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HLTH215 – Principles in Health and Disease 1

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Subramanyam Vemulpad
Contact via subramanyam.vemulpad@mq.edu.au
C5C West 351
Tuesday 10 am -12 noon
Lecturer
Suzanne Saks
Contact via suzanne.saks@mq.edu.au
Tutor
Amy Melamet
Contact via amy.melamet@mq.edu.au
Tutor
Heidi Sinclair
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
BIOL115 and (HLTH108 or BIOL108)
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit provides the students with the opportunity to explore the relationship between health and disease, from both the biological and psychosocial perspective. The diversity of stressors influencing the human body and mind is explored, and the response of the body to them is discussed. This includes adaptations at both cellular and tissue levels of organisation, inflammation, the immune response, tissue death and neoplasia. The immunisation debate and other relevant public health issues are explored. The relationship between the brain, 'mind', immune and endocrine systems is also studied. By the conclusion of this unit, students will have an understanding of the complex relationship between ourselves and our environment.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate the appropriate use of terminology, within the disciplines of pathology and microbiology.
  2. Explain the multifactorial nature of health and disease.
  3. Demonstrate a broad knowledge and understanding of medical microbiology and general pathological processes.
  4. Apply an understanding of the epidemiological aspects of disease, to issues such as immunisation, infection control and disease prevention.

General Assessment Information

The University Examination period for Second Half Year 2017 is during November and December.

You are expected to present yourself for examination at the time and place designated in the University Examination Timetable. The timetable will be available in draft form approximately eight weeks before the commencement of the examinations and in final form approximately four weeks before the commencement of the examinations. http://www.timetables.mq.edu.au/exam

The only exception to not sitting an examination at the designated time is because of documented illness or unavoidable disruption. In these circumstances you may wish to consider applying for disruption to studies. Information about the disruption to studies process is available at

http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/exams/disruption_to_studies/

In particular, pay attention to the following information on the Disruption to Studies:

The disruption to studies policy applies only to serious and unavoidable disruptions that arise after a study period has commenced.

Serious and unavoidable disruption: The University classifies a disruption as serious and unavoidable if it:

• could not have reasonably been anticipated, avoided or guarded against by the student; and

• was beyond the student's control; and

• caused substantial disruption to the student's capacity for effective study and/or completion of required work; and

• occurred during an event critical study period and was at least three (3) consecutive days duration, and/or

• prevented completion of a final examination.

Students with a pre-existing disability/health condition or prolonged adverse circumstances may be eligible for ongoing assistance and support. Such support is governed by other policies and may be sought and coordinated through Campus Wellbeing and Support Services.

Supplementary examination: If a supplementary examination is granted as a result of the Disruption to Studies process, the examination will be scheduled after the conclusion of the official examination period. (Please check the Faculty of Science and Engineering website for Supplementary exams schedule).

If you are granted a supplementary exam via the Disruption to Studies process, you will have to appear for a supplementary exam in the supplementary exam period. In this scenario, only your supplementary exam mark will count towards your final exam mark, irrespective of whether or not you attended the final exam in the normal examination period. The submission of a Disruption to Studies form should not be used as a ‘just in case’ strategy.

Supplementary exams may be in a different format to the exam set in the normal examination period e.g. oral examination.

You are advised that it is Macquarie University policy not to set early examinations for individuals or groups of students. All students are expected to ensure that they are available until the end of the teaching semester, that is, the final day of the official examination period.

Grades

Achievement of grades will be based on the following criteria:

High Distinction:  provides consistent evidence of deep and critical understanding in relation to the learning outcomes.  There is substantial originality and insight in identifying, generating and communicating competing arguments, perspectives or problem solving approaches; critical evaluation of problems, their solutions and their implications; creativity in application.

Distinction:  provides evidence of integration and evaluation of critical ideas, principles and theories, distinctive insight and ability in applying relevant skills and concepts in relation to learning outcomes. There is demonstration of frequent originality in defining and analysing issues or problems and providing solutions; and the use of means of communication appropriate to the discipline and the audience.

Credit:  provides evidence of learning that goes beyond replication of content knowledge or skills relevant to the learning outcomes.  There is demonstration of substantial understanding of fundamental concepts in the field of study and the ability to apply these concepts in a variety of contexts; plus communication of ideas fluently and clearly in terms of the conventions of the discipline.

Pass:  provides sufficient evidence of the achievement of learning outcomes.  There is demonstration of understanding and application of fundamental concepts of the field of study; and communication of information and ideas adequately in terms of the conventions of the discipline.  The learning attainment is considered satisfactory or adequate or competent or capable in relation to the specified outcomes.

Fail: does not provide evidence of attainment of all learning outcomes.

There is missing or partial or superficial or faulty understanding and application of the fundamental concepts in the field of study; and incomplete, confusing or lacking communication of ideas in ways that give little attention to the conventions of the discipline.

Sometimes it helps to ‘translate’ these descriptions into numbers. So, what is expected from you in this unit, in order for you to attain a specific grade, is outlined below: 

 

Grade

 

Fail

0-49%

Pass

50-64%

Credit

65-74%

Distinction

75-84%

High Distinction

>85%

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Quizzes 20% ongoing
Final Examination 60% No University Examination Period
Practical Quizzes and test 20% No Varied, based on prac group

Quizzes

Due: ongoing
Weighting: 20%

There will be 11 short quizzes to be completed over the semester, in weeks 2-12 inclusive. Each is to be completed during your tutorial class.  Your ten best scores will be counted.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate the appropriate use of terminology, within the disciplines of pathology and microbiology.
  • Explain the multifactorial nature of health and disease.
  • Demonstrate a broad knowledge and understanding of medical microbiology and general pathological processes.
  • Apply an understanding of the epidemiological aspects of disease, to issues such as immunisation, infection control and disease prevention.

Final Examination

Due: University Examination Period
Weighting: 60%

The final examination will cover the content of the entire semester. Questions will include multiple choice questions, true or false and short answer questions.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate the appropriate use of terminology, within the disciplines of pathology and microbiology.
  • Explain the multifactorial nature of health and disease.
  • Demonstrate a broad knowledge and understanding of medical microbiology and general pathological processes.
  • Apply an understanding of the epidemiological aspects of disease, to issues such as immunisation, infection control and disease prevention.

Practical Quizzes and test

Due: Varied, based on prac group
Weighting: 20%

Quiz 1: Take home, no marks

Quiz 2 + 3:  To be done in practical class; timed. (8 marks)

Practical Exam: On the day of your 3rd practical session; 2 Questions. (12 marks)

More details are provided in the practical manual.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate the appropriate use of terminology, within the disciplines of pathology and microbiology.
  • Explain the multifactorial nature of health and disease.
  • Demonstrate a broad knowledge and understanding of medical microbiology and general pathological processes.
  • Apply an understanding of the epidemiological aspects of disease, to issues such as immunisation, infection control and disease prevention.

Delivery and Resources

Delivery mode

1. Three x 1 hour lectures per week, weeks 1-13. Echo360 lecture recordings are available for this unit.

2. One x 1.5 hour tutorial per week, weeks 1-13.

3. Three x 3 hour practicals per student, starting from week 2

4. Five to six hours per week self-instructional learning, readings from the text and exercises on lecture topics

 

Class times and locations

Lecture times:

Three lectures of 1 hr each per week.  Venue: W5AT2 (check the online TImetables to confirm).

Wednesday     8:00 – 9.00

Thursday        8:00 – 9:00

Friday             8:00 - 9:00

 

Workshop (Practicals) start from Week 2 of Semester.

Class_01 Friday 9.00 – 12.00 in E8A 150

Class_02 Friday 13:00 – 16.00 in E8A 150

Any changes made by students to their tutorial and practical class enrolment online after 20 July will not be considered. Based on enrolments as at 9 am on 21 July, students will be allocated to practical groups by 24 Jul and the list will be put up on iLecture.  If your ID does not appear in the list, contact the unit convenor immediately. Due to restrictions on class sizes, if you are unable to enrol in a particular class, you have to organise a swap with another student and inform the Unit convenor.

Each student is required to attend only 3 practical sessions, on consecutive weeks, as per schedule below. A student allocated to one group cannot turn up for practicals meant for another group without prior written approval (email) from the unit convenor. 

Practicals start in Week 2 (Lab: E8A 150)

Prac Group

Practical 1

Practical 2

Practical 3

Day & Time

A

11 Aug

18 Aug

25 Aug

Fri 9-12

B

11 Aug 18 Aug 25 Aug

Fri 1-4

C

1 Sep

8 Sep

15 Sep

Fri 9-12

D

1 Sep

8 Sep

15 Sep

Fri 1-4

E

6 Oct

13 Oct

20 Oct

Fri 9-12

Tutorials start in Week 1

Class

Day

Start

End

Room

1

Thursday

9:00

10:30

W5C309

2

Thursday

10:30

12:00

W5C211

3

Thursday

9:00

10:30

W5C211

4

Thursday

10:30

12:00

W5C309

5

Thursday

12:00

13:30

W5C221

6

Thursday

13:30

15:00

W5C221

Attendance: Participation in practicals and tutorials is compulsory. Attendance at lectures is strongly recommended.

Required and recommended resources

Required texts

  1. HLTH215 Tutorial workbook (available on iLearn only; to be printed by students)

    and

  2. *Understanding Pathophysiology by Judy Craft, Christopher Gordon & Adriana Tiziani; Mosby 2 Ed. 2014;ISBN 9780729541602

    OR

    K L McCance & S E Heuther. Pathophysiology. The Biological Basis for Disease in Adults and Children. Mosby. 7th Edition, 2015  ISBN: 9780323088541.

    *Craft will also be the core text required for HLTH316 and HLTH317.

Recommended reading

  1. A medical dictionary (This will be useful for all health science units)

  2. D. Anderson et al. 2015. Nester’s Microbiology a Human Perspective. 8th Edition. McGraw-Hill, USA. ISBN: 9780073522593.

  3. R. Goering et al.Mims’ Medical Microbiology. Elsevier.5 Ed. eBook ISBN: 9780702050299

Useful web-links:

http://www-medlib.med.utah.edu/WebPath/   This site is the source of many of the pathology images found on the web site.

Communicable Diseases Australia

Centre for Diseases Control, USA

Immunisation Resources

Voice against Immunisations

World Health Organisation Infectious Diseases

Unit web page

The URL of the HLTH215 iLearn site is: http://ilearn.mq.edu.au/

You will be asked for a username and password. For any IT help, contact OneHelp

Unit Schedule

Week

Lecture 1 (Wed 8-9)

 

Lecture 2 (Thurs 8-9) 

Lecture 3 (Fri 8-9)

1

Intro to unit 1:

Overview

Intro to unit 2:

Concepts of Health, Disease and Illness, Terminology

 

Intro to unit 3:

The study of Pathology

and Microbiology

Microscopy, Staining

2

Cell Structure -

Prokaryotes versus Eukaryotes

 

Stressors and cell injury 1

Stressors and cell injury 2

3

 

Micro-organisms 1: Biology of medically important bacteria

 

Micro-organisms 2: Biology of medically important bacteria

Micro-organisms 3: Biology of medically important viruses

4

Micro-organisms 4: Biology of medically important viruses

Micro-organisms 5: Other medically important microbes: algae, fungi etc

Micro-organisms 6: Controlling the growth of micro-organisms

 

5

Host defence mechanisms – non-specific defences

 

Host defence mechanisms – non-specific defences

The Inflammatory response 1

6

The Inflammatory response 2

An introduction to tissue repair

 

Specific defence mechanisms

Applied Immunology, Immunological disorders

7

Immunological disorders

 

Immunological disorders

Revision

8

Issues concerning Immunisation

The Host versus the Micro-organism 1:

Interaction between the Micro-organisms and the Host

 

 The Host versus the Micro-organism 2:

Interaction between the Micro-organisms and the Host

9

Haemodynamic disturbances 1:  Oedema, Disturbances to haemostasis

 

Haemodynamic disturbances 2: Arteriosclerosis

Haemodynamic disturbances 3: Thrombosis, Embolism, Infarction

10

Haemodynamic disturbances 4: Alterations in blood pressure,  Aneurysms, Shock

 

Neoplasia

Neoplasia

11

Biotechnology and its Applications in Medical Microbiology

 

 

Principles of Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases & Infection Control

 

Principles of Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases & Infection Control

12

The role of the mind/emotions in illness and disease.

Stress

 

Concepts of psychoneuroimmunology

Mental illness

13

Revision

 

Revision

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate the appropriate use of terminology, within the disciplines of pathology and microbiology.
  • Explain the multifactorial nature of health and disease.
  • Demonstrate a broad knowledge and understanding of medical microbiology and general pathological processes.
  • Apply an understanding of the epidemiological aspects of disease, to issues such as immunisation, infection control and disease prevention.

Assessment tasks

  • Quizzes
  • Final Examination
  • Practical Quizzes and test

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Explain the multifactorial nature of health and disease.
  • Demonstrate a broad knowledge and understanding of medical microbiology and general pathological processes.
  • Apply an understanding of the epidemiological aspects of disease, to issues such as immunisation, infection control and disease prevention.

Assessment tasks

  • Quizzes
  • Final Examination
  • Practical Quizzes and test

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate the appropriate use of terminology, within the disciplines of pathology and microbiology.
  • Explain the multifactorial nature of health and disease.
  • Demonstrate a broad knowledge and understanding of medical microbiology and general pathological processes.
  • Apply an understanding of the epidemiological aspects of disease, to issues such as immunisation, infection control and disease prevention.

Assessment tasks

  • Quizzes
  • Final Examination
  • Practical Quizzes and test

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Apply an understanding of the epidemiological aspects of disease, to issues such as immunisation, infection control and disease prevention.

Assessment tasks

  • Quizzes
  • Final Examination
  • Practical Quizzes and test

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Explain the multifactorial nature of health and disease.
  • Demonstrate a broad knowledge and understanding of medical microbiology and general pathological processes.
  • Apply an understanding of the epidemiological aspects of disease, to issues such as immunisation, infection control and disease prevention.

Assessment tasks

  • Quizzes
  • Final Examination
  • Practical Quizzes and test

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Apply an understanding of the epidemiological aspects of disease, to issues such as immunisation, infection control and disease prevention.

Assessment tasks

  • Quizzes
  • Final Examination
  • Practical Quizzes and test

Changes from Previous Offering

Final exam used to be a hurdle in previous years. The Final exam is not a hurdle for this unit anymore.

Changes since First Published

Date Description
26/07/2017 1) Added one Tutor (Heidi Sinclair) 2) Corrected the Workshop (Practicals) start from Week 1 to Week 2.