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MHIS121 – After the Black Death: Europe 1348-1789

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Nicholas Baker
Contact via nicholas.baker@mq.edu.au
W6A 412
Wednesday, 11 am-12pm, Friday 2-3 pm
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
In 1348 a horrific pandemic struck the Eurasian landmass. The Black Death killed between one-third and one-half of the European population and threatened the collapse of Western Europe's glittering medieval civilization. This unit explores what happened next. Over the next four-and-one-half centuries, Europe experienced a period of dramatic and enduring change, out which many features of the modern, western world emerged. Beginning with the horrors of the Black Death, this era witnessed the splendour of the Renaissance, violent religious disputes and changes, the challenge of the new world of the Americas, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, and closed with the bloodshed and upheaval of the French Revolution. Students will analyse the multiple and contradictory impulses that shaped Europe and it engagement with the wider world between 1350 and 1800.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Understand and explain the extent to which European life altered between the Middle Ages and the French Revolution.
  2. Analyze and assess the impact that various events, movements, and ideas had on European societies and cultures during the early modern period.
  3. Read, evaluate, and ask questions of a variety of primary source documents.
  4. Synthesize their understanding and analysis into clear, specific, evidence-based, historical arguments presented in grammatically correct writing with appropriate references.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Weekly Quiz 20% Weekly
Document Analysis 20% 27/03/17
Short Paper 20% 01/05/17
Final Synoptic Essay 40% 09/06/17

Weekly Quiz

Due: Weekly
Weighting: 20%

Each week in tutorials from Week 2 onward, students will complete a short, two-question quiz: the first question will address the required readings for that week, the second will address the lecture from the previous day (ie. for Monday tutorials, the previous Friday lecture; for Friday tutorials, the previous Monday lecture). The quiz will be held at the start of each tutorial: students who are late or absent will miss the quiz. Quizzes cannot be made up outside of tutorials. Please note that no accommodation is made for technical or logistical problems with lecture recordings. Internal students are expected to attend lectures in person rather than relying on recordings. Enrollment in iLecture is not recommended for this unit.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand and explain the extent to which European life altered between the Middle Ages and the French Revolution.
  • Read, evaluate, and ask questions of a variety of primary source documents.
  • Synthesize their understanding and analysis into clear, specific, evidence-based, historical arguments presented in grammatically correct writing with appropriate references.

Document Analysis

Due: 27/03/17
Weighting: 20%

A 1,000-word analysis of a primary source as an historical document: to assess and evaluate it usefulness, reliability and limitations for historians in understanding early modern European society and culture. This task requires applies the skills in analysing historical documents that will be practiced in tutorials to a previously unseen document.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Analyze and assess the impact that various events, movements, and ideas had on European societies and cultures during the early modern period.
  • Read, evaluate, and ask questions of a variety of primary source documents.
  • Synthesize their understanding and analysis into clear, specific, evidence-based, historical arguments presented in grammatically correct writing with appropriate references.

Short Paper

Due: 01/05/17
Weighting: 20%

A 1,000-word paper that answers a historical question identified in the Document Analysis.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Analyze and assess the impact that various events, movements, and ideas had on European societies and cultures during the early modern period.
  • Read, evaluate, and ask questions of a variety of primary source documents.
  • Synthesize their understanding and analysis into clear, specific, evidence-based, historical arguments presented in grammatically correct writing with appropriate references.

Final Synoptic Essay

Due: 09/06/17
Weighting: 40%

A  2,000-word synoptic, reflective paper that synthesizes the material covered in the unit into a coherent, big-picture argument in an innovative or creative manner, in answer to one of three assigned topics. Students need to attend all lectures and complete all the assigned weekly readings to complete the essay successfully.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand and explain the extent to which European life altered between the Middle Ages and the French Revolution.
  • Analyze and assess the impact that various events, movements, and ideas had on European societies and cultures during the early modern period.
  • Read, evaluate, and ask questions of a variety of primary source documents.
  • Synthesize their understanding and analysis into clear, specific, evidence-based, historical arguments presented in grammatically correct writing with appropriate references.

Delivery and Resources

Required and Recommended Texts

Required Texts

The text is required and is available for purchase from the University Co-Op Bookshop. It is also available in both hard-copy and e-version via the MQ Library.

1. The European World, 1500-1800: An Introduction to Early Modern History, ed. Beat Kümin, Second ed. (London & New York, 2014)

2. Students will also read a variety of primary source documents available electronically through the MQ Library. Due to Faculty of Arts policy, printed unit readers are no longer provided so students are expected to print out these documents and bring them to class in hard copy for close reading, analysis, and other activities.

Recommended Readings

The following general, introductory texts are available on Reserve in the University Library and are highly recommended for additional reading.

Euan Cameron ed. Early Modern Europe: An Oxford History (Oxford, 1999)

Johann Huizinga The Autumn of the Middle Ages (Chicago, 1996)

George Huppert After the Black Death: A Social History of Early Modern Europe, 2nd ed. (Bloomington, 1998)

Merry Wiesner-Hanks Early Modern Europe, 1450-1789 (Cambridge, 2006)

 

Technologies Used and Required

This unit uses iLearn. All students are expected to have internet access and use of a computer. All students are expected to have basic computer skills (such as use of email, word processing, and web browsing).

 

Unit Schedule

Week 1 The Medieval Legacy
Week 2 A Century of Crisis
Week 3 Renaissance
Week 4 The Natural World
Week 5 New Worlds
Week 6 The Sacred and the Profane
Week 7 Intimate Lives
Week 8 Reformation
Week 9 The Social World
Week 10 Leviathan
Week 11 The Scientific Revolution
Week 12 Enlightenment
Week 13 Reading Week

A detailed, weekly schedule of lectures, tutorial topics and readings will be available to enrolled students via iLearn.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Read, evaluate, and ask questions of a variety of primary source documents.
  • Synthesize their understanding and analysis into clear, specific, evidence-based, historical arguments presented in grammatically correct writing with appropriate references.

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly Quiz
  • Document Analysis
  • Short Paper
  • Final Synoptic Essay

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Synthesize their understanding and analysis into clear, specific, evidence-based, historical arguments presented in grammatically correct writing with appropriate references.

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly Quiz
  • Document Analysis
  • Short Paper
  • Final Synoptic Essay

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment tasks

  • Short Paper
  • Final Synoptic Essay

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand and explain the extent to which European life altered between the Middle Ages and the French Revolution.
  • Read, evaluate, and ask questions of a variety of primary source documents.

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly Quiz
  • Document Analysis
  • Short Paper
  • Final Synoptic Essay

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyze and assess the impact that various events, movements, and ideas had on European societies and cultures during the early modern period.
  • Synthesize their understanding and analysis into clear, specific, evidence-based, historical arguments presented in grammatically correct writing with appropriate references.

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly Quiz
  • Document Analysis
  • Short Paper
  • Final Synoptic Essay

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Synthesize their understanding and analysis into clear, specific, evidence-based, historical arguments presented in grammatically correct writing with appropriate references.

Assessment tasks

  • Short Paper
  • Final Synoptic Essay

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Analyze and assess the impact that various events, movements, and ideas had on European societies and cultures during the early modern period.

Assessment tasks

  • Document Analysis
  • Short Paper
  • Final Synoptic Essay

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand and explain the extent to which European life altered between the Middle Ages and the French Revolution.
  • Analyze and assess the impact that various events, movements, and ideas had on European societies and cultures during the early modern period.
  • Read, evaluate, and ask questions of a variety of primary source documents.

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly Quiz
  • Document Analysis

Assessment Policies

Assignment Submission

Written work must be submitted online via Turnitin. For instructions and information see the iLearn Student Guide to Turnitin http://www.mq.edu.au/iLearn/student_info/assignments.htm

Return of Marked Work

All written work will be returned online. Weekly quizzes will be returned in tutorial classes.

Extensions

Students who encounter difficulties in meeting the deadlines for written assessment tasks should apply for an extension via ask.mq.edu in advance of the due date. Students should familiarize themselves with the University's Disruption to Studies policy before submitting such a request.

Late Submissions

Work submitted late without an extension will be penalized -2.5% per day. Any student who wishes to submit the assignment late without an extension must submit it direct to Dr. Baker and must be prepared to explain (in person) why the assignment is late. Assignments submitted more than two weeks after the due date will only be graded on a Pass/Fail basis. The last date that any late assessment task will be accepted for grading is Friday 9 June 2017.

Turnitin will not accept late submissions for this unit - you must contact Dr. Baker directly in order to submit any assessment task after the due date.

Disruption to Studies

Students should familiarize themselves with the University's Disruption to Studies policy before submitting such a request. 

Students can submit Disruption to Studies requests online via ask.mq.edu.