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ICOM100 – Introduction to International Communication

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Dr. Li Ji
Contact via li.ji@mq.edu.au
3-4pm Tuesdays
Lara Palombo
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
"We cannot not communicate." (Watzlawick, 1973). This unit introduces a theoretical framework for the study of international communication. It provides students with a toolbox that can be used to critically approach and analyse communication processes and the creation of meaning. The aim of this unit, and of international communication in general, is to create an awareness of the self and the other and to facilitate, analyse and improve communication processes between these entities. Tutorials focus on practical tasks and consist of the application of theory and methodology, the examination of the institutional settings of international communication through case studies, and on issues around advertising, public relations, new media, global media and development communication. Students will practise semiotic analysis, content analysis, case study, and close reading.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Recognise and define different areas of International Communication theory
  2. Explain the key theories in various different fields and apply them to International Communication
  3. Identify and apply key theories to set texts
  4. Construct a position using research methodologies from which to answer a question relevant to International Communication
  5. Demonstrate the importance and relevance of academic literacy skills for International Communicaiton

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
1. Online Quizzes 30% Week 3 and Week 11
2. Semiotic Analysis 30% 4 April (week 6), 5pm
3. Research Proposal 30% 30 May (Week 12), 5pm
4. Participation 10% ongoing

1. Online Quizzes

Due: Week 3 and Week 11
Weighting: 30%

This assessment task is designed to assess your basic academic writing skills, to assess your understanding of the key theories and concepts that you have learnt across this unit. There will be two sets of online quizzes respectively due by Week 3 and Week 11. 

The first online quiz expects you to identify direct quotes, paraphrased ideas and correct referencing styles. There will be 10 multiple-choice questions (single answer), and these questions are based on one reading in Week 2. The quiz questions will be put on iLearn in Week 2. It will take you approximately 30 minutes to complete. Since you need to find different sentences in the reading, it suggests that you review the reading before start the quiz.The quiz is worth 10%. The due date is 5pm 14 March Week 3. 

Paraphrasing, quoting and referencing will be introduced and practiced in tutorials in Week 1 and Week 2.  

The second online quiz consists of 20 multiple choice questions (single answers). These questions focus on a broad overview of this course, and are mainly based on unit readings and lecture ppt slides. You need to use the course outline as a framework for study. The questions will be put on iLearn in Week 10. It should take you approximately 30 minutes to complete. The quiz is worth 20%. The due date is 5pm 23 May Week 11. 

Key concepts and theories will be emphasised in lectures that may be covered in the online quiz. Regular revision of lecture ppt slides and notes are recommended. 

Please note that these two online quizzes can be completed at any time anywhere before the due dates. A strict time limit will be set. You are only allowed to attempt the quizzes ONCE.  Please ensure that you have a smooth Internet connection. If there are any difficulties in access to Internet, or any problems with your Internet connection that disrupt the completion of the tests, please email the unit convenor immediately. Arrangements will be made for you to complete the quizzes. Please note that different questions will be selected randomly from the question pool. 

Assessment criteria are: 

  • Correctness of the answers to multiple choice questions
  • Only one correct answer to each question
  • One point per correct answer

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Recognise and define different areas of International Communication theory
  • Explain the key theories in various different fields and apply them to International Communication
  • Demonstrate the importance and relevance of academic literacy skills for International Communicaiton

2. Semiotic Analysis

Due: 4 April (week 6), 5pm
Weighting: 30%

You will be given advertisements on iLearn to choose from for your written analysis. In your short essay (around 1000 words), you should use the semiotic terms (eg. icon, index, symbol) that have been introduced in class to explain how the ad is constructed, how meaning is created, and if the ad is effective or not. Your analysis should be precise, concise, and use semiotic theory. Using relevant references and providing a reference list are compulsory. Written analysis needs to be submitted by 5pm 4 April (Week 6). Please check instructions and rubric for this assessment on iLearn.

Assessment criteria are: 

  • Correct application of semiotic terms to the interpretation of advertisements
  • Critical reflection on how semiotic theory ties into the way the advertisement is produced and the message is received
  • Writing skills and grammatical skills
  • Consistent referencing and good choice of sources, with good reference to semioticians

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain the key theories in various different fields and apply them to International Communication
  • Identify and apply key theories to set texts
  • Construct a position using research methodologies from which to answer a question relevant to International Communication
  • Demonstrate the importance and relevance of academic literacy skills for International Communicaiton

3. Research Proposal

Due: 30 May (Week 12), 5pm
Weighting: 30%

This assessment task is designed to test your ability to synthesise information and to organise your thoughts to design and address research questions, and to apply pertinent theories and methods to organise your own research projects.

This task requires you to develop a brief proposal for a research project of 1000 words. You can choose one of the topics that you have learnt about in this unit for your project. You need to design a research question or hypothesis that you intend to address, present a brief review of the literature you plan to contribute to in conducting your research, discuss the theories and methodology (research methods) to be adopted for the research, and explain the significance of the proposed project. 

An example of a research proposal will be put up on iLearn. Please also find instructions and rubrics on iLearn.

Assessment criteria for this task include: 

  • Significance, originality and relevance of topic
  • Original and relevant research questions or hypotheses 
  • Well argued and logical literature review that provides a good overview of the background and context for the research project  
  • Articulated theoretical framework for the research
  • Appropriate methodology clearly articulated and justified for the research project
  • Clear and concise writing, well-organised structure, consistent referencing including in-text citations

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Recognise and define different areas of International Communication theory
  • Explain the key theories in various different fields and apply them to International Communication
  • Identify and apply key theories to set texts
  • Construct a position using research methodologies from which to answer a question relevant to International Communication
  • Demonstrate the importance and relevance of academic literacy skills for International Communicaiton

4. Participation

Due: ongoing
Weighting: 10%

Participation

  • Please remember that in standards-based assessment, it is through assessment tasks that students demonstrate the unit Learning Outcomes. In this unit, participation will be assessed using a rubric. 

Attendance

  • Students are required to sign the name sheet in each tutorial.
  • But please remember that turning up is not a learning outcome. 

Assessment Criteria are: 

1. Demonstrates good preparation for the assigned topics

2. Initiates critical discussions about assigned topics and provides comments that advance the level and depth of dialogue (consistent)

3. Demonstrates an active role in discussions

4. Contributes to ongoing discussions

5. Demonstrates group research collaboration and research skills


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Recognise and define different areas of International Communication theory
  • Explain the key theories in various different fields and apply them to International Communication
  • Construct a position using research methodologies from which to answer a question relevant to International Communication
  • Demonstrate the importance and relevance of academic literacy skills for International Communicaiton

Delivery and Resources

ICOM100/S1/Day/Lecture_1/01 Tuesday 9:00am 10:00am 1:00 W5A T1 Theatre
ICOM100/S1/Day/Lecture_1/02 ilecture Tuesday 9:00am 10:00am 1:00 #iLecture Registration Option
ICOM100/S1/Day/Tutorial_1/01 Tuesday 10:00am 11:00am 1:00 X5B 039 Tutorial Rm
ICOM100/S1/Day/Tutorial_1/02 Tuesday 11:00am 12:00pm 1:00

X5B 039 Tutorial Rm

ICOM100/S1/Day/Tutorial_1/03 Tuesday 12:00pm 1:00pm 1:00

X5B 039 Tutorial Rm

ICOM100/S1/Day/Tutorial_1/04 Tuesday 2:00pm 3:00pm 1:00

C5A 313 Tutorial Rm

         

 

 

TECHNOLOGY USED AND REQUIRED

Online units can be assesed at iLearn: http://ilearn.mq.edu.au

iLearn is the main platform for material sharing, communication and assignment submission.

PC and Internet access are required. Basic computer skills (e.g., Internet browsing) and skills in word processing are also a requirement. Please consult teaching staff for any further, more specific requirements.

REQUIRED AND RECOMMENDED TEXTS AND/OR MATERIALS

Please refer to iLearn for both required and recommended readings. 

Unit readings are available on e-Reserve on Macquarie University library website. There is no hard copy of unit readers available for this unit. 

More reading materials will be uploaded on iLearn.

Unit Schedule

Week 1 

Introduction

In this lecture we will look at the course outline and make final adjustments according to students' input.

Tutorial: Introduce yourselves in the tutorial, go through unit materials, and address any concerns about assessment tasks. 

Week 2

International communication: paradigms and perspectives

In this session we will concentrate on basic international communication and communication theories to get an overview of the filed of international communication. 

Tutorial: Paraphrasing workshop – how to summarise a message and integrate it into your own text. 

Week 3

Cultures of global communication 

We will examine the cultural dimension of international communication 

Tutorial: Discussion about diasporic phenomena and intercultural communication 

Week 4

The creation of meaning

We continue examining communication processes and focus on the creation of meaning.

Tutorial: Semiotic interpretation of a poster

Week 5

International advertising campaigns and public relations

Tutorial: Case study: United Colors of Benetton

Week 6

International advertising: a case study

This week we will explore the state/marketing interface by analysing international advertising about AIDS.

Tutorial: Global communication about AIDS

Week 7

Global media flows

This week is dedicated to international media flows and contra-flows of visual media.

Tutorial: Case study: Heterogeneous global audiences. We will look at communication as mainstream commercial commodity vs alternative, anti-globalisation communication strategies.

Week 8

Global media and public sphere

This session will introduce Habermas' concept of public sphere and lead to a discussion about space for public sphere within the new media

Tutorial: Research proposal writing workshop - the workshop will address how to develop research questions/hypotheses, how to review literature, how to develop a theoretical framework, and how to select proper research methods. You may complete the research proposal assignment from today onwards.

Week 9

International communication and power

This session will introduce the concept of power, and the role of power especially soft power and public diplomacy in international communication. 

Tutorial: Case study: The Evaluation of public diplomacy practice in selected countries.

Week 10

International communication in the Internet age

This session is dedicated to review international communication issues in the Internet age. We will examine how diplomacy, power and public sphere are affected by social media through a case study - Arab Spring 2011. 

Tutorial: Research projects showcase - discuss an example of a research proposal and showcase your proposed research projects. 

Week11 

International communication and language

Different languages can be one of the biggest obstacles in international communication. We will look at the role of English as lingua franca and explore how useful the ability to speak a foreign language is in international environments such as business, education, and politics.

Tutorial: The circles of language (group exercise)

Week 12

International Negotiation

This lecture is about the purposes of effective international communication

Tutorial: Case study on international business negotiation

Week 13

Unit Review

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Additional information

MMCCS website https://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/faculties_and_departments/faculty_of_arts/department_of_media_music_communication_and_cultural_studies/

MMCCS Session Re-mark Application http://www.mq.edu.au/pubstatic/public/download/?id=167914

Information is correct at the time of publication

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Recognise and define different areas of International Communication theory
  • Explain the key theories in various different fields and apply them to International Communication
  • Identify and apply key theories to set texts
  • Construct a position using research methodologies from which to answer a question relevant to International Communication
  • Demonstrate the importance and relevance of academic literacy skills for International Communicaiton

Assessment tasks

  • 1. Online Quizzes
  • 2. Semiotic Analysis
  • 3. Research Proposal
  • 4. Participation

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Recognise and define different areas of International Communication theory
  • Explain the key theories in various different fields and apply them to International Communication
  • Identify and apply key theories to set texts
  • Construct a position using research methodologies from which to answer a question relevant to International Communication
  • Demonstrate the importance and relevance of academic literacy skills for International Communicaiton

Assessment tasks

  • 2. Semiotic Analysis
  • 3. Research Proposal
  • 4. Participation

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Recognise and define different areas of International Communication theory
  • Explain the key theories in various different fields and apply them to International Communication
  • Identify and apply key theories to set texts
  • Construct a position using research methodologies from which to answer a question relevant to International Communication

Assessment tasks

  • 1. Online Quizzes
  • 2. Semiotic Analysis
  • 3. Research Proposal
  • 4. Participation

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Explain the key theories in various different fields and apply them to International Communication
  • Identify and apply key theories to set texts
  • Construct a position using research methodologies from which to answer a question relevant to International Communication

Assessment tasks

  • 2. Semiotic Analysis
  • 3. Research Proposal
  • 4. Participation

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Explain the key theories in various different fields and apply them to International Communication
  • Demonstrate the importance and relevance of academic literacy skills for International Communicaiton

Assessment task

  • 4. Participation

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Explain the key theories in various different fields and apply them to International Communication
  • Construct a position using research methodologies from which to answer a question relevant to International Communication

Assessment tasks

  • 3. Research Proposal
  • 4. Participation

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Construct a position using research methodologies from which to answer a question relevant to International Communication

Assessment task

  • 4. Participation

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Recognise and define different areas of International Communication theory
  • Explain the key theories in various different fields and apply them to International Communication
  • Identify and apply key theories to set texts
  • Construct a position using research methodologies from which to answer a question relevant to International Communication

Assessment tasks

  • 1. Online Quizzes
  • 2. Semiotic Analysis
  • 3. Research Proposal
  • 4. Participation

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Recognise and define different areas of International Communication theory
  • Explain the key theories in various different fields and apply them to International Communication
  • Identify and apply key theories to set texts
  • Construct a position using research methodologies from which to answer a question relevant to International Communication
  • Demonstrate the importance and relevance of academic literacy skills for International Communicaiton

Assessment tasks

  • 1. Online Quizzes
  • 2. Semiotic Analysis
  • 3. Research Proposal
  • 4. Participation

Assignment Submission

The paper-based in-class test should be submitted before the lecture is finished. 

All other assignments should be submitted to Turnitin on iLearn. No Hard Copy submissions. 

Information about how to submit work online can be accessed through the iLearn unit.

Return of marked work

During semester, marked work will be returned to students via Turnitin on iLearn.

Late Penalties 

Any assessment task that is handed in late, that is after the due date, will incur a late penalty of 10% per day (including weekends), unless the student has applied for 'Disruption to Studies' for the assessment tasks. 

Requirements to Complete the Unit Satisfactory

  • Timely submission of assessment tasks

Assessment tasks are aligned to the unit Learning Outcomes. Timely submission of assessment tasks is a unit requirement or penalties apply. 10% per day (including weekends) will be deducted for all late submissions unless Disruption to Studies (including a request for an extension) is approved.

  • Participation in tutorials

You are required to attend all tutorials. As participation in the process of Learning is linked to and underpins the unit Leaning Outcomes, you will need to either apply for Disruption to Studies to cover any missed tutorial (if the disruption is greater than three consecutive days) or supply appropriate documentation to your unit convenor for any missed tutorial (if less than three consecutive days).