Logo Students

AHIS110 – Rome: From Republic to Empire

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

Pdf icon Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Tom Hillard
Contact via thomas.hillard@mq.edu.au
W6A 515
By appointment
Unit Convenor
Lea Beness
Contact via lea.beness@mq.edu.au
W6A 523
By appointment
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit concerns itself with the beginnings of the so-called Roman Revolution, paying special attention to the period from 168 BCE (the battle of Pydna) to Sulla's dictatorship. The main questions will be how and why the traditional political order was challenged and finally overrun by violence, leading to military autocracy and the radical transformation of the Republic. Larger social and economic developments in Italy and the Mediterranean and the distinctive features of the moral and political thought of the period will also be considered. The course is largely a study of the Roman nobility and its members' response to change and crisis.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. acquire knowledge of the Roman republican political process and of the fundamental political developments in Rome at the beginning of the so-called Roman Revolution;
  2. acquire basic research skills;
  3. acquire the skill to evaluate source material and, in particular, an ability to use ancient sources critically and evaluate modern interpretations of those sources;
  4. acquire the ability to formulate arguments and articulate ideas;
  5. acquire the ability to demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues that engage historians (for example, the factors that lead to social cohesion and the factors that lead to social and political dysfunction, the desirable qualities of political leadership);
  6. gain a lifelong ability to enjoy the study of ancient Rome and an inability to forget the word prosopography.

General Assessment Information

ASSESSMENT TASKS

1. Self-assessment Exercise: This exercise is compulsory but does not count towards your final grade.

You will provide ten short answers based on questions which relate to the lecture on "The Roman 'Constitution' & Roman Society" in Week 3. The tutorial this week will also touch upon the Roman political process. Feedback will be provided in the following week.

The aim of this exercise is to measure your understanding of the Roman republican political process which will form the basis for your future study of the political evolution of the Roman state in the period 168–80 BC.

It is due to be submitted on Thursday March 16th by 11.59pm.

 

2. Preparatory Exercise: This task counts only 10% towards your final grade.

We would like to give you as much feedback as possible as soon as possible in the session. As many of you will be undertaking this unit as the first in your university career, we are offering a very short exercise based on Tutorial Topic Two ('The Values and Goals of the Roman Nobility'), to ensure that you are familiar with the desired mode of presenting evidence and documenting an academic paper.

To that end we are asking that you submit a very short paper (of no more than 100 words) on the following topic:

Identify three important values of the Roman nobility, and provide the evidence from the ancient sources for our knowledge of each of these values. (The means of referencing your paper will be discussed at the preceding tutorial.)

In this exercise, we are looking for three distinct Roman aristocratic values found in the sources provided, clearly outlined (within the word limit), the citation of ancient evidence, clarity of presentation, good expression and grammatical accuracy. The exercise will be graded according to these criteria (e.g., systematic citation, number of sources cited, and standard of presentation). The paper should be written in prose, not point form.

This is what is termed a 'low-risk task'. It will count relatively little towards your final assessment (thus removing a good deal of pressure), but it will get you into the swing of things early; it is due to be submitted on Thursday March 30th by 11.59pm). The assignment is designed to assist you in the preparation for your essay.

The mode of desired referencing will be found on the Department of Ancient History website. Under 'Teaching Materials’:  <http://mq.edu.au/about_us/faculties_and_departments/faculty_of_arts/department_of_ancient_history/teaching_materials/>, you will find 'Essay Presentation Guides'. Go to 'Short Version (recommended for 100-level students)'. Further on the desired mode of referencing, see below, under ‘Essay’.

 

3. Source Dossier (worth 15% of your final grade):

In this exercise, you will construct a ‘source dossier’ of at least ten ancient sources on a particular Roman politician to be identified in Week 6 (from a variety of source material that will be discussed in class in Week 6). In this way you will become familiar with the different information that can be extracted from literary testimonia (i.e., written texts), epigraphical sources (i.e., inscriptions) and numismatic sources (i.e., coins).

Exercises will be graded according to the number of sources found, proper source citation and clarity of presentation. The assignment must be submitted on Thursday May 4th by 11.59pm.

 

4. Essay: One essay, counting for 35% of the final mark, is required.

The staff will prepare a full source dossier based upon the research we have undertaken together for the previous exercise. Using this dossier, you will submit a profile and an evaluation of the career of the same individual. The Essay is due Thursday May 25th by 11.59pm. (Fuller details will be supplied later in the course [in Week 6], together with guides to the exercise. This will be done in the day lecture at 12pm on Monday 3rd April.  (It is essential that you attend or listen to this lecture.)

This essay will be graded according to the rubrics provided on the iLearn site.

Please note that Ancient History Essay Presentation Guides are available on the Ancient History website (under ‘Teaching materials’):

<http://mq.edu.au/about_us/faculties_and_departments/faculty_of_arts/department_of_ancient_history/teaching_materials/>

 

5. Examination: There is a two-hour examination scheduled in the University Examination Period. It is worth 40% of the final assessment. It will include:

 (i) a compulsory question on the nature of Rome's crisis and the Republic’s strengths and weaknesses (which is here pre-circulated.)

"A state without the means of some change is without the means of its conservation." (Edmund Burke)

Discuss this proposition with regard to the Roman Republic between the period 168 and 80 BC.  Was the Roman Republic without the means of change? Was change the solution in your opinion? Discuss with regard to political developments between 168 and 80 BC. (In your answer, you should make specific references to the particular problems that Rome faced in this period and to the solutions proposed and/or enacted by various individuals.)

(ii) a set of ten short-answer questions testing your knowledge of the Roman political system (worth 10% of the overall examination mark); and

(iii) a range of passages for discussion (drawn from the passages that will be studied in lectures and tutorials).

IMPORTANT: The University Examination period in 1st Session 2016 is from 13th of June to 30th of June.

You are expected to present yourself for examination at the time and place designated in the University Examination Timetable. The timetable will be available in Draft form approximately eight weeks before the commencement of the examinations and in Final form approximately four weeks before the commencement of the examinations at: <http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/timetables>. The only exception to sitting an examination at the designated time is because of documented illness or unavoidable disruption. In these circumstances you may wish to consider applying for Special Consideration. To be eligible for Special Consideration, a student must notify the University of a serious and unavoidable disruption within five (5) working days of the commencement of the disruption (Disruption to Studies notification). All Disruption to Studies notifications are to be made online via the University’s Ask MQ system. Information about the unavoidable Disruption to Studies process is available under the 'Policies and Procedures' section of this Unit Guide. You are advised that it is Macquarie University policy not to set early examinations for individuals or groups of students. All students are expected to ensure that they are available until the end of the teaching semester, that is, the final day of the official examination period.

Criteria and standards required for the assessment tasks will be found on the unit iLearn site.

GRADING

The grade a student receives will signify their overall performance in meeting the learning outcomes of the unit. Grades will not be awarded by reference to the achievement of other students nor allocated to fit a predetermined distribution. In determining a grade, due weight will be given to the learning outcomes and level of the unit. Markers in the unit will use the following grades:

HD = High Distinction 85–100

D = Distinction 75–84

Cr = Credit 65–74

P = Pass 50–64

F = Fail 0–49

 

ASSIGNMENT SUBMISSION

All written work (apart from the examination) must be submitted through the iLearn website. Please upload your assignment to the drop-box under the relevant week. Save your assignment as a pdf or a doc file (a pdf is best). All assignment files should be saved with your full name in the label of the file. All assignments should include the following at the start: Student name; Student number; Assessment Task Title or Question.

Assessments 2 to 4 will be returned via the Turnitin tool on the iLearn Unit site and will contain feedback from the marker. Information about how to submit work online can be accessed through the iLearn unit site.

Over the course of AHIS110 your work will be marked by at least two members of staff.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Self-Assessment Exercise 0% Thursday of Week 3 by 11.59pm
Documentation exercise 10% Thursday of Week 5 by 11.59pm
Source Dossier 15% Thursday of Week 8 by 11.59pm
Prosopographical Paper 35% Thursday of Week 11 by 11.59pm
Examination 40% Examination period

Self-Assessment Exercise

Due: Thursday of Week 3 by 11.59pm
Weighting: 0%

You will provide ten short answers based on questions which relate to the lecture on "The Roman 'Constitution' & Roman Society" in Week 3. The tutorial this week will also touch upon the Roman political process. This exercise is compulsory but does not have an assessment weighting.

The aim of this exercise is to measure your understanding of the Roman republican political process which will form the basis for your future study of the political evolution of the Roman state in the period 168–80 BC.

You will self-assess your responses against the answers and feedback that we shall provide in the lectures of Week 4.

Your answers will have already been submitted electronically in a pdf or a doc/docx file using the Turnitin portal under Week 3 on the unit's iLearn website. This quiz will help prepare you for the short-answer questions in the examination at the end of the session.

Another aim of this exercise is for you to see how you are progressing in the unit. You might ask yourselves:

  • What have I learned about mid-Republican Rome so far in this unit?
  • Do I have a basic understanding of the way in which Roman government worked in 168 BC?
  • Am I confident that I can now use this knowledge to move on to a study of the way in which the Roman state changed in the period we shall now study?
  • How could I improve my approach?

The exercise is due on Thursday 16th March by 11.59pm.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • acquire knowledge of the Roman republican political process and of the fundamental political developments in Rome at the beginning of the so-called Roman Revolution;
  • acquire the ability to formulate arguments and articulate ideas;

Documentation exercise

Due: Thursday of Week 5 by 11.59pm
Weighting: 10%

A very short exercise (or not more than 100 words) designed to ensure that students are familiar with the desired mode of presenting evidence and documenting an academic paper.

The paper will be submitted electronically via the Turnitin portal under Week 5 on the unit's iLearn website.

The exercise is due on Thursday 30th March by 11.59pm.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • acquire knowledge of the Roman republican political process and of the fundamental political developments in Rome at the beginning of the so-called Roman Revolution;
  • acquire basic research skills;
  • acquire the skill to evaluate source material and, in particular, an ability to use ancient sources critically and evaluate modern interpretations of those sources;
  • acquire the ability to demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues that engage historians (for example, the factors that lead to social cohesion and the factors that lead to social and political dysfunction, the desirable qualities of political leadership);
  • gain a lifelong ability to enjoy the study of ancient Rome and an inability to forget the word prosopography.

Source Dossier

Due: Thursday of Week 8 by 11.59pm
Weighting: 15%

This will serve as a preliminary research exercise that will lead to the completion of the main essay. Students will find ten ancient sources on a designated Roman political figure. Precise details will be discussed in a lecture devoted to the exercise and will be posted on the iLearn website.

It will introduce students to the necessary research skills that they will carry forward into further studies of the ancient world.

The source dossier will be submitted electronically via the Turnitin portal under Week 8 on the unit's iLearn website.

The source dossier is due on Thursday 4th May by 11.59pm.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • acquire knowledge of the Roman republican political process and of the fundamental political developments in Rome at the beginning of the so-called Roman Revolution;
  • acquire basic research skills;
  • gain a lifelong ability to enjoy the study of ancient Rome and an inability to forget the word prosopography.

Prosopographical Paper

Due: Thursday of Week 11 by 11.59pm
Weighting: 35%

A prosopographical exercise, built upon the previous assignment, designed to promote a deeper understanding of the ethos of the Roman ruling elite and to introduce students to the ways in which modern historical analysis rests upon ancient evidence.

The exercise will introduce students to the mobilisation and synthesis of evidence and the evaluation of alternative modern interpretations, techniques that they will carry forward into further studies of the ancient world.

The essay proper should be no more than 1000 words. The associated elogium should be no more than 250 words.

The paper will be submitted electronically via the Turnitin portal under Week 11 on the unit's iLearn website.

The paper is due on Thursday 25th May by 11.59pm.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • acquire knowledge of the Roman republican political process and of the fundamental political developments in Rome at the beginning of the so-called Roman Revolution;
  • acquire basic research skills;
  • acquire the skill to evaluate source material and, in particular, an ability to use ancient sources critically and evaluate modern interpretations of those sources;
  • acquire the ability to formulate arguments and articulate ideas;
  • acquire the ability to demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues that engage historians (for example, the factors that lead to social cohesion and the factors that lead to social and political dysfunction, the desirable qualities of political leadership);
  • gain a lifelong ability to enjoy the study of ancient Rome and an inability to forget the word prosopography.

Examination

Due: Examination period
Weighting: 40%

A two hour examination on all course content.

Students are expected to present themselves for the examination at the time and place designated. The timetable will be available in Draft form approximately eight weeks before the commencement of the examinations and in Final form approximately four weeks before the commencement of the examinations at: <http://www.timetables.mq.edu.au/exam>.

The only exception to sitting an examination at the designated time is documented illness or unavoidable disruption. In these circumstances, you should submit a Disruption to Studies notification. Information about unavoidable disruption is available under the Policies and Procedures section of this Unit Guide and in the separate Disruption to Studies section below. If a Supplementary Examination is granted as a result of this process, the examination will be scheduled after the conclusion of the official examination period. You are advised that it is Macquarie University policy not to set early examinations for individuals or groups of students. All students are expected to ensure that they are available until the end of the teaching semester, that is, the final day of the official examination period.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • acquire knowledge of the Roman republican political process and of the fundamental political developments in Rome at the beginning of the so-called Roman Revolution;
  • acquire the skill to evaluate source material and, in particular, an ability to use ancient sources critically and evaluate modern interpretations of those sources;
  • acquire the ability to formulate arguments and articulate ideas;
  • acquire the ability to demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues that engage historians (for example, the factors that lead to social cohesion and the factors that lead to social and political dysfunction, the desirable qualities of political leadership);

Delivery and Resources

ABOUT THIS UNIT

This unit concerns itself with the beginning of the Roman Republic's drift towards its political collapse, and in particular with the beginnings of the so-called "Roman Revolution". Special attention will be paid to the period from 168 BC, when Roman troops destroyed the Macedonian army at the battle of Pydna, to the establishment of Sulla's dictatorship (82–80 BC), when the age of the General was at hand and the Republic's days were numbered. Developments in this period, both internal and external, are of critical significance in the history of western civilization. We look closely at traditional political and social institutions, values and practice, and try to assess the effect on these of Rome's emergence as the dominating power in the Mediterranean. The main questions will be how and why the traditional political order was challenged and finally overrun by violence leading to military autocracy and the radical transformation of the Republic. Larger social and economic developments in Italy and the Mediterranean will need to be addressed, and the distinctive features of the moral and political thought of the period will also be considered. The course is largely a study of the Roman nobility and its members' response to change and crisis.

 

CLASSES

For lecture times and classrooms please consult the MQ Timetable website: <http://www.timetables.mq.edu.au>. This website will display up-to-date information on classes and classroom locations.

Lectures: The lectures for this unit will be recorded and the audio recordings can be downloaded or streamed via the Echo 360 system which can be accessed via the iLearn site.

Tutorials: Topics for discussion and questions to be addressed are set out under the appropriate week on the iLearn unit site. All tutorials will focus upon the historiographical aspects of studying this period and the material covered will form an essential preparation for your responses in Part (i) in the Examination. Preparation for each tutorial is advised, since the material covered in these sessions will be examined. Only by reading the material set for discussion in advance will you receive the full benefit of these sessions.

There are tutorials each week for most weeks of the session (but not in Weeks 2, 8 and 11). We hope that participation in these discussions will be a vital and rewarding part of the unit.

 

RESOURCES

Required Reading and Texts

(i)      Ancient Sources

All students are expected to have a copy of the ancient sources listed below. All tutorial exercises which do not draw on material in the Unit Book of Readings (see below) will be based on source material in these works.

Plutarch Roman Lives: A Selection of Eight Lives (Oxford World's Classics)*

Appian The Civil Wars (Penguin Classics)

* Please note that the Lives of Plutarch that are covered in this unit are also available in two Penguin editions: Plutarch Makers of Rome (Penguin Classics) and Plutarch The Fall of the Roman Republic (Penguin Classics). These two books could be purchased as an alternative to the first of the two books above.

Other essential ancient sources to which reference will be made in the lectures have been compiled in a Book of Readings The Roman Republic in Crisis (revised edition) which will be available at the beginning of the session. It should be brought to all lectures and tutorials.

NOTE

In this course emphasis is placed upon the direct examination of the ancient sources and evidence. Students are expected to base all their work on a personal examination of these sources. It will not be sufficient simply to read modern studies on any topic, however sound and highly recommended these are: it will be essential to look first at the ancient sources on which all modern studies are necessarily based.

 

(ii)     Modern Studies

A useful textbook account for the period will be found in H.H. Scullard, From the Gracchi to Nero (5th edition, 1982) whose notes on pp. 381ff. provide reference to more recent modern studies. It is highly recommended for background reading. An online version of Scullard is available through the Library website via 'Unit Readings' for AHIS110.

Required and recommended texts are available for purchase at the Co-Op bookstore <http://www.coop-bookshop.com.au>.

Shorter paperbacks which provide an introduction to Republican history and a background to the period we are studying are:

Michael Crawford, The Roman Republic (Fontana, 1978); P.A. Brunt, Social Conflicts in the Roman Republic (Chatto & Windus, 1971); David Shotter, The Fall of the Roman Republic (2nd edition, Routledge, 2005); and Catherine Steel, The End of the Roman Republic 146 to 44 BC. Conquest and Crisis (Edinburgh University Press, 2013).

These (the last two especially) are readily available and are recommended for purchase to those wanting a wider perspective.

A stocktaking of modern scholarship and a useful summation of many of the problematic issues arising in this topic will be found in M. Beard and M. Crawford Rome in the Late Republic. Problems and Interpretations (London, 1985). Even more recent introductions to various themes is provided by Harriet I. Flower (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Republic (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2004), designed for readers new to the subject; and Nathan Rosenstein and Robert Morstein-Marx (eds), A Companion to the Roman Republic (Oxford, Blackwell, 2006).

There are two essential works of reference for the course which are to be consulted in the Library:

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (abbreviated OCD) is the standard work of reference in English for Roman and Greek history and culture.  It provides reliable and succinct explanations and definitions of technical terms, summary biographies of prominent individuals, and accounts of institutions, etc.

T.R.S. Broughton The Magistrates of the Roman Republic (abbrev. MRR; 2 vols, 1951-2; Vol. 1 covers the period 509-100 BC; vol. 2 the period 99-31 BC), copies of which will be held in Reserve.  This is an invaluable book which gives, year by year, a full, systematic list of the known political officials and magistrates, a summary of their actions in office and full references to the known ancient sources. A supplementary volume (vol. III) was published in 1986.

Also to be regarded as a standard work of reference is J.A. Crook et al. (ed.), The Cambridge Ancient History vol. IX2 (Cambridge University Press, 1994).

More detailed reading lists relating to particular topics will be made available electronically on the iLearn unit site. The most important recommended books and articles will be held either in Reserve in the Library or will be available electronically via 'Unit Readings' on the Library website.

 

UNIT WEBPAGE AND TECHNOLOGY USED AND REQUIRED

This unit will use iLearn: <https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/login/MQ/>. PC and Internet access are therefore required. Basic computer skills (e.g., internet browsing) and skills in word processing are also a requirement. Please consult teaching staff for any further, more specific requirements.

 

SATISFACTORY COMPLETION OF UNIT

Attendance

It is expected that students attend lectures and tutorials and that they spend 9 hours per week on individual study and participation in class across the 15 weeks of the session.

There are two lectures a week and one tutorial per week for most weeks of the session, at which attendance is expected. The importance of regular attendance is reflected in the final examination in which questions are drawn directly from material covered in the lectures and tutorials.

Students must attempt each of the 5 assessment tasks and achieve an overall mark of 50% or above to complete the unit satisfactorily.

 

 

 

 

 

Unit Schedule

AHIS110   ROME: From Republic to Empire

Lecture and Tutorial Program

N.B. This schedule may be altered according to the availability of guest lecturers.

 

Week 1

Lecture 1: Introduction to the Course

Lecture 2: The Culture of Republican Rome

Tutorial: There are TUTORIALS in the first week but they will be introductory (no preparation required).

 

Week 2

Lecture 1: The Rise of Rome I

Lecture 2: The Rise of Rome II

Tutorial: THERE ARE NO TUTORIALS THIS WEEK. Use the time to do your preparatory reading for next week's tutorial topic on Rome's Destruction of Carthage and to familiarize yourself with the Unit Guide and the AHIS110 iLearn site.

 

Week 3

Lecture 1: The Roman 'Constitution' & Roman Society

Lecture 2: Scipio Aemilianus

Tutorial Discussion Topic: Rome's Destruction of Carthage

 

Week 4

Lecture 1: Scipio Aemilianus

Lecture 2: Scipio Aemilianus

Tutorial Discussion Topic: The Values and Goals of the Roman Nobility

 

Week 5

Lecture 1: Problems facing Rome in the mid-2nd Century I (military)

Lecture 2: Problems facing Rome in the mid-2nd Century II (agrarian/slave)

Tutorial Discussion Topic: The Attitudes and Values of Cato the Elder

 

Week 6

Lecture 1: Essential Essay Preparation: an introduction to prosopography

Lecture 2: Problems facing Rome in the mid-2nd Century III (urban problems)

Tutorial Discussion Topic: The Introduction of the Secret Ballot (discussion led by tutors)

                  and an auxiliary discussion of the Source Dossier and Essay

 

Week 7

Lecture 1: Tiberius Gracchus (early career)

Lecture 2: Tiberius Gracchus (reform and revolution: the crisis of 133 BC)

Tutorial Discussion Topic:  The Latin Sources for Tiberius Gracchus

 

__________________________________________________________

MID-SESSION RECESS (two weeks)

__________________________________________________________

 

Week 8

Lecture 1: Archaeological Evidence for the Gracchan Land Program (Dr Lea Beness)

Lecture 2: The Crisis of 129 BC: the Politics of Anxiety

Tutorial: THERE ARE NO TUTORIALS THIS WEEK. You will be working on Assessment 3 (due this week).

 

Week 9

Lecture 1: Gaius Gracchus (early career and character)

Lecture 2: Gaius Gracchus (reform program)

Tutorial Discussion Topic: Greek Sources on the Deposition of M. Octavius and the Death of

Tiberius Gracchus

 

Week 10

Lecture 1: The assassination of Gaius Gracchus and the Rise of Marius

Lecture 2: The Extraordinary Military Career of Marius

Tutorial Discussion Topic: The Letter of Cornelia, mother of the Gracchi

 

Week 11

Lecture 1: Saturninus and Political Violence

Lecture 2: The Italian Question and the Italian War

Tutorial: THERE ARE NO TUTORIALS THIS WEEK. You will be working on Assessment 4 (due this week).

 

Week 12

Lecture 1: Sulla, Pompeius Strabo, Cinna and Civil War

Lecture 2: The Cinnan dominatio and the Return of Sulla

Tutorial Discussion Topic: Marius' Consular Speech and Plutarch's Life of Marius (in the first part we return to the topic of Roman elite values and in the second we focus on historiography in preparation for the examination).

 

Week 13

Lecture 1: Sulla's Dictatorship

Lecture 2: Epilogue: from Sulla to Augustus

Tutorial Discussion Topic: Sulla's memoirs and Plutarch's Life of Sulla (This tutorial will also focus on historiographical issues in preparation for the examination.)

 

Friday June 9th                     Last day of classes (Valete!)

Tuesday June 13th               Examination Period begins (All the best!)

Friday June 30th                   Examination Period ends (Have a good break!)

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

ACADEMIC HONESTY

Academic honesty is an integral part of the core values and principles contained in the Macquarie University Ethics Statement:

<http://www.mq.edu.au/ethics/ethic-statement-final.html>

Its fundamental principle is that all staff and students act with integrity in the creation, development, application and use of ideas and information. This means that:

  • All academic work claimed as original is the work of the author making the claim.
  • All academic collaborations are acknowledged.
  • When the works and/or ideas of others are used, these are acknowledged appropriately.
  • Academic work is not falsified in any way

The link below has more details about the policy, procedure and schedule of penalties that will apply to breaches of the Academic Honesty Policy which can be viewed at:

<http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html>

The Learning Skills team (see below) has created a self-paced iLearn unit to teach students about academic integrity.  The Academic Integrity Module for Students will raise your awareness of your responsibilities and rights concerning academic integrity and acceptable academic practices at Macquarie University. You can self-enrol in the module via the Learning Skills website <http://www.students.mq.edu.au/support/learning_skills/academic_integrity_module_for_students/>. 

This is a self-directed module and takes about one hour to complete.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Arts Student Centre

Phone:

+61 2 9850 6783

Email:

artsenquiries@mq.edu.au

Office:

W6A/Foyer

Centre staff are there to smooth the way into university life; answer questions; give informed advice; provide a sympathetic ear; and de-mystify university ways and procedures.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • acquire basic research skills;
  • acquire the ability to formulate arguments and articulate ideas;

Assessment tasks

  • Documentation exercise
  • Source Dossier
  • Prosopographical Paper

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • acquire the ability to demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues that engage historians (for example, the factors that lead to social cohesion and the factors that lead to social and political dysfunction, the desirable qualities of political leadership);

Assessment tasks

  • Documentation exercise
  • Prosopographical Paper

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • acquire the ability to demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues that engage historians (for example, the factors that lead to social cohesion and the factors that lead to social and political dysfunction, the desirable qualities of political leadership);

Assessment tasks

  • Documentation exercise
  • Prosopographical Paper

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • acquire basic research skills;
  • acquire the ability to demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues that engage historians (for example, the factors that lead to social cohesion and the factors that lead to social and political dysfunction, the desirable qualities of political leadership);
  • gain a lifelong ability to enjoy the study of ancient Rome and an inability to forget the word prosopography.

Assessment tasks

  • Documentation exercise
  • Source Dossier
  • Prosopographical Paper

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • acquire basic research skills;
  • acquire the skill to evaluate source material and, in particular, an ability to use ancient sources critically and evaluate modern interpretations of those sources;
  • acquire the ability to formulate arguments and articulate ideas;
  • acquire the ability to demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues that engage historians (for example, the factors that lead to social cohesion and the factors that lead to social and political dysfunction, the desirable qualities of political leadership);

Assessment tasks

  • Documentation exercise
  • Source Dossier
  • Prosopographical Paper
  • Examination

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • acquire the ability to formulate arguments and articulate ideas;

Assessment tasks

  • Prosopographical Paper
  • Examination

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • acquire basic research skills;
  • acquire the skill to evaluate source material and, in particular, an ability to use ancient sources critically and evaluate modern interpretations of those sources;
  • acquire the ability to formulate arguments and articulate ideas;

Assessment tasks

  • Self-Assessment Exercise
  • Documentation exercise
  • Source Dossier
  • Prosopographical Paper
  • Examination

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • acquire knowledge of the Roman republican political process and of the fundamental political developments in Rome at the beginning of the so-called Roman Revolution;
  • acquire basic research skills;
  • acquire the skill to evaluate source material and, in particular, an ability to use ancient sources critically and evaluate modern interpretations of those sources;
  • acquire the ability to formulate arguments and articulate ideas;
  • acquire the ability to demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues that engage historians (for example, the factors that lead to social cohesion and the factors that lead to social and political dysfunction, the desirable qualities of political leadership);
  • gain a lifelong ability to enjoy the study of ancient Rome and an inability to forget the word prosopography.

Assessment tasks

  • Self-Assessment Exercise
  • Documentation exercise
  • Source Dossier
  • Prosopographical Paper
  • Examination

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • acquire basic research skills;
  • acquire the skill to evaluate source material and, in particular, an ability to use ancient sources critically and evaluate modern interpretations of those sources;
  • acquire the ability to formulate arguments and articulate ideas;
  • acquire the ability to demonstrate an appreciation of the larger issues that engage historians (for example, the factors that lead to social cohesion and the factors that lead to social and political dysfunction, the desirable qualities of political leadership);

Assessment tasks

  • Self-Assessment Exercise
  • Documentation exercise
  • Source Dossier
  • Prosopographical Paper
  • Examination

Changes from Previous Offering

A self-assessment exercise has been added (in Week 3) to allow students to assess whether they have acquired the basic knowledge and analytical skills that will form the basis of the rest of the work they will undertake in the unit and to allow staff to give students general feedback.

Assignment Submission and Extensions

ASSIGNMENT SUBMISSION

All written work (apart from that generated in the examination) must be submitted through the iLearn website. Please upload your assignment to the drop-box under the relevant week. Save your assignment as a pdf or a doc/docx file (a pdf is best). All assignment files should be saved with your full name in the label of the file. All assignments should include the following at the start: Student name; Student number; Assessment Task Title or Question.

Information about how to submit work online can be accessed through the iLearn unit site.

ASSIGNMENT LENGTH

Markers will not read assignments which are more than 10% over the specified word length. Please note that footnotes and bibliography do not count in the word length in this particular unit. (You should not expect that this will be the case in other units that you are undertaking.)

ASSIGNMENT RETURN

Assessments 2 to 4 will be returned via the Turnitin tool on the iLearn Unit site and will contain feedback from the marker. Every effort will be made to return assignments in a timely fashion.

EXTENSIONS AND PENALTIES FOR LATE SUBMISSION OF WORK

Extensions for assignments can only be granted for serious and unavoidable disruptions that arise after a study period has commenced and may only be sought in consultation with the unit convenor and with the support of documentary evidence. If you anticipate any difficulty in meeting due dates for assignments then it is important that you contact one of the unit convenors as early as possible and before the deadline. Without documentation (e.g. medical or counselling certificates) or prior staff approval, a penalty of 2% a day, including weekends, will be applied. Note that it is essential that applications for extensions should be made before the assignment's due date. (For students who have suffered serious and unavoidable disruption to their studies, see further under 'Disruption to Studies Policy' below.)

EXTENSION REQUEST PROCEDURE

The granting of extensions is subject to the University's Disruptions Policy: http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html.

Disruption to Studies

If you require an extension, you will be required to submit a 'Disruption to Studies' Notification. Please follow the procedure below:

  1. Visit https://ask.mq.edu.au/account/forms/display/disruptions and use your OneID to log in.
  2. Select your unit code from the drop down list and fill in your relevant details. Note: A notification needs to be submitted for each unit you believe is affected by the disruption.
  3. Click "Submit form".
  4. Attach supporting documents by clicking 'Add a note/attachment', click 'browse' and navigating to the files you want to attach, then click 'submit note' to send your notification and supporting documents
  5. Please keep copies of your original documents, as they may be requested in the future as part of the assessment process.

Please ensure that supporting documentation is included with your request. Notify one of your unit convenors via your iLearn dialogue box if you are submitting a 'Disruption to Studies' Notification. Your request will be considered once all the documentation has been received. If you have issues, please contact one of your unit convenors via the dialogue tool immediately.

N.B. (NOTA BENE), i.e. NOTE WELL: You should always keep a copy of completed assignment tasks in case of loss.

Disruption to Studies

DISRUPTION TO STUDIES POLICY

<http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html>

This Policy applies only to serious and unavoidable disruptions that arise after a study period has commenced. Such disruptions commonly result from personal, social or domestic circumstances and may include illness (either physical or psychological), accident, injury, societal demands (such as jury service), bereavement, family breakdown or unexpected changes in employment situations.

Notification of Disruption to Studies

In order to support students who have experienced serious and unavoidable disruption, the University will provide affected students with an additional opportunity to demonstrate that they have met the learning outcomes of a unit.

An additional opportunity provided under such circumstances is referred to as Special Consideration. Special Consideration will be granted after careful evaluation of evidence supporting a notification for disruption to studies.

 

DISRUPTION TO STUDIES NOTIFICATION

It is a student’s responsibility to notify the University of their circumstances. All students of the University have the right to provide notification of a disruption to studies.

A student may notify the University of a disruption to their studies regardless of whether the disruption meets the serious and unavoidable criteria.

To be eligible for Special Consideration, a student must notify the University of a serious and unavoidable disruption within five (5) working days of the commencement of the disruption (Disruption to Studies notification).  

All Disruption to Studies notifications are to be made online via the University’s Ask MQ system.

Students granted a Disruption to Studies may by awarded an Incomplete Grade in first session results released in mid-July.