the exam on any day during the exam period. If students miss the final exam, they should refer to the Disruption to Studies policy below. 

Details of the structure and format of the paper will be released on ilearn by the mid-semester recess. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Develop the capacity for critical analysis.
  • Develop the skill to write cogently and to structure arguments in a logical order.
  • Understand and explain the key concepts, theories, methods, and issues relevant to the study of International Relations at an introductory level.
  • Identify and understand the defining debates in the field of Global Politics.

Delivery and Resources

Lectures and Tutorials

Please consult the timetable for details of the lectures and tutorials for each week: https://timetables.mq.edu.au/2017/Reports/List.aspx

Two one hour lectures have been scheduled each week. However, please consult ilearn for variations from week to week. 

Tutorials are 1 hour in length. 

Textbook

The following textbook will be used in this course and is required for purchase: 

Lawson, S. (2017). International Relations (3rd Ed) Cambridge MA: Polity Press (ISBN: 9781509508563)

Please ensure that you buy the latest 2017 edition. Copies have been ordered for the Co-op Bookshop located on campus. 

Additional required readings will be available through the library and ilearn. 

Technologies Used

This unit has an online presence in ilearn. Students will require access to reliable broadband and a computer. Students must login to this site, and also their student email account each week. 

To login go to: https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/login/index.php 

Tutoring Staff

TBA

 

Unit Schedule

Week 1 - An Introduction to the study of Global Politics

Week beginning 27 February 

Week 2 - The Historical Context: Political Systems in World History

Week beginning 6 March

Week 3 - The Historical Context: IR in the Twentieth Century

Week beginning 13 March

Week 4 - Theories of International Relations

Week beginning 20 March 

Week 5 - Essay Writing and Research Skills

Week beginning 27 March

QUIZ - Thursday 30 March

Week 6 - Security and Insecurity

Week beginning 3 April. 

ESSAY PLAN DUE Friday 7 April

Week 7 - The Global Governance Challenge

Week beginning 10 April

MID-SEMESTER RECESS - 17 April to 31 April 

Week 8 - No lecture or tutorials

Week beginning 1 May. 

MAJOR ESSAY DUE Tuesday 2 May

Week 9 - International Political Economy

Week beginning 8 May

Week 10 - Religion and Culture in Global Politics

Week beginning​ 15 May

Week 11 - Great Power Transitions

Week beginning 22 May

Week 12 - Globalisation and the Study of International Relations

Week beginning​ 29 May

Week 13 - Concluding Comments

Week beginning 5 June

Exam period commences: 12 June

FINAL EXAM on date set by the registrar

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop the capacity for critical analysis.
  • Develop and apply research skills that enable students to provide evidence to support their arguments.
  • Develop the skill to write cogently and to structure arguments in a logical order.

Assessment tasks

  • Essay Plan
  • Major Research Essay

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop the skill to write cogently and to structure arguments in a logical order.
  • Understand and explain the key concepts, theories, methods, and issues relevant to the study of International Relations at an introductory level.

Assessment tasks

  • Class Participation
  • Major Research Essay
  • Formal Examination

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Encourage students to see themselves as agents of positive change.

Assessment tasks

  • Class Participation
  • Essay Plan
  • Major Research Essay
  • Formal Examination

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Encourage students to become engaged with the key issues and challenges that are currently facing the world.
  • Understand and explain the key concepts, theories, methods, and issues relevant to the study of International Relations at an introductory level.
  • Identify and understand the defining debates in the field of Global Politics.

Assessment tasks

  • Class Participation
  • Quiz
  • Major Research Essay
  • Formal Examination

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop the capacity for critical analysis.
  • Develop the skill to write cogently and to structure arguments in a logical order.
  • Identify and understand the defining debates in the field of Global Politics.

Assessment tasks

  • Class Participation
  • Quiz
  • Essay Plan
  • Major Research Essay
  • Formal Examination

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Encourage students to see themselves as agents of positive change.

Assessment tasks

  • Class Participation
  • Major Research Essay

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Encourage students to become engaged with the key issues and challenges that are currently facing the world.
  • Encourage students to see themselves as agents of positive change.

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Encourage students to become engaged with the key issues and challenges that are currently facing the world.

Assessment tasks

  • Class Participation
  • Major Research Essay