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BBA 320 – Asian Business Environment

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Alexander Blair
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E4A 418
TBA
Tutor
Stephanie Brooks
Contact via email
TBA
TBA
Stephanie Brooks
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
27cp at 100 level or above including ((ECON110 or ECON111) and (6cp in Commerce designated units at 200 level))
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit is an introduction to the economies of East and South-East Asia, and especially their key commercial and economic institutions. It covers the entire region but focuses on the People's Republic of China, South Korea, and Japan as exemplars of the economic characteristics and commercial practices in the region. Students will study institutions such as the Korean chaebol and Chinese gufen and TVEs, as well as management styles and practices, marketing strategies, and key cultural mores such as guanxi. Students will be given a working knowledge of the path to economic development taken by the Asian economies as a means of understanding their economic and business behaviour today. The unit also explores the causes of the economic problems that have faced the region in the last two decades, and the problems and opportunities likely to be encountered in decades to come. The unit requires no prior knowledge; any economic theory or other concepts will be taught within the curriculum. It will be useful to business and marketing students, and also fits well into the set of development economics units offered by the Faculty.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Understand the characteristics and business institutions of the economies of East and Southeast Asia.
  2. Problem solving: apply economic theory to analyse the development strategy and growth path that created these economic and business institutions.
  3. Critical thinking: be able to critically evaluate the policy prescriptions put forward in contemporary political-economic debates.
  4. Communication: be able to express ideas clearly and succinctly both verbally and in written format.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Mid-semester test 30% Week 7
Essay 25% November 3rd 8pm
Presentation 15% Week 9 - Week 13
Final Examination 30% University Examination Period

Mid-semester test

Due: Week 7
Weighting: 30%

This will be held in the lecture during Week 7, and will be of one hour and forty minutes duration.  This is a short answer test based on the lectures and reading materials covered in Weeks 2-6.  This is a very important assessment; it will allow you to demonstrate your grasp of the core material of the Unit, and to accomplish many of the Unit's objectives.   This is a Hurdle assessment.  Students whose result is deemed unsatisfactory will be required to undertake a second task. 

Students who are absent for the mid-term test will score zero for this task. This penalty does not apply for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies (DTS) has been made and approved. If approved, policy allows for the provision of one additional assessment task. This task need not be the same as the missed assessment. It could be a test, essay or oral task. In submitting a DTS, the student is agreeing to make themselves available so that they can complete any extra work as required. The time and date, deadline or format of any required extra assessable work is not negotiable. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the characteristics and business institutions of the economies of East and Southeast Asia.

Essay

Due: November 3rd 8pm
Weighting: 25%

The due date for this assessment is 3rd November, 8pm.  The essay is to be submitted using the Turnitin link via the iLearn Unit page.  Essays must be at least 2000 words, excluding references.  They need not be significantly longer than this, and must not exceed 2,200 words.  

Essays submitted by 3rd October will be returned with a grade and full comments.  In addition, this will give you feedback on your progress, and make it much easier for you to prepare for your presentation task. It is recommended, therefore, that students should aim to submit the Essay by the earlier date.  Note: For work submitted between 3rd October and 3rd November, feedback may not be available to help you in time for your presentation.

Topics will be available in Week 3 via a handout on iLearn, and the handout will include also an essay writing guide. This is a skills exercise, rather than just a means of accumulating marks, and essay skills such as citation of sources and correct presentation of references will be emphasised.  The Essay Guide will help with these skills. 

After submitting the Essay, you will then defend your argument in a Presentation to the class in tutorial time.  You will present as a group along with other students who attempted the same question, although your work and your mark will be your own.   This is a PechaKucha style presentation, of no more than 3 1/2 minutes, with a technology of your choice as long as the presentation can be contained within the strict time limit.  All presentations will be scheduled in the second half of Session, in Weeks 9 to 13, with the timing depending on your choice of question.  If you have submitted the Essay by the recommended date, then you will have the benefit of the comments on the Essay in refining your Presentation.  For more details see the section on the Presentation. 

If the Essay is submitted after the recommended date, it  will not be possible to return it with comments or a mark to help with your Presentation. This will be a substantial disadvantage to you, and students should aim to submit the Essay by the  earlier date.

Essays will be accepted only up until 3rd November at 8pm, after which it will receive a mark of zero. No extensions will be granted. There will be a deduction of 10% of the total available marks made from the total awarded mark for each 24 hour period or part thereof that the submission is late (for example, 25 hours late in submission – 20% penalty).  This penalty does not apply for cases in which a Disruptions to Study application was made and approved. Policy allows for the provision of one additional assessment task. This task need not be the same as the missed assessment. It could be a homework, essay or oral task. In submitting a DTS, the student is agreeing to make themselves available so that they can complete any extra work as required. The time and date, deadline or format of any required extra assessable work is not negotiable. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the characteristics and business institutions of the economies of East and Southeast Asia.
  • Problem solving: apply economic theory to analyse the development strategy and growth path that created these economic and business institutions.
  • Critical thinking: be able to critically evaluate the policy prescriptions put forward in contemporary political-economic debates.
  • Communication: be able to express ideas clearly and succinctly both verbally and in written format.

Presentation

Due: Week 9 - Week 13
Weighting: 15%

Presentations will be made as part of a group, but every student will receive an individual mark independent of the other members of their group.  The Presentations will take place in tutorial during Weeks 9 - 13.  Administrative arrangements will be discussed in the first tutorial in Week 2.  Your task will be to defend the argument you made on your chosen Essay topic.  If your Essay was submitted by the recommended date, then you will have the benefit of the comments made on it, in refining your argument.  This is a PechaKucha presentation with a strict (3 1/2 minutes) time limit.  You will be supported by a technology (such as Powerpoint) of your choice.  Again, you will present as part of a group, and coordinate such choices with them, but the comments and mark will be your own.  As well as giving students an opportunity to earn marks, this is intended as a skills exercise, an opportunity to practice and hone skills that are crucial for both academic and business purposes.  Students who are absent during their alloted tutorial Presentation, will receive zero for this task. This penalty does not apply for cases in which an application for disruption to studies is made and approved. When an application for DTS has been approved, policy allows for the provision of one additional assessment task. This task need not be the same as the missed assessment. It could be an individual, group, homework, essay or oral task. In submitting a DTS, the student is agreeing to make themselves available so that they can complete any extra work as required. The time and date, deadline or format of any required extra assessable work is not negotiable. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the characteristics and business institutions of the economies of East and Southeast Asia.
  • Problem solving: apply economic theory to analyse the development strategy and growth path that created these economic and business institutions.
  • Communication: be able to express ideas clearly and succinctly both verbally and in written format.

Final Examination

Due: University Examination Period
Weighting: 30%

The Final Exam will be of 2.5 hours duration, and will consist of a mix of short answer (as seen already in the Mid-Session Test) and essay-style answer questions.  A guide to the Final Examination will be available from Week 10 via iLearn.  Students who experience misadventure which prevents them from attending the Final Examination, should complete a Disruption to  Studies application.  If this application meets the criteria set out in University guidelines, then the student may be offered a Supplementary Examination on the day and time timetabled by the University.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the characteristics and business institutions of the economies of East and Southeast Asia.
  • Problem solving: apply economic theory to analyse the development strategy and growth path that created these economic and business institutions.
  • Critical thinking: be able to critically evaluate the policy prescriptions put forward in contemporary political-economic debates.
  • Communication: be able to express ideas clearly and succinctly both verbally and in written format.

Delivery and Resources

Classes

  • This unit provides 3 hours face-to-face teaching per week consisting of 1 x 2 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour tutorial

Class times and other information can be found via the link below.  It will be possible to attempt changes to your timetable in the first two weeks of Session, though the class of your choice may not be available if it is fully enrolled.

http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/timetables

 

Recommended Texts and/or Materials

There is no textbook that completely covers the ground we wish to look at, and very few try.  Some texts are useful, but in the main we will rely upon academic journal articles and upon handouts on specific topics to supplement the lectures. Specific reading suggestions will be made available via iLearn and you will be shown how to make use of the resources available in the University Library.  For most purposes, the lectures and tutorial readings will cover most of what is needed for the Unit.

 

Technology Used and Required

Unit Web Page

Lecture and tutorial material as well as up to date information concerning any aspect of the unit, including any changes to the schedule, will be available to students by logging on to iLearn at http://ilearn.mq.edu.au.    Powerpoint or other presentation software is useful though not essential for the Class Presentation exercise.  MS Word or compatible software is necessary for the Essay.

 

Core knowledge as an essential outcome of the Unit

This is a Unit in Asian studies, and there is a core of essential knowledge relevant to Asian business and commerce that the student must have absorbed at the completion of the Unit.  This essential knowledge has been carefully chosen and is not excessive, and can be readily mastered in the time available to the student, but a Passing grade in the Unit will not be possible without it.  This core knowledge will be listed in Guides, for example to the Mid-Session and the Final Exam, so that there will be no doubt as to the core knowledge that the student needs to acquire.  The Presentation and Essay are exercises designed to add to and hone the students' skillsets, but they will also assist in mastering the relevant material.  Examples of the type of material that will be covered, and the means with which it will be assessed, will be discussed in the first lecture as well as subsequent Guides. 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Academic Honesty

The nature of scholarly endeavour, dependent as it is on the work of others, binds all members of the University community to abide by the principles of academic honesty. Its fundamental principle is that all staff and students act with integrity in the creation, development, application and use of ideas and information. This means that:

  • all academic work claimed as original is the work of the author making the claim
  • all academic collaborations are acknowledged
  • academic work is not falsified in any way
  • when the ideas of others are used, these ideas are acknowledged appropriately.

Further information on the academic honesty can be found in the Macquarie University Academic Honesty Policy at http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Grades

Macquarie University uses the following grades in coursework units of study:

  • HD - High Distinction
  • D - Distinction
  • CR - Credit
  • P - Pass
  • F - Fail

Grade descriptors and other information concerning grading are contained in the Macquarie University Grading Policy which is available at:

http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/grading/policy.html

Grading Appeals and Final Examination Script Viewing

If, at the conclusion of the unit, you have performed below expectations, and are considering lodging an appeal of grade and/or viewing your final exam script please refer to the following website which provides information about these processes and the cut off dates in the first instance. Please read the instructions provided concerning what constitutes a valid grounds for appeal before appealing your grade.

http://www.businessandeconomics.mq.edu.au/new_and_current_students/undergraduate_current_students/how_do_i/grade_appeals/

 

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the characteristics and business institutions of the economies of East and Southeast Asia.
  • Problem solving: apply economic theory to analyse the development strategy and growth path that created these economic and business institutions.
  • Critical thinking: be able to critically evaluate the policy prescriptions put forward in contemporary political-economic debates.

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the characteristics and business institutions of the economies of East and Southeast Asia.
  • Problem solving: apply economic theory to analyse the development strategy and growth path that created these economic and business institutions.

Assessment tasks

  • Mid-semester test
  • Essay
  • Final Examination

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Critical thinking: be able to critically evaluate the policy prescriptions put forward in contemporary political-economic debates.

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Final Examination

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment task

  • Presentation

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Communication: be able to express ideas clearly and succinctly both verbally and in written format.

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Presentation
  • Final Examination