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SOC 311 – Social Order and Social Control

2017 – S1 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Peter Rogers
Contact via peter.rogers@mq.edu.au
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
39cp at 100 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
In this unit we explore criminology through the concepts of social order and social control. You will consider how theories of order, control, justice and freedom emerge from social and cultural contexts, historical events, in theories and as ideology to better understand how we are ruled in different ways at different times. The evolution of our freedoms will be explored throughout the unit to encourage critical reflection on fairness, discipline, order and control in Australian and international contexts. This unit asks student to test their ideas and ideals to see if, in the final analysis, the freedom and liberty we think we have is 'real' freedom or just an illusion and a trap to keep us all under control

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. To develop a greater understanding of the key concepts and theoretical approaches central to the sociology of crime and criminology, particularly in relation to social order and social control.
  2. To develop enhanced critical awareness of how rules, beliefs and values are socially constructed as institutions and organisations of social order in different ways at different time periods.
  3. To plan, design and conduct an independent research project, using the library and online sources efficiently for the generation of content and critical argument
  4. To critically evaluate and justify both group and individual performance (in tutorial participation and group work - both in tutorials and using the online tools, e.g. group wiki).
  5. To function as a part of a team to design, develop and deliver a piece of work in collaboration with others.
  6. To apply theoretical knowledge and both qualitative and quantitative data sources to issues relating to social order, social control, crime, criminality, freedom and tyranny.
  7. To enhance verbal and written communication skills, such as: offering a clearly reasoned argument with a logical structure; take part in and reflect upon discussion and debate with an open mind; to generate information for diverse audiences or user groups through a range of media;
  8. To enhance the ability to describe, analyse, synthesise and reflect upon information from critical theory across disciplines as well as diverse data sources

General Assessment Information

MAJOR ESSAY (further information for students)

The essay will be chosen from one of the set questions used in this unit. These questions will be posted online (in iLearn) and on the office door of the unit convenor (W6A, Room 838).

Academic support on essay writing can be found at the MQ library website, undergraduate page.

The essay should address the key themes of the course drawing on varied sources, including; the listed material, recommended readings; further reading.

IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER

  1. The essay must be your own work. Harsh penalties are imposed for plagiarism, ghost writing or other 'cheating' as per the academic honesty policy
  2. The essay MUST show evidence of BOTH an understanding of core unit content AND substantial wider reading on the appropriate topic
  3. Marks will be deducted or allocated for proper referencing following standard HARVARD (author-date) referencing style in the in-text content, citations and references used throughout the final submission.

ANOTHER IMPORTANT NOTE...THE ESSAY MUST BE WRITTEN ON A DIFFERENT TOPIC TO THAT OF THE GROUP PRESENTATION. If in doubt ask your tutor for advice on your topics.

 

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GROUP PROJECT (further information)

The group project is assessed in 3 parts:

  1. GROUP PROPOSAL (10% of GROUP PROJECT final mark)
  2. GROUP WIKI (50% of GROUP PROJECT final mark)
  3. GROUP PRESENTATION (40% of GROUP PROJECT final mark)

The groups will be allocated in week 3. 

 

1. GROUP PROPOSAL

The group proposal is a collaborative effort. Students will work together to generate ONE group proposal. This is to be uploaded to the group wiki by the deadline. 

This is a group assessment requiring students to meet a predetermined set of objectives within a tight time frame. After groups are allocated in week 3 students will have 1 week to decide on a topic and prepare an plan. This is designed as a diagnostic assessment to identify any groups that may have difficulties early in the session, and to ensure that groups and group members understand the expected level of cooperation required to complete the related assessment tasks. 

CHECK LIST:

The proposal must contain:

  1. Contact details (minimum phone/email) for all group members
  2. Record/minutes of first meeting (following provided template)
  3. A timeline and/or initial task list for the project
  4. A group project Gantt chart (an example of a Gantt will be shown to the groups in the first tutorial)

KEY POINTS TO REMEMBER:

- Students must have agreed upon a topic for the presentation, clearly communicate this topic to the tutor and clearly note the title and topic of the project in the final proposal.

- Students should have agreed upon a weekly time and place for meeting outside of tutorials.

- Many groups will have both Internal AND External students in them. IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF STUDENTS (not the unit convenor) TO ARRANGE A LINK UP BETWEEN INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL GROUP MEMBERS. NOTE - if you fail to do so you fail the task.

IMPORTANT NOTE:

YOU ARE REQUIRED to use the WIKI (which will be accessible from week 3), to liaise on group matters, ALL GROUP COMMUNICATION MUST BE DOCUMENTED IN THE WIKI. ANY use of alternative social media (e.g. facebook etc.) cannot be monitored and you will not gain marks for this. If you are using skype to meet with external members document this and document your conversations in the wiki (e.g. providing minutes of the discussions). 

 

2. GROUP WIKI

The assessment policy requires that 50% of all group projects be assessed on the basis on an individual students contribution. In this group project that is acheived by monitoring the contributions each student makes to the group project wiki.

The wiki provides a record of each individual students contribution throughout term. ONLY contributions documented in the wiki are assessable so it is vital that students learn to use the wiki and document all aspects of their work in this virtual learning space. Students are expected to discuss and dovide up the work in an equitable fashion, rotating key jobs to ensure all students arte able to contribute and meeting the internal deadlines set by the group. Students are REQUIRED to post to the wiki multiple times each and every week to generate a reasonable contribution throughout term.

The wiki should include at the very minimum:

  • A diary of meetings and who attended those meetings
  • A record of how the group made its decisions
  • A record of the workload allocation (who did what?)
  • A record of internal group deadlines and whether they were met (did they do it on time?)
  • An updated Gantt chart used throughout term to monitor group performance
  • Reflections on progress - Who/how were each parts of the topic researched
  • Peer-assessed reflections on completed components of the project - Who/how were the final presentation visuals developed and arranged.

The primary role of this aspect of the work is to ensure that there is a record of the collaboration.

A group project is not just about learning the subject it is about graduate capabilities. The capabilities we are looking for in this exercise are team work, burden sharing, ability to both give and take direction, ability to demonstrate personal responsbility to yourself and to other team members. These are vital skills for moving into employement that we can draw out of this material, but also out of the exercise and experience of being together as a group of individuals who can collaborate as a team.

The group wiki allows academic staff to review the contributions of each group member, giving an overview of how you came together to develop the final presentation. It also shows when students are not 'pulling their weight' and provides a quality check to ensure that all students contribute. The purpose of this assessment is to develop team-working skills and the ability of the individual to contribute to a group project.

REMEMBER

1) All individuals are required to contribute but the wiki can be developed in different ways - play to your strengths BUT YOU MUST DECIDE THINGS AS A TEAM. For example, if a member of the group is particularly shy or struggles with public speaking they do not HAVE to be a part of the final presentation team (though they must be present during the presentation). As long as there is a record of the division of labour, backed up by the individual reports, this will be taken into account in the allocation of the PASS/FAIL mark for the presentation.

2) It is important that the wiki reflects individual contributions, but this is a group project so you must bear that in mind when contributing. Spamming the wiki does not yield good marks, so think before you post and talk to your colleagues.

3) You must keep a record of work, as such it is a good idea to keep minutes or notes from ALL group meetings (even if they happen in the pub) so that you can write up an accurate diary.

4) Groups are expected to work as a team! If there are problems with workload or lax teamwork by a member of the group then the group as a team should attempt, initially, to contact the absentee and see if they can resolve the issue - this may be a scheduling problem or a simple communication problem.

5) Make sure you ALL have the contact details for all members of your group (email and phone numbers). If contact is not possible then the problem must be brought to the attention of the course leader EARLY ENOUGH so these matters can be dealt with appropriately.

6) This should take into account both WORKSHOP time in tutorials AS WELL AS meetings that take place outside of class. Students are expected to meet at least once a week as a group. The more detail you include the better, but make sure it is relevant.

 

GROUP PRESENTATION

A group presentation of no more than 15 minutes duration will be presented in the final week of term. The topic will have been decided early in term (see Group Proposal) and the culmination of the group work (see Group Wiki) is this final presentation. A template for power-point presentation will be provided and workshop time made available throughout term to assist in the project development.

Students are given some licence to pick their own presentation topic (within reason) aligned with major theories or themes in the unit. They must then collaborate over the session to plan, research, develop and deliver the presentation on that chosen topic at the end of the session in WEEK 13.

More information on this component of the assessment will be made available in the lectures and tutorials. Further guidance on the process and final delivery are also available in the iLearn webpage for this unit.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Major Essay 50% 5th June
Group Project 50% 9th June

Major Essay

Due: 5th June
Weighting: 50%

The Major Essay (of no more than 2000 words) will test students on their ability to synthesise complex theories and apply them to a set question - see further information below


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • To develop a greater understanding of the key concepts and theoretical approaches central to the sociology of crime and criminology, particularly in relation to social order and social control.
  • To develop enhanced critical awareness of how rules, beliefs and values are socially constructed as institutions and organisations of social order in different ways at different time periods.
  • To plan, design and conduct an independent research project, using the library and online sources efficiently for the generation of content and critical argument
  • To apply theoretical knowledge and both qualitative and quantitative data sources to issues relating to social order, social control, crime, criminality, freedom and tyranny.
  • To enhance verbal and written communication skills, such as: offering a clearly reasoned argument with a logical structure; take part in and reflect upon discussion and debate with an open mind; to generate information for diverse audiences or user groups through a range of media;
  • To enhance the ability to describe, analyse, synthesise and reflect upon information from critical theory across disciplines as well as diverse data sources

Group Project

Due: 9th June
Weighting: 50%

The group project is a three part assessment in which students will collaborate to deliver a presentation, developing a range of team building and problem-solving skills - see further information below


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • To develop a greater understanding of the key concepts and theoretical approaches central to the sociology of crime and criminology, particularly in relation to social order and social control.
  • To develop enhanced critical awareness of how rules, beliefs and values are socially constructed as institutions and organisations of social order in different ways at different time periods.
  • To plan, design and conduct an independent research project, using the library and online sources efficiently for the generation of content and critical argument
  • To critically evaluate and justify both group and individual performance (in tutorial participation and group work - both in tutorials and using the online tools, e.g. group wiki).
  • To function as a part of a team to design, develop and deliver a piece of work in collaboration with others.
  • To enhance verbal and written communication skills, such as: offering a clearly reasoned argument with a logical structure; take part in and reflect upon discussion and debate with an open mind; to generate information for diverse audiences or user groups through a range of media;

Delivery and Resources

Teaching

Lectures are recorded and externally enrolled students are required to enroll in the external lecture.

FOR ALL TIMETABLE INFORMATION go to the MQ timetable website.

Rooms may change so check regularly for updates.

Required and recommended resources

IMPORTANT NOTE **Indicated Items should be held in the reserve section of the Macquarie Library ## Indicated Items are available through online resources and electronic journals

Essential texts.

A core text book for this unit is:

  • White, R. & Haines, F. (1996) Crime and Criminology, Oxford: Oxford University Press**

Further details of relevant readings will be uploaded into the iLearn space and is accessible after registration in the unit. NOTE this is a useful book but it is not the only source you need to be familiar with. You will need to search and find relevant sources out from recommended readings and online sources, so be familiar with the library.

You will also find these texts to be very useful throughout the session, though they are challenging to read we use a lot of concepts from them in this unit:

  • North, D. C., Wallis, J. J., & Weingast, B. R. (2009). Violence and social order: A conceptual framework for interpreting recorded human history. Cambridge: New York.
  • Foucault, M., Senellart, M., Ewald, F., & Fontana, A. (Eds.). (2009). Security, Territory, Population: Lectures at the College de France 1977--1978 (Vol. 4). Macmillan: London.
  • Berlin, I. (2013). The crooked timber of humanity. Random House: London

Limited supplies of these books are in the co-op bookshop.

Limited supplies of these texts are available in library, some may be available on ebook and e-reserve, check in regularly for updates. If you cannot afford to or don't want to buy copies then I recommend using those available in the library reserve collection from which you can photocopy required weekly readings. 

It is YOUR responsibility to make sure you have access to copies of the weekly readings. Learning to use the library efficiently should be in the skill set of every 3rd year student, if not you will be learning to do so in this unit.

We have made every effort over the last year to update the books related to Criminology and Crime in the MQ library, a thorough search will yield more up-to-date references and you are actively encouraged to develop your use of the library catalogue whilst studying in this unit.

Reading is mandatory and contribution to discussions in the seminars & online is an assessed part of the course so make sure you are well read and prepared to discuss the subject.

 

Unit Schedule

More in depth information on the weekly topics, readings and other related materials from the unit schedule will be made available through ilearn upon registration in this unit. This gives you a taster of the topics by the title of the weekly lectures.

WEEK 1 Introduction to the Unit. Social ORDER and Social CONTROL
WEEK 2 From Violence and History to Contracts and Cooperation
WEEK 3 The Origins of Modern Law and Order
WEEK 4 Hearts and Minds
WEEK 5 Taking the Strain
WEEK 6 Whats in a Name
WEEK 7 This STATE We're In
WEEK 8 Lies, Lies & Politics
WEEK 9 Being Critical
WEEK 10 We Will Force You To Be Free
WEEK 11 The Lonely Robot
WEEK 12 What Happened to Our Dream of Freedom
WEEK 13 GROUP PRESENTATION SESSIONS

Learning and Teaching Activities

Lectures

Weekly lectures on discipline specific content

External student wiki

Weekly activities on content, workshops on assessments and skill development

GROUP WIKI

Essential space for the group assessments. Student participation will also be monitored through the wiki

Online Discussion

Accessing group spces online and general discussion boards to particpate in critical debate

Announcements

Access convenor announcements for up-to-date information

iLearn

Access Ilearn and echo360 to download and review lecture slides, content and relevant information

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • To develop a greater understanding of the key concepts and theoretical approaches central to the sociology of crime and criminology, particularly in relation to social order and social control.
  • To develop enhanced critical awareness of how rules, beliefs and values are socially constructed as institutions and organisations of social order in different ways at different time periods.
  • To critically evaluate and justify both group and individual performance (in tutorial participation and group work - both in tutorials and using the online tools, e.g. group wiki).
  • To apply theoretical knowledge and both qualitative and quantitative data sources to issues relating to social order, social control, crime, criminality, freedom and tyranny.
  • To enhance verbal and written communication skills, such as: offering a clearly reasoned argument with a logical structure; take part in and reflect upon discussion and debate with an open mind; to generate information for diverse audiences or user groups through a range of media;
  • To enhance the ability to describe, analyse, synthesise and reflect upon information from critical theory across disciplines as well as diverse data sources

Assessment task

  • Major Essay

Learning and teaching activity

  • Weekly lectures on discipline specific content
  • Weekly activities on content, workshops on assessments and skill development

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • To develop enhanced critical awareness of how rules, beliefs and values are socially constructed as institutions and organisations of social order in different ways at different time periods.
  • To plan, design and conduct an independent research project, using the library and online sources efficiently for the generation of content and critical argument
  • To critically evaluate and justify both group and individual performance (in tutorial participation and group work - both in tutorials and using the online tools, e.g. group wiki).
  • To function as a part of a team to design, develop and deliver a piece of work in collaboration with others.
  • To apply theoretical knowledge and both qualitative and quantitative data sources to issues relating to social order, social control, crime, criminality, freedom and tyranny.

Learning and teaching activities

  • Weekly activities on content, workshops on assessments and skill development
  • Essential space for the group assessments. Student participation will also be monitored through the wiki

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • To develop enhanced critical awareness of how rules, beliefs and values are socially constructed as institutions and organisations of social order in different ways at different time periods.
  • To apply theoretical knowledge and both qualitative and quantitative data sources to issues relating to social order, social control, crime, criminality, freedom and tyranny.
  • To enhance the ability to describe, analyse, synthesise and reflect upon information from critical theory across disciplines as well as diverse data sources

Learning and teaching activities

  • Weekly activities on content, workshops on assessments and skill development

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • To develop a greater understanding of the key concepts and theoretical approaches central to the sociology of crime and criminology, particularly in relation to social order and social control.
  • To develop enhanced critical awareness of how rules, beliefs and values are socially constructed as institutions and organisations of social order in different ways at different time periods.
  • To plan, design and conduct an independent research project, using the library and online sources efficiently for the generation of content and critical argument
  • To apply theoretical knowledge and both qualitative and quantitative data sources to issues relating to social order, social control, crime, criminality, freedom and tyranny.
  • To enhance verbal and written communication skills, such as: offering a clearly reasoned argument with a logical structure; take part in and reflect upon discussion and debate with an open mind; to generate information for diverse audiences or user groups through a range of media;

Assessment tasks

  • Major Essay
  • Group Project

Learning and teaching activities

  • Weekly lectures on discipline specific content
  • Weekly activities on content, workshops on assessments and skill development
  • Access Ilearn and echo360 to download and review lecture slides, content and relevant information

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • To develop a greater understanding of the key concepts and theoretical approaches central to the sociology of crime and criminology, particularly in relation to social order and social control.
  • To plan, design and conduct an independent research project, using the library and online sources efficiently for the generation of content and critical argument
  • To critically evaluate and justify both group and individual performance (in tutorial participation and group work - both in tutorials and using the online tools, e.g. group wiki).
  • To function as a part of a team to design, develop and deliver a piece of work in collaboration with others.

Assessment tasks

  • Major Essay
  • Group Project

Learning and teaching activities

  • Weekly activities on content, workshops on assessments and skill development
  • Essential space for the group assessments. Student participation will also be monitored through the wiki
  • Access Ilearn and echo360 to download and review lecture slides, content and relevant information

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • To develop a greater understanding of the key concepts and theoretical approaches central to the sociology of crime and criminology, particularly in relation to social order and social control.
  • To develop enhanced critical awareness of how rules, beliefs and values are socially constructed as institutions and organisations of social order in different ways at different time periods.
  • To plan, design and conduct an independent research project, using the library and online sources efficiently for the generation of content and critical argument
  • To critically evaluate and justify both group and individual performance (in tutorial participation and group work - both in tutorials and using the online tools, e.g. group wiki).
  • To function as a part of a team to design, develop and deliver a piece of work in collaboration with others.
  • To apply theoretical knowledge and both qualitative and quantitative data sources to issues relating to social order, social control, crime, criminality, freedom and tyranny.
  • To enhance verbal and written communication skills, such as: offering a clearly reasoned argument with a logical structure; take part in and reflect upon discussion and debate with an open mind; to generate information for diverse audiences or user groups through a range of media;

Assessment tasks

  • Major Essay
  • Group Project

Learning and teaching activities

  • Weekly lectures on discipline specific content
  • Weekly activities on content, workshops on assessments and skill development
  • Accessing group spces online and general discussion boards to particpate in critical debate
  • Access convenor announcements for up-to-date information
  • Access Ilearn and echo360 to download and review lecture slides, content and relevant information

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • To develop a greater understanding of the key concepts and theoretical approaches central to the sociology of crime and criminology, particularly in relation to social order and social control.
  • To develop enhanced critical awareness of how rules, beliefs and values are socially constructed as institutions and organisations of social order in different ways at different time periods.
  • To function as a part of a team to design, develop and deliver a piece of work in collaboration with others.
  • To apply theoretical knowledge and both qualitative and quantitative data sources to issues relating to social order, social control, crime, criminality, freedom and tyranny.
  • To enhance the ability to describe, analyse, synthesise and reflect upon information from critical theory across disciplines as well as diverse data sources

Learning and teaching activities

  • Weekly activities on content, workshops on assessments and skill development
  • Essential space for the group assessments. Student participation will also be monitored through the wiki
  • Accessing group spces online and general discussion boards to particpate in critical debate

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • To plan, design and conduct an independent research project, using the library and online sources efficiently for the generation of content and critical argument
  • To critically evaluate and justify both group and individual performance (in tutorial participation and group work - both in tutorials and using the online tools, e.g. group wiki).
  • To function as a part of a team to design, develop and deliver a piece of work in collaboration with others.
  • To apply theoretical knowledge and both qualitative and quantitative data sources to issues relating to social order, social control, crime, criminality, freedom and tyranny.
  • To enhance verbal and written communication skills, such as: offering a clearly reasoned argument with a logical structure; take part in and reflect upon discussion and debate with an open mind; to generate information for diverse audiences or user groups through a range of media;
  • To enhance the ability to describe, analyse, synthesise and reflect upon information from critical theory across disciplines as well as diverse data sources

Assessment task

  • Group Project

Learning and teaching activity

  • Weekly lectures on discipline specific content
  • Weekly activities on content, workshops on assessments and skill development
  • Access convenor announcements for up-to-date information

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • To develop a greater understanding of the key concepts and theoretical approaches central to the sociology of crime and criminology, particularly in relation to social order and social control.
  • To plan, design and conduct an independent research project, using the library and online sources efficiently for the generation of content and critical argument
  • To function as a part of a team to design, develop and deliver a piece of work in collaboration with others.
  • To enhance verbal and written communication skills, such as: offering a clearly reasoned argument with a logical structure; take part in and reflect upon discussion and debate with an open mind; to generate information for diverse audiences or user groups through a range of media;
  • To enhance the ability to describe, analyse, synthesise and reflect upon information from critical theory across disciplines as well as diverse data sources

Assessment task

  • Group Project

Learning and teaching activity

  • Weekly lectures on discipline specific content
  • Weekly activities on content, workshops on assessments and skill development
  • Essential space for the group assessments. Student participation will also be monitored through the wiki
  • Accessing group spces online and general discussion boards to particpate in critical debate
  • Access Ilearn and echo360 to download and review lecture slides, content and relevant information

Changes from Previous Offering

The GROUP PROJECT assessment has been streamlined into one assessment with 3 sections.

This allows for (1) online submission of all components (2) the group proposal to be offered as a group assessment and not assessed individually, (3) the group wiki can now also replace the individual record allowing for a more controlled and monitorable means of assessment for the individual contributions of students to the group project, this removes the need for a further written assessment, ensures 50% of the group project mark is assessed individually and aligns the unit with the updated assessment policy for 2017.

Other values of assessment have also been adjusted to balance the distribution of work and grades across all assessment tasks.

The active participation assessment has been removed but activities for external students are still part of the unit, now they are not graded but function as learning aids for students to demonstrate a continuous commitment to learning.