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PSY 247 – Perception I

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Kevin Brooks
Contact via kevin.brooks@mq.edu.au
C3A 405
Lecturer
Anna Fiveash
Contact via anna.fiveash@mq.edu.au
AHH 3.320
Lecturer
Kim Curby
Contact via kim.curby@mq.edu.au
C3A 409
Head Tutor
Max Farrell-Whelan
Contact via maxfarrell@live.com
N/A
Tutor
Soheil Afshar
Contact via soheil.afshar@mq.edu.au
C3A 414
Administration
Faculty of Human Sciences Undergraduate Student Service Centre
Contact via 9850 9898
Ground floor C3A
Co-convenor
Eugene Chekaluk
Contact via eugene.chekaluk@mq.edu.au
C3A 527
Tutor
Amanda Killian
Contact via amanda.killian@mq.edu.au
C3A 429
Tutor
Daniel Sturman
Contact via daniel.sturman@mq.edu.au
TBA
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
PSY105(P) or PSYC105 or COGS100
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
Perception, using the senses, is an organism's only link to the outside world. As the only method for our brain to absorb information, perceptual processes mediate what we believe is real and everything we have ever learned. This unit investigates the mechanisms of perception through all of the major senses, giving special attention to the best understood sense of all: vision. We explore aspects from the physiological bases of the senses to the rich and complex experiences and illusions that they produce, answering questions such as 'How do 3D movies work?', 'How do we know which way is up?', 'Why are some people colour-blind?', 'What do wine-tasters know that I don't?', 'How can we tell the pitch of a musical note?', and 'How do we tell our friends from strangers?'

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. • identify, define and demonstrate an understanding of the key terms and processes in Perception • discuss key theories and research in Perception • locate, identify and demonstrate an understanding of the function of key structures in the physiology of human sensory systems • explain the cause of many different perceptual phenomena in terms of perceptual and physiological processes and principles
  2. • understand the difference between the “real” world (what is) and the “phenomenological” world (what seems to be) • apply perceptual and physiological principles to understanding the phenomenological world • critically evaluate designs and analyses in perceptual psychology • interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions • critically evaluate perceptual theories and arguments • review and critique literature on Perception • competently use information technology applications e.g. e-mail, web-browsers, etc.
  3. • select an appropriate design and methodology for the measurement of perceptual phenomena • apply knowledge to solving problems and evaluating ideas and information • describe and interpret data presented in graphical form • competently access, use and synthesise information
  4. • display creative thinking skills • develop new ideas and theories and construct cohesive arguments • present ideas in new and creative ways • consider problems from new perspectives
  5. • demonstrate effective writing skills • display effective discussion skills • express ideas with clarity and concision • communicate complex ideas simply • present information in a coherent and integrated way
  6. • apply and adapt knowledge to the real world • recognise the strengths and limitations of Perception in gathering “facts” • present a convincing argument for the importance of the study of Perception • present a balanced critical view of Perception • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with infants and children • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with animals • reflect on how perception may influence your opinions or beliefs
  7. • demonstrate effective time management and work organisation skills • assess your own learning against a set of pre-selected criteria • reflect on how you have analysed information and solved problems, and incorporate lessons learnt into future work

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Online Quizzes (with Feedback) 16% Various
Practical Worksheets 9% Practical Sessions
Mid-session Test 25% No 4pm 18/04/17 (1st wk of break)
Final Exam 50% TBA

Online Quizzes (with Feedback)

Due: Various
Weighting: 16%

From week 3 onwards, each lecture is associated with an online quiz, administered via iLearn. There is no lecture (and hence no quiz) in the week of the study break, giving a total of 10 quizzes.

Each online quiz will contain several multiple-choice questions that will test students’ understanding of the core concepts from preceding lectures. These tests must be completed individually by each student. Although reference materials may be used, it is advised that students also prepare for each quiz by reviewing the relevant material before attempting the questions. The online quizzes will be delivered via the online iLearn webpage for the unit. Therefore, access to a reliable computer that connects to the Internet is required. Technical difficulties will not be accepted as a reason for special consideration. Students will have precisely one week (from the beginning of the lecture) to complete each quiz. The online quizzes should take no longer than 20 minutes to complete. Detailed feedback on your performance will be provided at the end of the week in which the quiz is made available. The scores for your best 8 quizzes will be counted in your final mark, each contributing 2%.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • • identify, define and demonstrate an understanding of the key terms and processes in Perception • discuss key theories and research in Perception • locate, identify and demonstrate an understanding of the function of key structures in the physiology of human sensory systems • explain the cause of many different perceptual phenomena in terms of perceptual and physiological processes and principles
  • • understand the difference between the “real” world (what is) and the “phenomenological” world (what seems to be) • apply perceptual and physiological principles to understanding the phenomenological world • critically evaluate designs and analyses in perceptual psychology • interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions • critically evaluate perceptual theories and arguments • review and critique literature on Perception • competently use information technology applications e.g. e-mail, web-browsers, etc.
  • • select an appropriate design and methodology for the measurement of perceptual phenomena • apply knowledge to solving problems and evaluating ideas and information • describe and interpret data presented in graphical form • competently access, use and synthesise information
  • • display creative thinking skills • develop new ideas and theories and construct cohesive arguments • present ideas in new and creative ways • consider problems from new perspectives
  • • demonstrate effective writing skills • display effective discussion skills • express ideas with clarity and concision • communicate complex ideas simply • present information in a coherent and integrated way
  • • apply and adapt knowledge to the real world • recognise the strengths and limitations of Perception in gathering “facts” • present a convincing argument for the importance of the study of Perception • present a balanced critical view of Perception • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with infants and children • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with animals • reflect on how perception may influence your opinions or beliefs
  • • demonstrate effective time management and work organisation skills • assess your own learning against a set of pre-selected criteria • reflect on how you have analysed information and solved problems, and incorporate lessons learnt into future work

Practical Worksheets

Due: Practical Sessions
Weighting: 9%

Format: 10 questions each. Various topics covered in the 4 pracs. 3% for each of your best 3 worksheets. Duration: To be completed within each of your practical sessions.

Worksheets must be completed and handed in during the practical that you attend. Worksheets will not be distributed or accepted at other times. Students who, for legitimate reasons, are unable to attend practicals and hence are unable to submit these worksheets, and who fear that this may affect their final score for this component of the assessments must advise the FHSUSSC via ask.mq.edu.au and submit appropriate supporting documents. Original documents need to be presented at the FHSUSSC. This should be done within five (5) working days from the day of the absence.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • • identify, define and demonstrate an understanding of the key terms and processes in Perception • discuss key theories and research in Perception • locate, identify and demonstrate an understanding of the function of key structures in the physiology of human sensory systems • explain the cause of many different perceptual phenomena in terms of perceptual and physiological processes and principles
  • • understand the difference between the “real” world (what is) and the “phenomenological” world (what seems to be) • apply perceptual and physiological principles to understanding the phenomenological world • critically evaluate designs and analyses in perceptual psychology • interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions • critically evaluate perceptual theories and arguments • review and critique literature on Perception • competently use information technology applications e.g. e-mail, web-browsers, etc.
  • • select an appropriate design and methodology for the measurement of perceptual phenomena • apply knowledge to solving problems and evaluating ideas and information • describe and interpret data presented in graphical form • competently access, use and synthesise information
  • • display creative thinking skills • develop new ideas and theories and construct cohesive arguments • present ideas in new and creative ways • consider problems from new perspectives
  • • demonstrate effective writing skills • display effective discussion skills • express ideas with clarity and concision • communicate complex ideas simply • present information in a coherent and integrated way
  • • apply and adapt knowledge to the real world • recognise the strengths and limitations of Perception in gathering “facts” • present a convincing argument for the importance of the study of Perception • present a balanced critical view of Perception • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with infants and children • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with animals • reflect on how perception may influence your opinions or beliefs
  • • demonstrate effective time management and work organisation skills • assess your own learning against a set of pre-selected criteria • reflect on how you have analysed information and solved problems, and incorporate lessons learnt into future work

Mid-session Test

Due: 4pm 18/04/17 (1st wk of break)
Weighting: 25%

Format: 30 multiple choice questions [MCQs]

Duration: 1hr (+10mins reading time).

This test will assess all topics covered before the mid-semester break.

It will take place during the mid-session recess.

The following locations will be used:

  • Students with surnames beginning with letters A-H:     X5B T1
  • Students with surnames beginning with letters I-Z:       W6D Lotus Theatre

Students who are unable to sit the mid-semester exam at the specified time must advise the Student Centre via ask.mq.edu.au and must also apply for Disruption to Studies through ask.mq.edu and submit appropriate supporting documents. Original documents need to be presented at the Student Centre. This should be done within five (5) working days from the day of the examination. It should be noted that Macquarie University Policy states: "Pre-booked holidays will not routinely be considered unavoidable absences or commitments by the University". Students deemed eligible for a late mid-semester exam will be notified via email about the time and location of the exam. There will only be one time.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • • identify, define and demonstrate an understanding of the key terms and processes in Perception • discuss key theories and research in Perception • locate, identify and demonstrate an understanding of the function of key structures in the physiology of human sensory systems • explain the cause of many different perceptual phenomena in terms of perceptual and physiological processes and principles
  • • understand the difference between the “real” world (what is) and the “phenomenological” world (what seems to be) • apply perceptual and physiological principles to understanding the phenomenological world • critically evaluate designs and analyses in perceptual psychology • interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions • critically evaluate perceptual theories and arguments • review and critique literature on Perception • competently use information technology applications e.g. e-mail, web-browsers, etc.
  • • select an appropriate design and methodology for the measurement of perceptual phenomena • apply knowledge to solving problems and evaluating ideas and information • describe and interpret data presented in graphical form • competently access, use and synthesise information
  • • display creative thinking skills • develop new ideas and theories and construct cohesive arguments • present ideas in new and creative ways • consider problems from new perspectives
  • • demonstrate effective writing skills • display effective discussion skills • express ideas with clarity and concision • communicate complex ideas simply • present information in a coherent and integrated way
  • • apply and adapt knowledge to the real world • recognise the strengths and limitations of Perception in gathering “facts” • present a convincing argument for the importance of the study of Perception • present a balanced critical view of Perception • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with infants and children • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with animals • reflect on how perception may influence your opinions or beliefs
  • • demonstrate effective time management and work organisation skills • assess your own learning against a set of pre-selected criteria • reflect on how you have analysed information and solved problems, and incorporate lessons learnt into future work

Final Exam

Due: TBA
Weighting: 50%

Format: 60 MCQs

Duration: 2hr (+10mins reading time).

This exam will assess only the aspects of the course on vision, plus the multisensory lecture. Some information from the introduction and general principles lecture will also be relevant, as much of this lecture applies to all of the senses. The time and location for this exam will be timetabled centrally, and announced later in the semester.

You are expected to present yourself for examination at the time and place designated in the University Examination Timetable. The timetable will be available in Draft form approximately eight weeks before the commencement of the examinations and in Final form approximately four weeks before the commencement of the examinations.    http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/exams/ The only exception to sitting an examination at the designated time is because of documented illness or unavoidable disruption. In these circumstances you may wish to consider applying for special consideration due to disruption to studies.  Information about unavoidable disruption and the special consideration process is available at  http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/exams/disruption_to_studies/

If a Supplementary Examination is granted as a result of the Disruption to Studies process, the examination will be scheduled after the conclusion of the official examination period. The format of a supplementary examination is at each unit convenor’s discretion and is subject to change from the original final examination. Supplementary Exams are only offered to students who have satisfactorily completed all other assessments for the unit and were unable to sit the final exam because of documented illness or unavoidable disruption. Instructions on applying for sitting of a supplementary exam are available from the website, www.psy.mq.edu.au/speccond.  It is the student’s responsibility to follow the steps outlined on this website. An email will be sent to the student advising them of the outcome of their request for a supplementary exam. If a supplementary exam has been granted it is the student’s responsibility to check the Department of Psychology Special Consideration website for information relating to the date and location of the supplementary exam. Students who are granted to sit for a supplementary exam must make themselves available to sit for the supplementary exam on the specified date. There will only be one time. It is the student’s responsibility to email Student Centre to confirm attendance at the supplementary exam.

You are advised that it is Macquarie University policy not to set early examinations for individuals or groups of students. All students are expected to ensure that they are available until the end of the teaching semester, which is the final day of the official examination period.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • • identify, define and demonstrate an understanding of the key terms and processes in Perception • discuss key theories and research in Perception • locate, identify and demonstrate an understanding of the function of key structures in the physiology of human sensory systems • explain the cause of many different perceptual phenomena in terms of perceptual and physiological processes and principles
  • • understand the difference between the “real” world (what is) and the “phenomenological” world (what seems to be) • apply perceptual and physiological principles to understanding the phenomenological world • critically evaluate designs and analyses in perceptual psychology • interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions • critically evaluate perceptual theories and arguments • review and critique literature on Perception • competently use information technology applications e.g. e-mail, web-browsers, etc.
  • • select an appropriate design and methodology for the measurement of perceptual phenomena • apply knowledge to solving problems and evaluating ideas and information • describe and interpret data presented in graphical form • competently access, use and synthesise information
  • • display creative thinking skills • develop new ideas and theories and construct cohesive arguments • present ideas in new and creative ways • consider problems from new perspectives
  • • demonstrate effective writing skills • display effective discussion skills • express ideas with clarity and concision • communicate complex ideas simply • present information in a coherent and integrated way
  • • apply and adapt knowledge to the real world • recognise the strengths and limitations of Perception in gathering “facts” • present a convincing argument for the importance of the study of Perception • present a balanced critical view of Perception • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with infants and children • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with animals • reflect on how perception may influence your opinions or beliefs
  • • demonstrate effective time management and work organisation skills • assess your own learning against a set of pre-selected criteria • reflect on how you have analysed information and solved problems, and incorporate lessons learnt into future work

Delivery and Resources

Technology Used and Required

For this unit you will need to have access to a computer that can reliably connect to the Internet. This will be essential for completing online quizzes (see section on "Assessment Tasks"), and in accessing the unit's web-page, which can be found at:

https://ilearn.mq.edu.au

Required Text

Snowden, R., Thompson, P., & Troscianko, T. Basic vision: an introduction to visual perception 2nd Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012.

This is a very accessible text that is always popular with students. It introduces technical concepts in an easy-to-grasp fashion, and is an excellent introduction to the discipline of visual perception. It will be an indispensible resource for students on this course.

Recommended Text

Mather, G. Foundations of Sensation & Perception, 2nd Edition. East Sussex: Psychology Press, 2008.

This text offers broader coverage of perception in general, and will be especially useful for topics outside of vision, which Snowden et al. does not cover. It also offers more technical detail than Snowden et al. in certain areas, allowing the conscientious student to deepen their understanding of the topics that are covered in the required text.

 

Lecture Topics and Assigned Reading:

Session

Week

Topic

(Lecturer)

Assigned

Reading

Also

Relevant

1

Course Introduction (KB)

General Principles/Methods (KB)

Mather, Ch1

Snowden et al., Ch0, 12

2

Body Senses (KB)

Chemical Senses (KB)

Mather, Ch2

Mather, Ch3

 

3

Chemical Senses (KB)

Sound, Ear & Brain (AF)

Mather, Ch4

 

4

Auditory Perception (AF)

Mather, Ch5

 

5

Light, Eye & Brain (KB)

Snowden Ch1-2

Mather Ch6-7

6

Spatial Vision (KB)

Snowden et al., Ch3-4

Mather Ch8

7

STUDY WEEK (no lecture)

-

-

8

Visual Development (EC)

Snowden Ch8

-

9

Object Perception (KC)

Multisensory Processing (RZ)

Mather, Ch9

Mather, Ch13

-

10

Depth Perception (KB)

Snowden et al., Ch7

Mather, Ch10

11

Motion Perception (KB)

Snowden et al., Ch6

Mather, Ch11

12

Colour Vision (KB)

Snowden et al., Ch5

Mather, Ch12

13

Face Perception (KB)

Q&A on KB's lectures (KB)

Snowden et al., Ch10

 

 

Additional Reading

Additional material may be assigned from other textbooks and key papers where appropriate. Specific details will be given at the beginning of each lecture.

Access to Assigned Reading Material

Both the required and the recommended texts are available for purchase at the University Bookshop, in addition to the copies available at the library, in the main collection and on e-reserve. Where availability is limited, students should consider using the first edition of the Mather book (entitled “Foundations of Perception”), of which the library has additional copies. Although the 2nd edition features revisions in some areas, the 1st edition is just as good for most topics. Efforts have been made to put relevant chapters of Mather on e-reserve where possible (subject to copyright restrictions, etc. – see table below for dates of availability). Chapter 1 will be available at the start of the unit, and the schedule of availability on e-reserve for the rest of the semester is given below.

You should also note that at the time of writing, Mather’s Ch 6 (covering material from lectures in week 5) is available online as a free sample. It is recommended that all students download this. Go to http://www.psypress.co.uk/mather/sample.asp to download the “Sample Chapter”.

e-reserve Schedule

Title

Edition

Chapter

Relevant lecture

Available

From

To

Foundations of Sensation & Perception

2nd

1

1

28 Feb

6 Mar

Foundations of Sensation & Perception

2nd

2 & 3

2

7 Mar

13 Mar

Foundations of Sensation & Perception

2nd

4

3

14 Mar

20 Mar

Foundations of Sensation & Perception

2nd

5

4

21 Mar

27 Mar

Foundations of Sensation & Perception

2nd

7

5

28 Mar

3 Apr

Foundations of Sensation & Perception

2nd

8

6

4 Apr

10 Apr

Foundations of Sensation & Perception

2nd

9 & 13

9

9 May

 15 May

Foundations of Sensation & Perception

2nd

10

10

16 May

22 May

Foundations of Sensation & Perception

2nd

11

11

23 May

29 Jul

Foundations of Sensation & Perception

2nd

12

13

30 May

5 Jun

 

Unit Schedule

PSY247 Unit Overview

The Unit Convenor role will be filled by A/Prof Kevin Brooks for the majority of the course, excluding approximately weeks 6-9. During this period, Dr Eugene Chekaluk will serve a course convenor.

Early lectures by Kevin Brooks and Anna Fiveash will concentrate on the low-level mechanisms of perception through a variety of senses, with special attention given to the details of auditory and visual perception. In later lectures, Kevin Brooks, Eugene Chekaluk, Kim Curby and Regine Zopf will cover some higher-level issues, such as the perception of faces and objects, the issue of multisensory integration and the development of perceptual abilities.

Practicals will supplement and build upon the lecture material, allowing a hands-on approach to perceptual phenomena and their explanation. Another aim of the unit is to teach general skills. In practical classes, students will learn how to use computers/tablets and will practice oral communication. Aptitude for written communication and problem-solving skills will be refined in practicals, and demonstrated in examinations through multiple-choice questions. Web/IT skills will be used in practicals, as well as in accessing the parts of the course housed on the unit’s iLearn web page, including online assessments.

It is University policy that the University-issued email account will be used for official University communication. All students are required to access their University account frequently.

The course will comprise lectures and practicals supported by assigned reading. Although some of the material from these separate components may be related to each other, different concepts and topics will be contained in each. Students enrolled in the External Composite attendance mode (Xc1) can access the echo360 recording of the lecture, but must attend the compulsory practical classes.

The timetable for classes can be found on the University web site at: http://www.timetables.mq.edu.au/

Lectures

Weekly lectures will be held on Tuesdays from 4-6pm in X5B T1.  

Practicals

The practical program will run from university session weeks 3-6 and 9-12 inclusive, with most sessions held in room C5A 316  (except groups 2 & 14, Tues 2pm, in C5A 517). They will be conducted by experienced tutors who will be your first contact if you have problems with this unit. Their initials can be found in the schedules below, and their full contact details can be found in the "Teaching Staff" section. You will be required to attend four 2-hour practicals throughout the semester. Students will be divided into groups. The schedule and topics to be covered are displayed below. The content of the practical classes is identical for all classes. You should be aware that as practicals will include assessed activities, your attendance is essential.  

 

Practical Topics:

Session Weeks

Topic

 

3 & 4

Illusions & Aftereffects

 

5 & 6

Spatial Vision

 

9 & 10

Binocular (3D) Vision

 

11 & 12

Psychophysical Methods

 

 

Practical Class Times:

Name

Day

Start

End

Session Weeks

Room

Tutor*

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/01 

Thursday

10:00am

12:00pm

4, 6, 10, 12

C5A 316

SA

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/02 

Tuesday

2:00pm

4:00pm

4, 6, 10, 12

C5A 317

DS

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/03 

Tuesday

9:00am

11:00am

4, 6, 10, 12

C5A 316

DS

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/04 

Monday

2:00pm

4:00pm

4, 6, 10, 12

C5A 316

MFW

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/05 

Tuesday

11:00am

1:00pm

4, 6, 10, 12

C5A 316

DS

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/06 

Thursday

12:00pm

2:00pm

4, 6, 10, 12

C5A 316

SA

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/07 

Monday

10:00am

12:00pm

4, 6, 10, 12

C5A 316

MFW

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/08 

Monday

12:00pm

2:00pm

4, 6, 10, 12

C5A 316

MFW

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/09 

Wednesday

2:00pm

4:00pm

4, 6, 10, 12

C5A 316

AK

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/10 

Friday

12:00pm

2:00pm

4, 6, 10, 12

C5A 316

SA

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/11 

Wednesday

9:00am

11:00am

4, 6, 10, 12

C5A 316

AK

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/12 

Wednesday

12:00pm

2:00pm

4, 6, 10, 12

C5A 316

AK

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/13 

Thursday

10:00am

12:00pm

3, 5, 9, 11

C5A 316

SA

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/14 

Tuesday

2:00pm

4:00pm

3, 5, 9, 11

C5A 317

DS

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/15 

Tuesday

9:00am

11:00am

3, 5, 9, 11

C5A 316

DS

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/16 

Monday

2:00pm

4:00pm

3, 5, 9, 11

C5A 316

MFW

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/17 

Tuesday

11:00am

1:00pm

3, 5, 9, 11

C5A 316

DS

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/18 

Thursday

12:00pm

2:00pm

3, 5, 9, 11

C5A 316

SA

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/19 

Monday

10:00am

12:00pm

3, 5, 9, 11

C5A 316

MFW

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/20 

Monday

12:00pm

2:00pm

3, 5, 9, 11

C5A 316

MFW

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/21 

Wednesday

2:00pm

4:00pm

3, 5, 9, 11

C5A 316

AK

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/22 **

Friday

12:00pm

2:00pm

3, 5, 9, 11

C5A 316

SA

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/23 

Wednesday

9:00am

11:00am

3, 5, 9, 11

C5A 316

AK

PSY 247/S1/Day/Practical_1/24 

Wednesday

12:00pm

2:00pm

3, 5, 9, 11

C5A 316

AK

* Full names and contact details for tutors can be found in the "Staff Contacts" Section

** Tutorials "On Hold" at the time of writing.

Due to restrictions on the availability of resources in the laboratory and to health and safety regulations it is highly recommended that you attend the practical to which you have been assigned. Although students may be permitted to attend a tutorial that they were not assigned to if there happens to be ample room in the class, most classes are likely to be full. In cases of overcrowding, those not attending their assigned group will be asked to leave. Under these circumstances, no special provisions will be made for attendance at an alternative practical class.

Managing Classes: Changes to all units can be made online via eStudent. IT SHOULD BE NOTED THAT TUTORS AND LECTURERS ARE UNABLE TO HELP WITH THIS. After the designated last day to add units, no further changes will be allowed unless supporting documentation about the reason for changing is provided and there is space in the tutorial you wish to change into.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • • identify, define and demonstrate an understanding of the key terms and processes in Perception • discuss key theories and research in Perception • locate, identify and demonstrate an understanding of the function of key structures in the physiology of human sensory systems • explain the cause of many different perceptual phenomena in terms of perceptual and physiological processes and principles

Assessment tasks

  • Online Quizzes (with Feedback)
  • Practical Worksheets
  • Mid-session Test
  • Final Exam

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • • understand the difference between the “real” world (what is) and the “phenomenological” world (what seems to be) • apply perceptual and physiological principles to understanding the phenomenological world • critically evaluate designs and analyses in perceptual psychology • interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions • critically evaluate perceptual theories and arguments • review and critique literature on Perception • competently use information technology applications e.g. e-mail, web-browsers, etc.

Assessment tasks

  • Online Quizzes (with Feedback)
  • Practical Worksheets
  • Mid-session Test
  • Final Exam

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • • select an appropriate design and methodology for the measurement of perceptual phenomena • apply knowledge to solving problems and evaluating ideas and information • describe and interpret data presented in graphical form • competently access, use and synthesise information

Assessment tasks

  • Online Quizzes (with Feedback)
  • Practical Worksheets
  • Mid-session Test
  • Final Exam

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • • display creative thinking skills • develop new ideas and theories and construct cohesive arguments • present ideas in new and creative ways • consider problems from new perspectives

Assessment tasks

  • Practical Worksheets
  • Mid-session Test
  • Final Exam

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • • demonstrate effective writing skills • display effective discussion skills • express ideas with clarity and concision • communicate complex ideas simply • present information in a coherent and integrated way

Assessment tasks

  • Practical Worksheets
  • Mid-session Test
  • Final Exam

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • • apply and adapt knowledge to the real world • recognise the strengths and limitations of Perception in gathering “facts” • present a convincing argument for the importance of the study of Perception • present a balanced critical view of Perception • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with infants and children • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with animals • reflect on how perception may influence your opinions or beliefs

Assessment tasks

  • Online Quizzes (with Feedback)
  • Practical Worksheets
  • Mid-session Test
  • Final Exam

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • • demonstrate effective time management and work organisation skills • assess your own learning against a set of pre-selected criteria • reflect on how you have analysed information and solved problems, and incorporate lessons learnt into future work

Assessment tasks

  • Practical Worksheets
  • Mid-session Test
  • Final Exam

Changes from Previous Offering

Visual Development lecture (accompanied by a weekly quiz) returns, taught by Eugene Chekaluk.

Regine Zopf teaches Multisensory Processing lecture.

Teaching and Learning Strategy

 

This unit is taught through lectures and practicals with support from web-based resources such as iLearn, including the online discussion board. While lectures are useful principally for introducing new concepts and knowledge, practicals allow more direct interactions between instructor and students. They are your opportunity to enhance your understanding further by participating in activities and asking questions. The iLearn discussion board also allows students to discuss topics in greater depth, and may also feature contributions by staff members when there appears to be confusion amongst the student body. The lecture schedule set out above is a guide only, and is intended to be flexible. On occasion, more time will be spent on certain topics if additional explanation is required. As such, material from one lecture may overlap into the next, where necessary.

iLearn

Students should check the iLearn web site at regular intervals for announcements, voluntary online quizzes, lecture notes, terminology lists, examples of illusions and perceptual phenomena in picture, video and sound files and other supplementary learning materials. It will also feature a discussion board on which students may converse about course material, or any other legitimate business related to PSY247. Links to echo360, which will be available in audio and video format, will be included. It is recommended that students visit this site regularly and make full use of the facilities.

Feedback

In this course you will have several opportunities to get feedback, and to assess your progress through formative assessment activities. One of these will be through online quizzes offered on the course’s iLearn webpage. These are part of the assessments for this course, and while they are in progress feedback will not be available. However, when each quiz closes, extensive details of why each given answer was correct or incorrect are given, and the student is directed towards the appropriate textbook pages to cement his/her understanding.

What does it take to do well in PSY247?

Students are expected to pay close attention to all lectures and to take notes to aid their retention of the material covered. Although echo360 will be invaluable when attendance is physically impossible, it is recommended that students attend lectures, as there are some aspects of the course that cannot be replicated through such media. Reading assigned during each lecture should be completed close to the date of the relevant lecture. Review of the material (individually, or in group sessions) in the student’s own time will be essential to consolidate knowledge and enhance understanding. Attendance of, and active participation in practicals is also mandatory. Worksheets distributed during practicals are assessed and need to be completed and handed in during the same practical. Online quizzes offer the chance to answer questions while using resources such as textbooks and lecture notes. This open book format is unlike formal examinations, and offers an opportunity for grade enhancement that should not be missed. In addition, other learning resources will be made available, such as lists of key terminology. It should be noted that according to Senate guidelines, workloads should involve 3 hours per credit point per week. This results in 9 hours per week (including lectures and practicals) for a 3 credit point unit such as PSY247.

Note: Assessment will be based on the successful understanding of material from lectures, practicals and from the assigned reading. Please note that rote learning alone will not be a successful strategy, as the assessments will test for deeper appreciation of the course material in a variety of formats. Simply remembering the “facts” will not suffice. Students need to demonstrate their understanding of the principles, and demonstrate the ability to apply such understanding in new contexts.

What material is examinable?

Obviously, the exact details of the questions to be asked in the examinations will not be released in advance. However, questions will come from topics covered during lectures and practicals. Where additional information on these topics is supplied in the assigned reading, this should also be considered examinable. The examinations will not feature questions on topics not covered during lectures even if they are included in the assigned reading.

Statement on Academic Courtesy

It is the right of each student to learn in an environment that is free of disruption and distraction. Please make an effort to arrive to class on time, and if you are unavoidably detained, please enter the lecture theatre as quietly as possible to minimise disruption, using the back entrance if possible. Although some lecturers may allow questions during lectures, talking between students is often disruptive and is strongly discouraged. Phones, pagers, and other electronic devices that produce noise and other distractions must be turned off prior to entering class, and remain off for the duration of lectures and practicals.

Statement on Social Inclusion and Diversity

Social inclusion at Macquarie University is about giving everyone who has the potential to benefit from higher education the opportunity to study at university, participate in campus life and flourish in their chosen field. The University has made significant moves to promote an equitable, diverse and exciting campus community for the benefit of staff and students. It is your responsibility to contribute towards the development of an inclusive culture and practice in the areas of learning and teaching, research, and service orientation and delivery. As a member of the Macquarie University community, you must not discriminate against or harass others on the basis of their sex, gender, race, marital status, carers' responsibilities, disability, sexual preference, age, political conviction or religious belief. All lecturers, tutors and students are expected to display appropriate behaviour that is conducive to a healthy learning environment for everyone. The Unit Convenor is a member of the Ally Network and is happy to provide support to members of the GLBTIQ community.