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ECH 130 – Health and Wellbeing

2017 – S1 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor and Lecturer
Melissa Johnstone
Contact via 0298509807
265, X5B
By Appointment
Tutor
Raewyn Burden
Tutor
Sanobia Palkhiwala
Tutor
Emma Sutherland
Lecturer
Helen Little
Helen Little
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit examines health, wellbeing, nutrition and safety of children from infancy to 12 years. Implications for children, families and communities are addressed, including practices in a range of settings. Issues and debates arising from research, available technology, community attitudes and values are critically examined. This unit introduces students to the syllabus content associated with the personal development, health and physical education (PDHPE) key learning area with particular focus on the safe living, personal health choices, and growth and development strands. Skills and knowledge in planning, teaching and assessing PDHPE programs are examined, including modifications to the curriculum to meet the needs of diverse learners.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Understand different approaches to health from international policy to individual choice.
  2. Know how to access and use key early childhood, school and government documents relating to health.
  3. Know how to access key research findings relating to infant and child health.
  4. Understand their own knowledge and biases regarding health issues.
  5. Appreciate the multifactorial nature of health problems and differential impacts of health issues on various groups within society.
  6. Have an understanding of the diverse range of health issues in Australia.
  7. Acquire basic skills in teaching young children about health and developing safe but challenging learning environments.
  8. Understand basic strategies to prevent or intervene.
  9. Appreciate the multidisciplinary nature of health problems.

General Assessment Information

In order to successfully complete the assessment you must:

  • Consult the Assessment Guide published through the unit's iLearn site.
  • Have access to the textbook and read at least the required chapters. 
  • Listen to all lecture recordings.
  • Use the Assessment Guide to ensure correct preparation and completion of assessments.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
EYLF & PDHPE 10% Open 4 April, 2pm-11.59pm
Major Essay 45% 2 May, 11.59pm
Overview of Unit 42% Exam period
Research Participation 3% Week 13

EYLF & PDHPE

Due: Open 4 April, 2pm-11.59pm
Weighting: 10%

Teachers use a range of documents to support the health and well being of infants and children.  Key documents are the Early Years Learning Framework (for Birth to 5 years) and the Personal Development, Health and Physical Education (Kindergarten to Year 6) Syllabus.  The purpose of this quiz is to support your understanding of these key documents.

There will be 10 questions, worth 1 mark each. 

This online quiz will be open for 10 hours, Tuesday 4 April, from 2pm - 11.59pm.  You will have one hour to complete and only one attempt is permitted.

Required readings

http://docs.education.gov.au/node/2632

'http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/pdhpe/

Online quizzes are an individual assessment task and MUST BE COMPLETED by each student individually

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Know how to access and use key early childhood, school and government documents relating to health.
  • Acquire basic skills in teaching young children about health and developing safe but challenging learning environments.
  • Understand basic strategies to prevent or intervene.

Major Essay

Due: 2 May, 11.59pm
Weighting: 45%

According to Vanderloo (2014) "Screen-viewing among children remains a global health concern."  Do you agree with this statement? The purpose of this essay is to discuss current evidence regarding Vanderloo's claim. 

Although your key article has a focus on preschool aged children, you may include evidence from any age group, birth to 12 years. As the literature surrounding screen time and health and well-being is broad, you may like to focus your essay on one of these suggestions: 

  • Screen time and physical activity/sedentary behaviour
  • Screen time and aggression
  • Screen time and attention
  • Screen time and literacy/numeracy
  • Screen time and the impacts of advertising (e.g., sexualisation of children)

Please note that these are suggestions, and you are not restricted to focus on one of these. 

Your key reference (Vanderloo, 2014) is available from http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2431/14/205  It is in an open access journal, so you will not need to go through the University Library and will not pay to access the article.

The marking criteria will be available on iLearn.  For students wanting to start before full details are released, keep in mind that your evidence will need to come primarily from recent articles (e.g. since 2005) published in peer reviewed journals. 

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand different approaches to health from international policy to individual choice.
  • Know how to access key research findings relating to infant and child health.
  • Understand their own knowledge and biases regarding health issues.
  • Appreciate the multifactorial nature of health problems and differential impacts of health issues on various groups within society.

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand different approaches to health from international policy to individual choice.
  • Know how to access key research findings relating to infant and child health.
  • Understand their own knowledge and biases regarding health issues.
  • Appreciate the multifactorial nature of health problems and differential impacts of health issues on various groups within society.
  • Appreciate the multidisciplinary nature of health problems.

Overview of Unit

Due: Exam period
Weighting: 42%

The exam will cover content from lectures and your textbook.

Additional details will be published in the Assessment Guide available on iLearn.

Students are required to be available throughout the duration of the exam period http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/examination/procedure.html  If you are unavailable on the day of the exam and it's not due to unavoidable circumstances such as hospitalisation, then you will be marked as absent from the exam and you will fail the unit.  The exam cannot be completed before the date listed in the University exam timetable.

Students who live outside of the Sydney Metropolitan Area who are registered for a regional exam centre will be able to complete the exam at their exam centre.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand different approaches to health from international policy to individual choice.
  • Know how to access and use key early childhood, school and government documents relating to health.
  • Know how to access key research findings relating to infant and child health.
  • Understand their own knowledge and biases regarding health issues.
  • Appreciate the multifactorial nature of health problems and differential impacts of health issues on various groups within society.
  • Have an understanding of the diverse range of health issues in Australia.
  • Acquire basic skills in teaching young children about health and developing safe but challenging learning environments.
  • Understand basic strategies to prevent or intervene.
  • Appreciate the multidisciplinary nature of health problems.

Research Participation

Due: Week 13
Weighting: 3%

Throughout the semester, you will see information about research you can participate in (e.g. completing online surveys). You can accumulate up to 3 marks based on your participation in research. If you do not want to participate in research, you can submit a 800 word essay instead.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Know how to access key research findings relating to infant and child health.
  • Appreciate the multidisciplinary nature of health problems.

Delivery and Resources

Delivery

ECH130 has a total of three (3) contact hours per week, including 2 x 1hr lectures and 1 x 1hr tutorial.

The textbook for ECH130 is:

Garvis, S. & Pendergast, D. (2014). Health and wellbeing in childhood. Melbourne: Cambridge University Press.

For those wanting to make a head start, the following chapters will be required reading: Chapters 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 17, 20, 23, and 24 + pp 191-195, 226, 231.

You must have access to this textbook throughout the unit.  Please purchase the textbook as soon as possible.  The Marketing Excerpt PDF at http://www.cambridge.org/at/academic/subjects/education/education-history-theory/health-and-wellbeing-childhood#contentsTabAnchor provides part of Chapter 1 and may be useful if you want to look at the textbook in advance. 

 

External Students

Attendance at the on-campus is voluntary.  You must register for the on-campus no later than 17 March if you wish to attend.  Details will be available on iLearn from the first week of session 1.

 

Unit Expectations

  • In order to be eligible for a passing grade, students must meet the following attendance requirements:
    • Internal Students: Attend at least 80% of all tutorials – punctuality is expected. Consistent lateness or absence will jeopardise a passing grade
    • Students are required to contribute to all online and tutorials tasks
  • Students are expected to read weekly readings before completing tasks and attending tutorials
  • Students are expected to listen/attend weekly lectures before completing tasks and attending tutorials
  • All assessment tasks must be submitted

 

Assessment

When preparing your assignments, it is essential that:

  • Students must retain a copy of all assignments before submission, and retain the copy until your final grade for the subject has been received;
  • Marks will be deducted if you submit your assessment late (refer to the ‘assignment extensions and late penalties’ section below for more details);
  • If an assessment is considered to be below passing standard, another staff member on the unit will provide a second opinion. No failed assessment may be re-submitted.

Final Submissions

  • Students are responsible for checking that their submission has been successful and has been submitted by the due date and time.
  • Late submissions due to last minute technical difficulties will incur a lateness penalty.

 

Assignment extensions and late penalties

Applications for extensions must be made via AskMQ at https://ask.mq.edu.au as a "Disruption to Studies" request before the submission date. Students who experience a disruption to their studies through ill-health or misadventure are able to apply for this request. Extensions can only be granted if they meet the Disruption to Studies policy and are submitted via ask.mq.edu.au. This will ensure consistency in the consideration of such requests is maintained.

In general, there should be no need for extensions except through illness or misadventure that would be categorised as unavoidable disruption according to the University definition of same, and currently available at: http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/exams/disruption_to_studies/

Late submissions without extension will receive a penalty of 5% reduction of the total possible mark for each day late (including weekends and public holidays). You are reminded that submitting even just 1 day late could be the difference between passing and failing a unit. Late penalties are applied by unit convenors or their delegates after tasks are assessed.

No assessable work will be accepted after the return/release of marked work on the same topic. If a student is still permitted to submit on the basis of unavoidable disruption, an alternative topic may be set.

Students should keep an electronic file of all assessments. Claims regarding "lost" assessments cannot be made if the file cannot be produced. It is also advisable to keep an electronic file of all drafts and the final submission on a USB untouched/unopened after submission. This can be used to demonstrate easily that the assessment has not been amended after the submission date.

 

Department of Educational Studies (EC) Academic Honesty Guidelines:  

All assignments should cite and provide full bibliographical details of all material that you have used to inform or support your ideas. At the Department of Educational Studies, students are required to use the American Psychological Association (APA) referencing procedures. Full details about how to cite and reference correctly can be found in Perrin (2015) and in the Academic Honesty Handbook

Perrin, R. (2015). Pocket guide to APA style (5th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.

 

Final Grades

The final grade a student receives signifies their overall performance in meeting the learning outcomes for the unit. The number assigned to a grade (Standard Numerical Grade or SNG) reflects the extent to which student attainment matches the grade descriptors.

Your raw mark for the unit (i.e., the total of your marks for each assessment item) may not be the same as the SNG which you receive. Results may be scaled to ensure there is a degree of comparability across the university, so that units with the same past performances of their students should achieve similar results. The process of scaling does not change the order of marks among students. A student who receives a higher raw score mark than another will also receive a higher final scaled mark.

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand their own knowledge and biases regarding health issues.
  • Appreciate the multifactorial nature of health problems and differential impacts of health issues on various groups within society.

Assessment task

  • Research Participation

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment task

  • Major Essay

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Know how to access key research findings relating to infant and child health.

Assessment task

  • Research Participation

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand different approaches to health from international policy to individual choice.
  • Know how to access and use key early childhood, school and government documents relating to health.
  • Know how to access key research findings relating to infant and child health.
  • Understand their own knowledge and biases regarding health issues.
  • Appreciate the multifactorial nature of health problems and differential impacts of health issues on various groups within society.
  • Have an understanding of the diverse range of health issues in Australia.
  • Acquire basic skills in teaching young children about health and developing safe but challenging learning environments.
  • Understand basic strategies to prevent or intervene.
  • Appreciate the multidisciplinary nature of health problems.

Assessment tasks

  • EYLF & PDHPE
  • Overview of Unit

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand their own knowledge and biases regarding health issues.
  • Appreciate the multifactorial nature of health problems and differential impacts of health issues on various groups within society.
  • Appreciate the multidisciplinary nature of health problems.

Assessment tasks

  • EYLF & PDHPE
  • Major Essay
  • Overview of Unit

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand different approaches to health from international policy to individual choice.
  • Have an understanding of the diverse range of health issues in Australia.

Assessment task

  • Overview of Unit

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Have an understanding of the diverse range of health issues in Australia.

Assessment task

  • Overview of Unit

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment task

  • EYLF & PDHPE