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MAS 105 – Media Cultures

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Convenor, lecturer, and tutor
Dr Rachael Gunn
Contact via Email
Y3A.153
By appointment
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit assesses some of the major transformations and continuities in the media environment of the early twenty-first century. Topics covered include: technological convergence; global media flows; regulation and ownership of media industries; the challenges to publicly funded media in an increasingly global and digital media environment; new and emerging media industries, including the creative industries discourse; key discourses and frameworks for analysing media audiences.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. analyse and critically evaluate key concepts in Media Studies
  2. identify the ways new media technologies shape and are shaped by social, cultural, political and economic processes
  3. distinguish between and evaluate various theoretical positions on media audiences, media industries, regulation and policy
  4. undertake independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals
  5. communicate ideas using appropriate academic discourses, both verbally and in a range of genres of writing, including abstracts and essays
  6. reflect critically on their own academic work and use that reflection to plan for future assessments
  7. engage actively in the process of learning

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Essay Outline 25% Thursday 14 September 11:59pm
Online Weekly Quizzes 25% Weeks 2-5, 7-12
Final Essay 40% Tuesday 7 November 11:59pm
Active Contribution 10% ongoing

Essay Outline

Due: Thursday 14 September 11:59pm
Weighting: 25%

You will submit an Outline of your Final Essay (700 words +/-10% and excluding references). The Outline should consist of a bullet point description of how you expect to structure your essay, including your argument and key points you will develop to support your argument. In general, the order of points in the Outline should reflect the order in which you will present your argument in the Final Essay.  The Outline should demonstrate the ability to construct a framework for analysing and critiquing an identified issue. It should be clear and specific, and concisely communicate your discussion. The Outline should also acknowledge some of your (initial) research choices. You should also include a reference list of at least four academic sources you have read so far in preparing your Outline and should include in-text referencing where appropriate. At least one of your sources should be from independent research. The essay questions and further instructions will be made available on iLearn. The Outline is to be submitted via the Turnitin link on the MAS105 iLearn page by the due date and time.

Marking Criteria

  • Adequate reading and research
  • Understanding of key concepts in the unit
  • Ability to compare and analyse key concepts in the unit
  • Organisation of argument
  • Clarity of communication
  • Accurate and appropriate referencing

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • analyse and critically evaluate key concepts in Media Studies
  • identify the ways new media technologies shape and are shaped by social, cultural, political and economic processes
  • distinguish between and evaluate various theoretical positions on media audiences, media industries, regulation and policy
  • undertake independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals
  • communicate ideas using appropriate academic discourses, both verbally and in a range of genres of writing, including abstracts and essays

Online Weekly Quizzes

Due: Weeks 2-5, 7-12
Weighting: 25%

There are ten online multiple choice quizzes throughout the semester testing your understanding of lectures and set readings, and thus your participation in two key elements of the unit. The quizzes are open book, but in order to successfully complete them you must have attended or carefully listened to the weekly lecture and read the set weekly readings.

The weekly quizzes are hosted on MAS105's iLearn site. They will open immediately after the lecture on Monday (at 3pm), and will close just before the lecture on the following Monday (at 2pm) - you have one week to complete each quiz. There will be quizzes in Weeks 2-5 and 7-12. There is no quiz in Week 6 because it is a Research and Writing week. Feedback on your quiz answers will be available one week after the quiz closes.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • analyse and critically evaluate key concepts in Media Studies
  • identify the ways new media technologies shape and are shaped by social, cultural, political and economic processes
  • distinguish between and evaluate various theoretical positions on media audiences, media industries, regulation and policy
  • engage actively in the process of learning

Final Essay

Due: Tuesday 7 November 11:59pm
Weighting: 40%

The Final Essay (1700 words +/-10% and excluding references) provides an opportunity for you to build on the Outline you submitted in Week 7. The essay questions will be made available on iLearn. Unless otherwise advised by your tutor, you should address the same essay question as you did for the Outline, but you may want to modify your approach or arguments in the light of feedback from your tutor and your own reflection on the strengths and weaknesses of your argument.

All essays should include evidence of wide reading and significant independent research. Your essay should refer to AT LEAST:

  • three set readings from MAS105, including those mentioned in your specific essay question
  • five academic sources through independent research - at least two of these should be articles from an academic peer-reviewed journal

Broader reading within the disciplines of media, communications and cultural studies will be highly valued. All essays should include a reference list with full bubliographic details of all sources referred to in the essay, and in-text referencing. In MAS105, we expect you to use the Harvard or author-date referencing style. Further information about how to use this style is included on the library website under 'Harvard Style'. The Final Essay is to be submitted via the Turnitin link on the MAS105 iLearn page by the due date and time.

Marking Criteria

  • Understanding and critical engagement with key readings in the unit
  • Comparison and analysis of key concepts in the unit
  • Independent research within the discipline
  • Use of research and reading to support a critical argument
  • Organisation of argument including clearly addressing the question
  • Clarity of communication
  • Accurate and appropriate referencing
  • Ability to reflect upon and utilise essay outline feedback  

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • analyse and critically evaluate key concepts in Media Studies
  • identify the ways new media technologies shape and are shaped by social, cultural, political and economic processes
  • distinguish between and evaluate various theoretical positions on media audiences, media industries, regulation and policy
  • undertake independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals
  • communicate ideas using appropriate academic discourses, both verbally and in a range of genres of writing, including abstracts and essays
  • reflect critically on their own academic work and use that reflection to plan for future assessments

Active Contribution

Due: ongoing
Weighting: 10%

Attendance and contribution in tutorials, based on effective preparation including reading, and attending lectures (or listening to them carefully online) is essential to successfully meet the learning outcomes. Tutors will keep records of your attendance at tutorials and will evaluate your active participation, preparedness, and contributions to class discussions and group activities.

Marking criteria

  • evidence of preparation for tutorials by reading and attending (or auditing) lectures
  • informed contributions to discussion in tutorials
  • thoughtful attempts to share and develop ideas with peers and tutor
  • evidence of reflection on your own understandings and perspectives
  • regular attendance at tutorials

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • distinguish between and evaluate various theoretical positions on media audiences, media industries, regulation and policy
  • communicate ideas using appropriate academic discourses, both verbally and in a range of genres of writing, including abstracts and essays
  • reflect critically on their own academic work and use that reflection to plan for future assessments
  • engage actively in the process of learning

Delivery and Resources

Delivery Mode

Day (Internal).

Unit Requirements

A 3-credit point unit equates to an average of 10 hours of work per week over the 15 weeks of session (150 hours). Therefore, it is expected that you will spend 10 hours per week on MAS105, which includes lectures, tutorials, and private study. Private study may include reading time and preparation for assignments.

Students are reminded that they will be assessed on their knowledge of the unit content, which includes the lectures, set readings, as well as in-class discussions.

Required Readings

You will be required to read two articles each week - a full list of topics are in the Unit Schedule section below. All required readings will be listed on iLearn, and can be accessed through the library's MultiSearch function. Students must read the required readings for each week before the lecture, and certainly before the tutorial. These readings must be easily accessible in class, so required readings should either be printed out or downloaded and saved to your device.

​Recommended Text

Meikle, Graham & Young, Sherman (2012) Media Convergence: Networked Digital Media in Everyday Life, Palgrave is recommended and available in the Coop Bookshop.  Two chapters from the book are required readings for the unit.

Technology Used and Required

The assignments in this unit require word-processing skills and access to a web browser. Students will be expected to submit written material in class and online, and should therefore be equipped with appropriate technology and writing materials to do so.

MAS105 uses iLearn and it is expected that students will regularly check iLearn for details about lectures, assessments and further readings. The iLearn site will also give you an opportunity to discuss administrative and intellectual issues with your peers. You may bring tablets and laptops to class if you wish but you will be expected to have completed core readings BEFORE tutorials. These readings must be easily accessible in class, so required readings should either be printed out or downloaded and saved to your device. It is not essential that you bring a device to tutorials. Some computers are available for use in the Library.

Lectures and Tutorials

This unit comprises of a one-hour lecture every week throughout the semester, followed by a one-hour tutorial. Lectures and Tutorials begin in week one. Students are expected to attend every lecture. Lectures will be on Mondays 2-3pm in the Lotus Theatre, and are also recorded on ECHO360 which can be accessed via iLearn. Students are expected to attend every tutorial. Not attending tutorials, not preparing for tutorials, and not productively contributing to class discussions will negatively impact upon your 'Active Contribution' mark for the unit. You should read the required readings for each week before the lecture, and certainly before the tutorial. See the timetable website for further details: https://timetables.mq.edu.au/2017/.

Please note that we are unable to assist with changes of tutorial time. If you want to change to a different tutorial time you will need to go to the e-student website and try to change through that system. All changes to tutorial enrolment need to be made in this way by the student concerned - you will not just able able to turn up at the tutorial you want and hope the tutor lets you stay, as this is likely to cause unacceptable overcrowding.

Assignment submission

Written assignments will be submitted to turnitin via the links on the MAS105 iLearn website. Please make sure your full name, student number and tutor's name appears on the first page of your document. See below for information regarding late penalties and extensions.

Contacting your Tutor

Please record your tutor's email address at the beginning of semester and questions about MAS105 should first be directed to your tutor. Students should ensure that they can receive emails sent to their MQ email addresses. Tutors may take up to 48 hours to respond to students due to other teaching and research commitments.

Extensions and Late Penalties

Assignments which are submitted late without a previously negotiated extension will incur a 5% late penalty per day (including weekends and public holidays).

Extensions on the final version may be granted if Disruption to Studies is approved, or may be approved at the convenor's discretion upon receipt of appropriate documentation in cases where Disruption to Studies may not be applicable. Please see the Disruption to Studies policy: http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html.

Please contact the convenor Dr Rachael Gunn via email BEFORE the due date if you have health issues and/or serious family difficulties that mean you are unable to submit one of the assessed items by the due date. You may be given a short extension.

If you are unable to attend a tutorial due to a brief illness such as a cold or flu, please contact your tutor by email to explain the circumstances. Your tutor will record the reason for your absence.

Students with prolonged adverse circumstances or a pre-existing disability/health condition may be eligible for ongoing assistance and support. Such support is governed by other policies and may be sought and coordinated through Campus Wellbeing and Support Services.

What you can expect in MAS105

Our strategy in MAS105 is to get you to deepen and broaden your interest in media studies by exposing you to some critical theoretical frameworks that will help you understand the contemporary media landscape. 

A lot of nonsense is written and talked around the media, and media studies can help you excavate the assumptions people (scholars and civilians) make when they pronounce on the media.  You will have an opportunity to critically interrogate those assumptions, compare different perspectives on related issues, and test the evidence that is offered to support some of the big statements people make about ‘the media’ and especially ‘new media’.  In short we’ll expect you to come out at the end of the unit able to be critical of others’ (and your own) preconceptions about new media. 

We will ask a lot of you in this unit – you won’t be able to slowly fall asleep in lectures and tutorials and then regurgitate hastily memorised material in a final exam.  To pass the unit you will need to consistently attend and participate in lectures and tutorials, read every week, and start working towards your major essay right at the beginning of semester.  While there are a lot of assessments in the unit, most of them build on each other, so the work you put in to prepare for a Quiz in Week 3 will come to fruition in the richer Essay you submit in Week 13.  However, you will need to be organised.  We will remind you of upcoming deadlines, but you also need to keep close track of them yourself.

You’ll also need to talk to your fellow students, right from the beginning – we think you learn as much from each other as from listening to lectures and tutors.  Tutorials and also the iLearn site will give you an opportunity to discuss administrative and intellectual issues with your peers.

Even though some of the ideas, readings and tasks we’ll ask you to engage with are really challenging, we will give you lots of help and support in building towards (and then planning beyond) your Final Essay.  You will have opportunities to get feedback on your Outlines, and to get extra marks for a thoughtful contribution to class.

Opportunities for receiving feedback in MAS105

There are many opportunities for feedback on your ideas and understandings in MAS105. Sometimes you will be offered specific, direct feedback on your own individual work. Individual feedback on your understanding of readings and lectures is provided when the results and answers to the quiz are released from Week 3 onwards. Written feedback and marks will be provided by your tutor on your Essay Outline and your Final Essay. At other times, you will have the opportunity to get more general feedback on ideas and understanding as part of a group, for example, when you listen to peers and your tutor in tutorials or participate in interactive elements of lectures.

Unit Schedule

MAS105 Media Cultures, Semester 2, 2017

Please note: Lectures and tutorials begin in Week 1. There are no lecture or tutorials in Week 13. Students need to refer to iLearn for the weekly readings - all listed readings are essential.

Week 1: Convergent media, current contexts (July 31)

Week 2: How did we get here (Aug 7)

Week 3: What makes media change? (Aug 14)

Week 4: Global media flows (Aug 21)

Week 5: Measuring Media Audiences (Aug 28)

Week 6: Research and Writing (Sept 4)

Week 7: Vulnerable Viewers? (Sept 11)

MID-SEMESTER BREAK

Week 8: Regulating the media (October 2)

Week 9: Ownership (Oct 9)

Week 10: The end of public service broadcasting? (Oct 16)

Week 11: Social media, new public spheres? (Oct 23)

Week 12: Privacy or Participation? (Oct 30)

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Additional information

MMCCS website https://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/faculties_and_departments/faculty_of_arts/department_of_media_music_communication_and_cultural_studies/

MMCCS Session Re-mark Application http://www.mq.edu.au/pubstatic/public/download/?id=167914

Information is correct at the time of publication

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • analyse and critically evaluate key concepts in Media Studies
  • identify the ways new media technologies shape and are shaped by social, cultural, political and economic processes
  • distinguish between and evaluate various theoretical positions on media audiences, media industries, regulation and policy
  • undertake independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals
  • communicate ideas using appropriate academic discourses, both verbally and in a range of genres of writing, including abstracts and essays
  • reflect critically on their own academic work and use that reflection to plan for future assessments

Assessment tasks

  • Essay Outline
  • Online Weekly Quizzes
  • Final Essay
  • Active Contribution

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • analyse and critically evaluate key concepts in Media Studies
  • identify the ways new media technologies shape and are shaped by social, cultural, political and economic processes
  • distinguish between and evaluate various theoretical positions on media audiences, media industries, regulation and policy
  • undertake independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals
  • communicate ideas using appropriate academic discourses, both verbally and in a range of genres of writing, including abstracts and essays
  • reflect critically on their own academic work and use that reflection to plan for future assessments
  • engage actively in the process of learning

Assessment tasks

  • Essay Outline
  • Online Weekly Quizzes
  • Final Essay
  • Active Contribution

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • analyse and critically evaluate key concepts in Media Studies
  • identify the ways new media technologies shape and are shaped by social, cultural, political and economic processes
  • distinguish between and evaluate various theoretical positions on media audiences, media industries, regulation and policy
  • undertake independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals
  • communicate ideas using appropriate academic discourses, both verbally and in a range of genres of writing, including abstracts and essays
  • engage actively in the process of learning

Assessment tasks

  • Essay Outline
  • Online Weekly Quizzes
  • Final Essay

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • analyse and critically evaluate key concepts in Media Studies
  • identify the ways new media technologies shape and are shaped by social, cultural, political and economic processes
  • distinguish between and evaluate various theoretical positions on media audiences, media industries, regulation and policy
  • undertake independent academic research in the discipline, including identifying and using appropriate articles in academic journals
  • communicate ideas using appropriate academic discourses, both verbally and in a range of genres of writing, including abstracts and essays
  • reflect critically on their own academic work and use that reflection to plan for future assessments

Assessment tasks

  • Final Essay
  • Active Contribution

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • engage actively in the process of learning

Assessment task

  • Active Contribution

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment task

  • Active Contribution

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • analyse and critically evaluate key concepts in Media Studies
  • identify the ways new media technologies shape and are shaped by social, cultural, political and economic processes
  • distinguish between and evaluate various theoretical positions on media audiences, media industries, regulation and policy
  • communicate ideas using appropriate academic discourses, both verbally and in a range of genres of writing, including abstracts and essays
  • engage actively in the process of learning

Assessment tasks

  • Essay Outline
  • Online Weekly Quizzes
  • Final Essay
  • Active Contribution

Changes from Previous Offering

There have been some changes to weekly readings to reflect recent changes in the media. The weekly lectures have also been updated and lecturers have been changed to provide fresh areas of expertise within the course.

The Essay Outline has been moved from Week 5 to Week 7 so that students can draw on more of the unit material in their assessment. The Final Essay has been moved from Week 10 to Week 13, and the 'Essay Evaluation' in Week 13 has been removed so that students have more time to develop their Final Essay and to critically engage with the unit material.

The 'Quizzes' (online, multiple-choice) have been weighted more heavily at 25% rather than 20% and the 'Essay Outline' has been weighted at 25% instead of 20% to replace the 'Essay Evaluation' that was worth 10%.

'Participation' has been changed to 'Active Contribution' to more accurately reflect the aims of the assessment.

Readings are no longer available in the form of a reader, and are now listed on iLearn and can be accessed through the library.

The order of the weekly topics has been slightly amended to emphasise key topics earlier in the semester.

Extensions and Late Penalties

Assignments which are submitted late without a previously negotiated extension will incur a 5% late penalty per day (including weekends and public holidays).

Extensions on the final version may be granted if Disruption to Studies is approved, or may be approved at the convenor's discretion upon receipt of appropriate documentation in cases where Disruption to Studies may not be applicable. Please see the Disruption to Studies policy: http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html.

Please contact the convenor Dr Rachael Gunn via email BEFORE the due date if you have health issues and/or serious family difficulties that mean you are unable to submit one of the assessed items by the due date. You may be given a short extension.

If you are unable to attend a tutorial due to a brief illness such as a cold or flu, please contact your tutor by email to explain the circumstances. Your tutor will record the reason for your absence.

Students with prolonged adverse circumstances or a pre-existing disability/health condition may be eligible for ongoing assistance and support. Such support is governed by other policies and may be sought and coordinated through Campus Wellbeing and Support Services.