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AHIS170 – Egyptian Archaeology: An Introduction

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Alex Woods
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W6A 532
Wednesday 11-1pm
Unit Convenor
Ronika Power
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W6A 524
Tutor
Eve Guerry
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Tutor
Emma Magro
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Tutor
Jacinta Carruthers
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Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit explores the development of ancient Egyptian civilisation from the prehistoric period to the end of the New Kingdom as reflected in the archaeological record. Settlements, temples, tombs and associated material culture are analysed to understand the daily life and religious beliefs of the ancient Egyptians over 2500 years of Pharaonic history. The unit also draws on the experience of extensive fieldwork by Macquarie University staff in Egypt. Students gain a solid understanding of the geography, chronology and archaeology of ancient Egypt as a basis for further specialized study in the discipline.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Acquire knowledge of the geography, chronology and significant developments from the Predynastic to New Kingdom periods.
  2. Acquire knowledge of archaeological data of Egyptian settlements, tombs, temples and associated material culture from the Predynastic to New Kingdom periods from published primary sources.
  3. Describe, compare and analyse an ancient Egyptian artefact.
  4. Analyse and critique primary and secondary sources, illustrating basic skills in research, the ability to write effectively, communicate orally and reflect on the learning experience.
  5. Present written work to a high standard, with relevant footnoting and accurate bibliographies.
  6. Gain a life-long ability to enjoy the study of the archaeology of ancient Egypt and an inability to forget W.M.F. Petrie’s seriation typology to date Egyptian pottery.

General Assessment Information

 

 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Online quiz - Modules 1-5 30% Weeks 2, 5, 7, 9, 13
Documentation exercise 15% Sunday of Week 5 @ 10pm
Object Study 30% Sunday of Week 9 @ 10pm
"Dig Diary" 25% Sunday of Week 12 @ 10pm

Online quiz - Modules 1-5

Due: Weeks 2, 5, 7, 9, 13
Weighting: 30%

Online quiz for each Module – The quizzes will assess your knowledge of the video lectures and in class activities.Question types include multiple choice, matching, and true/false. Time limit: 1 hour. The quiz will go live at 6pm on the Wednesday of the relevant weeks (2, 5, 7, 9, 13) and close at 11.59pm on the Sunday night before the next classYou will not have access to the quiz after this time and you cannot take a ‘make up’ quiz later to catch up. Complete the quiz using the iLearn quiz tool.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Acquire knowledge of the geography, chronology and significant developments from the Predynastic to New Kingdom periods.
  • Acquire knowledge of archaeological data of Egyptian settlements, tombs, temples and associated material culture from the Predynastic to New Kingdom periods from published primary sources.
  • Gain a life-long ability to enjoy the study of the archaeology of ancient Egypt and an inability to forget W.M.F. Petrie’s seriation typology to date Egyptian pottery.

Documentation exercise

Due: Sunday of Week 5 @ 10pm
Weighting: 15%

A very short exercise designed to ensure that students are familiar with the desired mode of presenting evidence and documenting an academic paper. Word limit: 300 Words. Submit via Turnitin.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Analyse and critique primary and secondary sources, illustrating basic skills in research, the ability to write effectively, communicate orally and reflect on the learning experience.
  • Present written work to a high standard, with relevant footnoting and accurate bibliographies.
  • Gain a life-long ability to enjoy the study of the archaeology of ancient Egypt and an inability to forget W.M.F. Petrie’s seriation typology to date Egyptian pottery.

Object Study

Due: Sunday of Week 9 @ 10pm
Weighting: 30%

Short paper on ONE (1) ancient Egyptian artefact from the Macquarie University Museum of Ancient Cultures. Resources including MAC database entry, 3D scans and archaeological illustrations and further reading will be provided on the iLearn site. Word limit: 1,000 words. Submit via Turnitin.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Acquire knowledge of the geography, chronology and significant developments from the Predynastic to New Kingdom periods.
  • Acquire knowledge of archaeological data of Egyptian settlements, tombs, temples and associated material culture from the Predynastic to New Kingdom periods from published primary sources.
  • Describe, compare and analyse an ancient Egyptian artefact.
  • Analyse and critique primary and secondary sources, illustrating basic skills in research, the ability to write effectively, communicate orally and reflect on the learning experience.
  • Present written work to a high standard, with relevant footnoting and accurate bibliographies.
  • Gain a life-long ability to enjoy the study of the archaeology of ancient Egypt and an inability to forget W.M.F. Petrie’s seriation typology to date Egyptian pottery.

"Dig Diary"

Due: Sunday of Week 12 @ 10pm
Weighting: 25%

Students are required to document their learning and complete a "Dig Diary" in Weeks 2, 6, 8 (3 weeks total) on a directed topic, which will be relevant to either the weekly readings, video lectures or in class activities. Word Limit: 100-300 words and/or evidence of completion of relevant activity. Submission: Download the template in iLearn for Weeks 2, 6, 8 and submit via the Assignment tool by each Sunday at 10pm. Then submit a final compilation of ALL 4 entries in ONE Word or PDF file by Sunday of Week 12 by 10pm via Turnitin. Each individual entry may be edited and submitted in Week 12.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Analyse and critique primary and secondary sources, illustrating basic skills in research, the ability to write effectively, communicate orally and reflect on the learning experience.
  • Gain a life-long ability to enjoy the study of the archaeology of ancient Egypt and an inability to forget W.M.F. Petrie’s seriation typology to date Egyptian pottery.

Delivery and Resources

KICKSTART

This unit includes a KickStart package, designed to help you get a head start with your studies. Being well prepared can be the key to success, so be sure to take advantage of KickStart and make it work for you.

What is it?

KickStart is a package of resources and activities in iLearn that is specific to studying this unit. Your package may include welcome videos from the Unit Convenor, quizzes (not counting toward your final grade), insights from industry experts and tips from previous students on how to succeed in the unit.

When is it available?

One week before the start of the session, log into iLearn and access the KickStart package.

Please note that the activities in the KickStart package do not count towards the final grade of the unit.

UNIT REQUIREMENTS AND EXPECTATIONS

This unit will be structured following a Flipped classroom model, which describes a reversal of traditional teaching where students gain first exposure to new material outside of class, usually via reading or lecture videos, and then class time is used to do the harder work of assimilating that knowledge through strategies such as problem-solving, discussion or debates.

There are 3 hours of face to face instruction: A 1 hour seminar and a 1 hour tutorial.

  • Students are expected to attend all classes (lectures and tutorials), unless there are extenuating circumstances such as illness etc. A log will be taken to record attendance. 
  • For lecture times and classrooms please consult the MQ Timetable website: http://www.timetables.mq.edu.au. This website will display up-to-date information on your classes and classroom locations.

iLearn will play a pivotal role throughout the session and it will be your central hub for information and instructions. Each week will be structured as follows:

BEFORE CLASS | 

  • Watch video lectures and take notes in preparation for class and your Module Quizzes;
  • Complete short and specialised readings in preparation for class;

DURING CLASS | 

  • Engage with your peers in small groups (tutorial teams) and complete the weekly activities listed on iLearn;

AFTER CLASS | 

  • When prompted at the end of selected classes, post the content created in class in your "Dig Diary" to be submitted at the end of session;
  • When prompted at the end of each Module, answer a series of questions on the reading/video lecture content in an Online quiz.

 Students must achieve an overall mark of 50% or above to complete this unit satisfactorily.

REQUIRED AND RECOMMENDED TEXTS AND/OR MATERIALS

There are no required textbooks for this unit. All reading materials will be provided through the MQ library. However the following texts are recommended:

  • Baines J. and Malek, J., Cultural Atlas of Ancient Egypt (New York, 2000, rev. edition).
  • Cullen, J., How to Read, Write, and Think about History (Malden, Oxford ,2013).
  • Renfrew, C. and Bahn, P., Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Practice (London, 2012).
  • Schulz, R. and Seidel, M. (eds), Egypt. The World of the Pharaohs (Cologne, 2004). ** Strongly recommended.
  • Shaw, I., Ancient Egypt: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford, New York, 2004). ** Strongly recommended.
  • Shaw, I. and Nicholson, P., The British Museum Dictionary of Ancient Egypt (London, 2008).
  • Wilkinson, R.H. (ed.), Egyptology Today (Cambridge, New York, 2008)

All booklets from the Shire Egyptology Series, such as:

  • Hall, R., Egyptian textiles (Aylesbury, 1989).
  • Hope, C., Egyptian Pottery (Aylesbury, 2001).
  • Nicholson, P., Egyptian Faience and Glass (Buckinghamshire, 1993).
  • Robins, G., Egyptian Statues (Princes Risborough, 2001).
  • Stewart, H.M., Egyptian Shabtis (Buckinghamshire, 1995).
  • Taylor, J.H., Egyptian Coffins (Aylesbury, 1989).
  • Uphill, E.P., Egyptian Towns and Cities (Aylesbury, 1988).

Most of these texts are available for purchase at the Co-Op bookstore (http://www.coop-bookshop.com.au)

UNIT WEBPAGE AND TECHNOLOGY USED AND REQUIRED

This unit will use iLearn: https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/login/MQ/

IMPORTANT: All students are required to bring a device to class (mobile phones are not sufficient). If you do not have access to a device, please contact the convenor. 

PC and Internet access are required. Basic computer skills (e.g., internet browsing) and skills in word processing are also a requirement. Please consult teaching staff for any further, more specific requirements.

 

Unit Schedule

Week

Module

Lecture topic

Tutorial topic

Assessment

1

Module 1:

Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology

What is Egyptian archaeology?

Introduction to AHIS170

  • Unit guide Online Quiz (non-assessable)

2

Ancient Egyptian chronology,  geography and society

Introduction to the MAC

  • Dig Diary entry
  • Module 1 - Online quiz

3

Module 2:

Predynastic and Early Dynastic Egypt

Egypt at its Origins: Overview of chronological developments

Introduction to handling artefacts

 

4

Daily life - Introduction to Material culture and settlement archaeology

Ancient Egyptian Ceramics

 

5

Afterlife - Introduction to Burial customs and beliefs

How to describe an artefact: Applying observation skills

  • Module 2 - Online Quiz
  • Documentation exercise Due

6

Module 3:

Old Kingdom Egypt

Pyramids and Tombs

How to analyse an artefact: Locating and using paralells

  • Dig Diary entry
7   Settlement archaeology and religion NO TUTORIAL
  • Module 3 - Online Quiz

MID-SEMESTER BREAK

8

Module 4:

Middle Kingdom Egypt

Pyramids and Tombs

Principles of Egyptian art

  • Dig Diary entry

9

Settlement archaeology and religion

Methods of Epigraphy and recording

  • Module 4 - Online Quiz
  • Object Study due

10

Module 5:

New Kingdom Egypt

Daily life

NO TUTORIAL

 

11

Temples

Amulets and Personal Piety

 

12

Tombs

Shabtis and Faience

  • Compiled Dig Diary due

13

Curator's Choice Exhibition

Funerary beliefs, mummies and mummification

  • Module 5 - Online Quiz

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Gain a life-long ability to enjoy the study of the archaeology of ancient Egypt and an inability to forget W.M.F. Petrie’s seriation typology to date Egyptian pottery.

Assessment tasks

  • Online quiz - Modules 1-5
  • Documentation exercise
  • Object Study
  • "Dig Diary"

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Acquire knowledge of the geography, chronology and significant developments from the Predynastic to New Kingdom periods.
  • Acquire knowledge of archaeological data of Egyptian settlements, tombs, temples and associated material culture from the Predynastic to New Kingdom periods from published primary sources.
  • Gain a life-long ability to enjoy the study of the archaeology of ancient Egypt and an inability to forget W.M.F. Petrie’s seriation typology to date Egyptian pottery.

Assessment tasks

  • Documentation exercise
  • "Dig Diary"

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Acquire knowledge of the geography, chronology and significant developments from the Predynastic to New Kingdom periods.
  • Acquire knowledge of archaeological data of Egyptian settlements, tombs, temples and associated material culture from the Predynastic to New Kingdom periods from published primary sources.
  • Gain a life-long ability to enjoy the study of the archaeology of ancient Egypt and an inability to forget W.M.F. Petrie’s seriation typology to date Egyptian pottery.

Assessment tasks

  • Online quiz - Modules 1-5
  • Documentation exercise
  • Object Study
  • "Dig Diary"

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Acquire knowledge of the geography, chronology and significant developments from the Predynastic to New Kingdom periods.
  • Acquire knowledge of archaeological data of Egyptian settlements, tombs, temples and associated material culture from the Predynastic to New Kingdom periods from published primary sources.
  • Describe, compare and analyse an ancient Egyptian artefact.
  • Analyse and critique primary and secondary sources, illustrating basic skills in research, the ability to write effectively, communicate orally and reflect on the learning experience.
  • Present written work to a high standard, with relevant footnoting and accurate bibliographies.
  • Gain a life-long ability to enjoy the study of the archaeology of ancient Egypt and an inability to forget W.M.F. Petrie’s seriation typology to date Egyptian pottery.

Assessment task

  • "Dig Diary"

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe, compare and analyse an ancient Egyptian artefact.
  • Analyse and critique primary and secondary sources, illustrating basic skills in research, the ability to write effectively, communicate orally and reflect on the learning experience.

Assessment tasks

  • Online quiz - Modules 1-5
  • Documentation exercise
  • Object Study
  • "Dig Diary"

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe, compare and analyse an ancient Egyptian artefact.
  • Analyse and critique primary and secondary sources, illustrating basic skills in research, the ability to write effectively, communicate orally and reflect on the learning experience.
  • Present written work to a high standard, with relevant footnoting and accurate bibliographies.

Assessment tasks

  • Online quiz - Modules 1-5
  • Documentation exercise
  • Object Study
  • "Dig Diary"

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe, compare and analyse an ancient Egyptian artefact.
  • Analyse and critique primary and secondary sources, illustrating basic skills in research, the ability to write effectively, communicate orally and reflect on the learning experience.
  • Gain a life-long ability to enjoy the study of the archaeology of ancient Egypt and an inability to forget W.M.F. Petrie’s seriation typology to date Egyptian pottery.

Assessment task

  • "Dig Diary"

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Acquire knowledge of the geography, chronology and significant developments from the Predynastic to New Kingdom periods.
  • Acquire knowledge of archaeological data of Egyptian settlements, tombs, temples and associated material culture from the Predynastic to New Kingdom periods from published primary sources.
  • Describe, compare and analyse an ancient Egyptian artefact.
  • Analyse and critique primary and secondary sources, illustrating basic skills in research, the ability to write effectively, communicate orally and reflect on the learning experience.
  • Present written work to a high standard, with relevant footnoting and accurate bibliographies.

Assessment tasks

  • Online quiz - Modules 1-5
  • Documentation exercise
  • Object Study

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe, compare and analyse an ancient Egyptian artefact.
  • Analyse and critique primary and secondary sources, illustrating basic skills in research, the ability to write effectively, communicate orally and reflect on the learning experience.

Assessment tasks

  • Online quiz - Modules 1-5
  • Documentation exercise
  • Object Study
  • "Dig Diary"

Assignment submission and extensions

ASSIGNMENT SUBMISSION

All written work must be submitted through the iLearn website. Please upload your assignment to the drop-box for the relevant task. Save your assignment as a pdf or a doc file (a pdf is best; please do not use docx). All assignments must include the following at the start:

  • Student name;
  • Student Number;
  • Assessment Task Title or Question.

Any assignment submitted without these will not be marked.

The documentation exercise, object study and Dig Diary (final submission) will be returned via the ‘turnitin’ tool on the iLearn Unit site, and will contain feedback from the marker within them. Information about how to submit work online can be accessed through the iLearn unit.

The online quizzes will be undertaken using the iLearn quiz tool.

MARKING RUBRICS

The documentation exercise, object study and Dig Diary will be graded using a rubric, which can be found on the iLearn site. 

RELEASE OF RESULTS

The convener will aim to return your assignments within 3 weeks of the due date. Results can be viewed via iLearn using the Gradebook tool.

EXAMINATIONS

There is no formal examination in this unit.

EXTENSIONS AND DISRUPTION TO STUDIES

  • Extensions can only be granted in exceptional cases and may only be sought in consultation with the unit convenor and with support of documentary evidence. If you anticipate any difficulty in meeting assigned due dates then it is important that you contact the unit's convenor as early as possible.
  • Please avoid asking for extensions as missing deadlines complicates the work of markers and puts you behind. If you have to ask for an extension, request it before the deadline. Excuses such as ‘Getting behind with your work’ or 'I had other deadlines' do not count.

IMPORTANT PENALTIES TO BE APPLIED:

  • Written assessment tasks submitted after the due date without good reasons will be penalised by a deduction of 2% a day (including weekends) of the mark gained. After five days, a mark of 0% will be assigned.
  • Written assessment tasks submitted that are under or over the word length by more than 15% will be penalised with a 10% deduction. The marker will only read to the listed word limit, i.e. if the word limit is 1000 words they will stop reading at 1000 words (plus or minus up to 150 words).

  • Written assessment tasks submitted without proper referencing, i.e. few or no page numbers or no bibliography, will be marked according to the Macquarie University Plagiarism Policy and the schedule of penalties, including one of the following: reduced mark for the assessment task; required resubmission with reduced maximum mark; issuance of a caution or an automatic fail.

EXTENSION REQUEST PROCEDURE

The granting of extensions is subject to the University's Disruptions Policy: http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html.

Disruption to Studies

If you require an extension, you will be required to submit a 'Disruption to Studies' Notification. Please follow the procedure below:

  1. Visit https://ask.mq.edu.au/account/forms/display/disruptions and use your OneID to log in.
  2. Select your unit code from the drop down list and fill in your relevant details. Note: A notification needs to be submitted for each unit you believe is affected by the disruption.
  3. Click "Submit form".
  4. Attach supporting documents by clicking 'Add a note/attachment', click 'browse' and navigating to the files you want to attach, then click 'submit note' to send your notification and supporting documents
  5. Please keep copies of your original documents, as they may be requested in the future as part of the assessment process.

Please ensure that supporting documentation is included with your request. Notify your convenor via your iLearn dialogue box if you are submitting a 'Disruption to Studies' Notification. Your request will be considered once all the documentation has been received. If you have issues, please contact your convenor via the dialogue tool immediately.

Disruption to Studies

DISRUPTION TO STUDIES POLICY

<http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html>

This Policy applies only to serious and unavoidable disruptions that arise after a study period has commenced. Such disruptions commonly result from personal, social or domestic circumstances and may include illness (either physical or psychological), accident, injury, societal demands (such as jury service), bereavement, family breakdown or unexpected changes in employment situations.

Notification of Disruption to Studies

In order to support students who have experienced serious and unavoidable disruption, the University will provide affected students with an additional opportunity to demonstrate that they have met the learning outcomes of a unit.

An additional opportunity provided under such circumstances is referred to as Special Consideration. Special Consideration will be granted after careful evaluation of evidence supporting a notification for disruption to studies.

DISRUPTION TO STUDIES NOTIFICATION

It is a student’s responsibility to notify the University of their circumstances. All students of the University have the right to provide notification of a disruption to studies.

A student may notify the University of a disruption to their studies regardless of whether the disruption meets the serious and unavoidable criteria.

To be eligible for Special Consideration, a student must notify the University of a serious and unavoidable disruption within five (5) working days of the commencement of the disruption (Disruption to Studies notification).  

All Disruption to Studies notifications are to be made online via the University’s Ask MQ system.

Students granted a Disruption to Studies may by awarded an Incomplete Grade in first session results released in mid-July.

Short Bibliography and resources list

The following is an abbreviated guide to approved web resources as well as primary and secondary works. A complete list can be found in the Egyptology Toolbox on iLearn: http://ilearn.mq.edu.au

Some material, such as excerpts from books and journal articles, will be put on the library's E‐Reserve and can be found via searching AHIS170 in multisearch – unit readings: http://www.mq.edu.au/on_campus/library/

 

Bibliographical aids, for information and references

In order to find the right books or articles, you can try this: International Association of Egyptologists, Annual Egyptological Bibliography (Leiden, 1948 ff.). The library holds the license to the on‐line database of this resource (Online Egyptological Bibliography, OEB) with titles to from 1822 to 2002 (roughly 70,000 items), as well as increasing coverage of 2003-2012 (in total over 90,000 items). Access through the library catalogue and databases: http://www.mq.edu.au/on_campus/library/

 

Approved websites with links to other good sites

Please note: as the Internet is open to everyone, there is no control over the content and quality of websites; hence each site depends on the knowledge and academic integrity of the author/s. Many websites cater for children and young adults in secondary schools or for a wider public therefore are not suitable for academic research.

 

General resources

 

Ancient Egypt Web Site http://www.ancient-egypt.co.uk

Australian Centre for Egyptology http://www.egyptology.mq.edu.au/

Egyptology resources http://www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/er/

Egyptologists’ Electronic Forum http://www.egyptologyforum.org/

The British Museum (web resources): http://www.britishmuseum.org/about_us/departments/ancient_egypt_and_sudan/subject-related_web_resources.aspx

 

Databases and e-resources

 

Aigyptos http://www.aigyptos.uni-muenchen.de

AERA (Ancient Egypt Research Associates) http://www.aeraweb.org

British Museum Studies in Ancient Egypt and Sudan http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/publications/online_journals/bmsaes.aspx

Catalogue général des antiquités égyptiennes du Musée du Caire Online http://www.egyptologyforum.org/EEFCG.html

Deir el-Medina Database http://www.leidenuniv.nl/nino/dmd/dmd.html

Digital Egypt for Universities http://www.digitalegypt.ucl.ac.uk

Egypt Exploration Society Delta Survey http://www.deltasurvey.ees.ac.uk/ds-home.html

Egyptological Book Series Online http://www.egyptologyforum.org/EEFSeries.html

ETANA (Electronic Tools and Ancient Near East Archives): old excavation reports and literature http://www.etana.org

Giza Digital Library http://www.gizapyramids.org/code/emuseum.asp?newpage=library

IFAO (Institut français d’archéologie orientale, Cairo) http://www.ifao.egnet.net/

JSTOR. Searchable database of journal articles (access via MQ library databases:) library.mq.edu.au then search for “JSTOR”.

Osirisnet http://www.osirisnet.net/

Sefkhet Online Resources for Egyptology www.sefkhet.net/Oxford-Net-Res.html

Theban Mapping Project http://www.thebanmappingproject.com/

Tutankhamun: Anatomy of an Excavation, Griffith Institute; www.griffith.ox.ac.uk/tutankhamundiscovery.html)

 

Encyclopaedias of Egyptology

UCLA Encyclopedia of Egyptology http://escholarship.org/uc/nelc_uee

Lloyd, A. B. (ed.) A Companion to Ancient Egypt (Oxford, 2010) Full text available from Blackwell Reference Online - 2010 Collection (access through MQ library multi search)

Redford, D. B., The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt (Oxford, New York 2001). Oxford encyclopedia of ancient Egypt (access through MQ library multi search)

 

Museum web catalogues

Berlin, Egyptian Museum http://www.egyptian-museum-berlin.com/

Boston, Museum of Fine Arts http://www.mfa.org

Cambridge, Fitzwilliam Museum http://www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/dept/ant/egypt/

Chicago, Oriental Institute Museum http://oi.uchicago.edu/museum

Leiden, Rijksmuseum van Oudheden http://www.rmo.nl/english/collection/permanent/egyptians

London, British Museum http://www.britishmuseum.org/default.aspx

London, Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology http://www.petrie.ucl.ac.uk/search/index.html

Manchester Museum http://www.museum.manchester.ac.uk/collection/ancientegypt/

New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art http://www.metmuseum.org/collections/search-the-collections

New York, Brooklyn Museum http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/opencollection/exhibitions/egyptian

Oxford, Ashmolean Museum http://www.ashmolean.org/

Paris, Musée du Louvre http://www.louvre.fr

Turin, Museo Egizio http://www.museoegizio.it/

The Global Egyptian Museum http://www.globalegyptianmuseum.org

 

Periodicals

The following is a short list of periodicals wholly or partly devoted to Egyptology. Articles are usually published in English, French or German. They are all recommended.

 

Archéo-Nil              Revue de la société pour l’étude des cultures prépharaoniques de la vallée du Nil

ASAE                       Annales du Services des Antiquités de l'Égypte

AVDAIK                  Archäologische Veröffentlichungen, Deutschen Archäologisches Institut Abteilung Kairo

BACE                       Bulletin of the Australian Centre for Egyptology

BASOR                    Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research

BES                          Bulletin of the Egyptological Seminar

BIFAO                     Bulletin de l’Institut Français d’Archéologie Orientale

Ch.d'Eg.                  Chronique d'Égypte

DE                           Discussions in Egyptology

GM                          Göttinger Miszellen

JARCE                     Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt

JAOS                       Journal of the American Oriental Society

JEA                          Journal of Egyptian Archaeology

JNES                        Journal of Near Eastern Studies

MDAIK                    Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts Abteilung Kairo

Or.                           Orientalia

RdE                         Revue d'Égyptologie

SAGA                      Studien zur Archäologie und Geschichte Altägyptens

SAK                         Studien zur altägyptischen Kultur

ZAS                         Zeitschrift für ägyptische Sprache und Altertumskunde

 

General

Adams, B., Predynastic Egypt (Aylesbury, 1988).

Adams, B. and Cialowicz, K.M., Protodynastic Egypt (Buckinghamshire, 1997).

Assmann, J. et al. (eds), Problems and Priorities in Egyptian Archaeology (London, 1987).

Baines, J. and Malek, J., An Atlas of Ancient Egypt (Oxford, 1980).

Baines, J. and Malek, J., Cultural Atlas of Ancient Egypt (New York, c. 2000 revised edition).

Bard, K. (ed.), Encyclopedia of the Archaeology of Ancient Egypt (London, 1999).

Bard, K., An Introduction to the Archaeology of Ancient Egypt (Malden, Oxford, Carlton, 2008).

Hornung, E., History of Ancient Egypt: An Introduction (Ithaca and London, 1999).

Kemp, B.J., Ancient Egypt. Anatomy of a Civilisation (London, 1989, 2005).

Murnane, W., The Penguin Guide to Ancient Egypt (Harmondsworth, 1997).

Porter, B., and Moss, R., Topographical Bibliography of Ancient Egyptian HieroglyphiTexts, Reliefs and Paintings, Vols I‐VII (Oxford, 1927 ff/2nd edition Oxford, 1960 ff.).

Petrie, W.M.F. and Quibell, J.E., Naqada and Ballas (London 1896).

Renfrew, C. and Bahn, P., Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Practice (London, 2000, 2004, 2008).

Shaw, I. (ed.), The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt (Oxford, 2003).

Shaw, I. and Nicholson, P., The British Museum Dictionary of Ancient Egypt (London, 1995, 2002, 2008).

Sowada, K.N., Egypt in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Old Kingdom: an Archaeological Perspective, OBO Series 237 (Fribourg/Gottingen, 2009).

Spencer, A.J., Early Egypt: the Rise of Civilization in the Nile Valley (London, 1993).

Teeter, E. (ed.), Before the pyramids : the origins of Egyptian civilization (Chicago, 2011).

Trigger, B.G. et al., Ancient Egypt: A Social History (Cambridge, 1983).

Wengrow, D., Archaeology of Early Egypt: Social Transformations in NorthEast Africa 10,0002650 BC (Cambridge, 2006).

 

Art and Architecture, Urbanisation

Aldred, C., Egyptian Art in the Days of the Pharaohs (London, 1986 and reprints).

Arnold, D., Building in Egypt. Pharaonic Stone Masonry (New York/Oxford, 1991).

Badawy, A., A History of Egyptian Architecture, 3 Vols (Cairo, 1954; Los Angeles, 1966, 1968).

Badawy, A., Architecture in Ancient Egypt and the Near East (Cambridge, Mass., 1966).

Bietak, M., “Urban Archaeology and the 'Town Problem' in Ancient Egypt”, in K. Weeks (ed.), Egyptology and the Social Sciences (Cairo, 1979), 97‐144.

Bietak, M. (ed.), House and Palace – Haus und Palast (Vienna, 1996).

Bourriau, J., Pharaohs and Mortals: Egyptian Art in the Middle Kingdom (Cambridge, 1988).

Butzer, K., Early Hydraulic Civilisations in Egypt: A Study in Cultural Ecology (Chicago, 1976).

Edwards, I.E.S., The Pyramids of Egypt (London, 1961).

Kemp, B.J., “Temple and Town in Ancient Egypt”, in: P.J. Ucko et al. (eds), Man, settlement and urbanism (London, 1972), 657‐680.

Kemp, B.J., “The Early Development of Towns in Ancient Egypt”, Antiquity 51 (1977), 185‐200.

Kemp, B.J., “The City of el‐Amarna as a Source for the Study of Urban Society in Ancient Egypt”, World Archaeology 9 (1977), 123‐139.

Lehner, M., The Complete Pyramids (London, 1997).

Schafer, B.E. (ed.), The Temples of Ancient Egypt (London, 1998).

Shaw, T. et al. (eds), The Archaeology of Africa: Food, Metals and Towns (London, 1993).

Smith, W.S., A History of Egyptian Sculpture and Painting in the Old Kingdom (Harvard, 1946; New York, 1978).)

Smith, W.S., The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt, revised edition by W.K. Simpson (New Haven CT., 1998).

Spencer, J., Brick Architecture in Ancient Egypt (Warminster, 1979).

Vandier, J., Manuel d'archeologie egyptienne, Vols I‐VI (Paris, 1952‐1978).

van den Brink, E.C.M. (ed.), The Archaeology of the Nile Delta, Egypt: Problems and Priorities. Proceedings of the seminar held in Cairo, 1922 October 1986, on the occasion of the fifteenth anniversary of the Netherlands Institute of Archaeology and Arabic Studies in Cairo (Amsterdam, 1988).

van den Brink, E.C.M. (ed.), The Nile Delta in Transition: 4th3rd Millennium BC. Proceedings of the Seminar held in Cairo, 2124 October 1990 at the Netherlands Institute of Archaeology and Arabic Studies (Tel Aviv, 1992).

Wilkinson, R.H., The Complete Temples of Ancient Egypt (London, 2000).

 

Material Culture

Andrews, C., Ancient Egyptian Jewellery (London, 1990).

Arnold, Do. and Bourriau, J., (eds), An Introduction to Ancient Egyptian Pottery (Mainz, 1993).

Aston, B.G., Ancient Egyptian Stone vessels: Materials and Forms (Heidelberg, 1994).

Bourriau, J., Umm elGaab. Pottery from the Nile Valley until the Arab Conquest (Cambridge, 1981).

Crowfoot Payne, J., Catalogue of the Predynastic Egyptian Collection in the Ashmolean Museum (Oxford/New York, 1993).

Hall, R., Ancient Egyptian Textiles (Aylesbury, 1986).

Hope, C., Egyptian Pottery (Aylesbury, 1987).

Killen, G., Ancient Egyptian Furniture, vol. 1 (Warminster 1980).

Köhler, E. C. and Jones, J., Helwan IIThe Early Dynastic and Old Kingdom Relief Slabs, Studien zur Archaeologie und Geschichte Altagyptens (SAGA) 25 (Rahden, 2009).

Lucas, A. and Harris, J.R., Ancient Egyptian Materials and Industries, 4th edition, (London 1962, 1989).

Nicholson, P. and Shaw, I., Ancient Egyptian Materials and Technology (Cambridge, 2000).

Petrie, W.M.F., Scarabs and Cylinders with Names (London, 1917).

Petrie, W.M.F., Corpus of Prehistoric Pottery and Palettes (London, 1921).

Scheel, B., Egyptian Metalworking and Tools (Aylesbury, 1989).

Shaw, I., Egyptian Warfare and Weapons (Aylesbury, 1991).

Sowada, K.N., “Black‐Topped Ware in Early Dynastic Contexts”, Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 85 (1999), 85‐102.

Tiradritti, F. (ed.), Egyptian Treasures from the Egyptian Museum in Cairo (New York, 1999).

Tooley, A., Egyptian Models and Scenes (Aylesbury, 1995).

Wilson, H., Egyptian Food and Drink (Aylesbury, 1988).

 

Funerary Practices

Adams, B., Egyptian Mummies (Aylesbury, 1984).

Crubézy, E., Janin, Th. and Midant-Reynes, B., Adaïma. 2. La nécropole prédynastique (Cairo, 2002).

Gratjetzki, W., Burial customs in ancient Egypt: life in death for rich and poor (London, 2003).

Ikram, S. and Dodson, A., The Mummy in Ancient Egypt (London, 1998).

Jones, J., “New perspectives on the development of mummification and funerary practices during the Pre‐ and Early Dynastic Periods”, in: J‐C. Goyon, C. Cardin, J‐F. Garrel, G. Zaki (eds), IXe Congres International des Egyptologues. 612 Septembre 2004, GrenobleFrance. Resumes des commu: 63 (Grenoble, 2007), 2.1, 979‐989.

Kanawati, N., The Tomb and its Significance in Ancient Egypt (Cairo, 1987).

Kanawati, N., The Tomb and Beyond: Burial Customs of Egyptian Officials (Warminster, c. 2001).

Lehner, M., The Complete Pyramids (London, 1997).

Parker Pearson, M., The Archaeology of Death and Burial (Stroud., 2006)

Richards, J.E., Ancient Egyptian Mortuary Practice and the Study of Socio‐Economic Differentiation, in: J. Lustig (ed.) Anthropology and Egyptology: A developing dialogue (Sheffield, 1997) 33‐42.

Richards, J.E., Society and Death in Ancient Egypt. Mortuary Landscapes of the Middle Kingdom (Cambridge, 2005).

Spencer, J., Death in Ancient Egypt (Harmondsworth, 1982).

Stewart, H.M., Egyptian Shabtis, (Buckinghamshire, 1995).

Taylor, J., Egyptian Coffins (Aylesbury, 1989).

Taylor, J., Death and the Afterlife in Ancient Egypt (London, 2001).

 

Changes since First Published

Date Description
23/02/2017 Update error in unit schedule.
20/02/2017 Error in schedule.