Logo Students

MHIS114 – The World Since 1945: An Australian Perspective

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

Pdf icon Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff OUA coordinator
Matthew Bailey
Course Convenor
Tanya Evans
TBC - email
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit is a survey of the chief world developments influencing Australian history from 1945 to the present. Principle interest will focus on: a) Europe from post-war crisis and decline to present day resurgence, with themes of particular interest to Australia including migration, ideological trends, economic integration and decolonisation; b) the United States of America in its period of peak world power, with special attention to the politics and economics of the Cold War era and to the spread of American cultural values; c) East Asia (principally China and Japan) from post-war settlement to economic transformation with special reference to trade ties and accompanying Australian cultural adjustments. This unit will be of great benefit to students and teachers of Australian history and politics, as well as anyone wishing to understand Australia’s current relationship with the wider world. Assessment focuses on the development of one essay constructed through a step-by-step process.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe key episodes in world history since 1945, including the role of the United States, Europe and East Asia, and the major events of the Cold War and post-Cold War period.
  2. Characterise the concept of the Australian nation in its global context, emphasising the interconnectedness of Australian history.
  3. Explain the way that global ideas are changed by exposure to local culture and political conditions when they are adopted by Australians.
  4. Identify relevant scholarly material using various ethical historical research methods to create an original argument.
  5. Evaluate historical information understanding that this knowledge is constructed within contemporary political agendas and social debates.
  6. Critique opinions about the past, supported by scholarly evidence and verified through debate with peers in classroom/online discussion.
  7. Assemble and synthesise historical information to form an evidence-based argument in clear scholarly written format

General Assessment Information

Essay topics to choose from :

 

1. How did the Cold War shape Australian political culture in the 1950s?

2. What is the difference between Australian public representations of ‘displaced people’ before 1960 and ‘boat people’ after 1975?

3. How do you account for the similarities between Australian and American ideas about domesticity in the immediate post-war period?

4. What role did the "international counterculture" play in Australian activism in the 'long 1960s'?

5. What is the difference between Civil Rights and Land Rights in Australia between 1960 and 1980?

6. What did ‘economic rationalism’ do to the Australian Labor Party?

7. What did the Australian response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic show about the limits of the 'test and contain' method used elsewhere?

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Weekly discussion and quiz 20% Ongoing
Secondary Source Exercise 20% Friday 11th August
Primary Source Analysis 20% Friday 8th September
Research Essay 40% Friday 3 November

Weekly discussion and quiz

Due: Ongoing
Weighting: 20%

Each week in class you will be asked two questions about that week's reading and lecture That means that you must prepare both before the weekly seminar.There will be ten quizzes in total, and no quiz for the reading week, or for the essay writing workshop. Each quiz is thus worth 2% of your final grade. You must get both questions right to earn the marks for that week's tutorial. On-campus students must attend a class to complete the quiz. External students will have a week to complete the quiz online.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Describe key episodes in world history since 1945, including the role of the United States, Europe and East Asia, and the major events of the Cold War and post-Cold War period.
  • Characterise the concept of the Australian nation in its global context, emphasising the interconnectedness of Australian history.
  • Identify relevant scholarly material using various ethical historical research methods to create an original argument.
  • Evaluate historical information understanding that this knowledge is constructed within contemporary political agendas and social debates.
  • Critique opinions about the past, supported by scholarly evidence and verified through debate with peers in classroom/online discussion.
  • Assemble and synthesise historical information to form an evidence-based argument in clear scholarly written format

Secondary Source Exercise

Due: Friday 11th August
Weighting: 20%

This exercise consists of five short answer comprehension questions on two set readings. You will complete it after the week one discussions, and hand it in (electronically through turnitin) on the Friday of week two. The aim of this exercise is to produce a synthesis of two historical articles. A detailed description of the task, including the short answer questions, is available on iLearn.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain the way that global ideas are changed by exposure to local culture and political conditions when they are adopted by Australians.
  • Identify relevant scholarly material using various ethical historical research methods to create an original argument.
  • Evaluate historical information understanding that this knowledge is constructed within contemporary political agendas and social debates.
  • Critique opinions about the past, supported by scholarly evidence and verified through debate with peers in classroom/online discussion.
  • Assemble and synthesise historical information to form an evidence-based argument in clear scholarly written format

Primary Source Analysis

Due: Friday 8th September
Weighting: 20%

This exercise consists of four short answer comprehension questions on two set primary sources. You will hand it in (electronically through turnitin) on the Friday of week six. The aim of this exercise is to analyse two primary sources in light of the two secondary sources you sythesised in the first asessment task. A detailed description of the task, including the short answer questions, is available on iLearn.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain the way that global ideas are changed by exposure to local culture and political conditions when they are adopted by Australians.
  • Identify relevant scholarly material using various ethical historical research methods to create an original argument.
  • Evaluate historical information understanding that this knowledge is constructed within contemporary political agendas and social debates.
  • Critique opinions about the past, supported by scholarly evidence and verified through debate with peers in classroom/online discussion.
  • Assemble and synthesise historical information to form an evidence-based argument in clear scholarly written format

Research Essay

Due: Friday 3 November
Weighting: 40%

The major assessment task for this unit is a 2000-word essay. You will build on the work from the previous three assessment tasks to write an essay in response to your set question. You are expected to do research beyond the set texts for this question. It is due the Friday of Week 12. You will submit it electronically through Turnitin.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Describe key episodes in world history since 1945, including the role of the United States, Europe and East Asia, and the major events of the Cold War and post-Cold War period.
  • Characterise the concept of the Australian nation in its global context, emphasising the interconnectedness of Australian history.
  • Explain the way that global ideas are changed by exposure to local culture and political conditions when they are adopted by Australians.
  • Identify relevant scholarly material using various ethical historical research methods to create an original argument.
  • Evaluate historical information understanding that this knowledge is constructed within contemporary political agendas and social debates.
  • Critique opinions about the past, supported by scholarly evidence and verified through debate with peers in classroom/online discussion.
  • Assemble and synthesise historical information to form an evidence-based argument in clear scholarly written format

Delivery and Resources

This unit will be taught as a flipped unit.. All lecture content will be provided online and internal students will attend a 1/12-2 hour seminar. All students will need to have watched/listened to lectures before coming to class. All students will need a high speed internet connection to watch video lectures, listen to audio presentations and to participate in online learning exercises. At the end of face-to-face tutorials, internal students will be required to reflect on their learning in their OU blogs. External students will do this online. OU blogs will be accessible via the unit's I learn pages. Students can use laptops or mobile devices to record these reflections at the end of class each week.

External students will contribute to seminar discussions online.

 

Unit Schedule

Date

Global theme:

Australian experience explored:

Your contribution:

Week ONE

Legacies of War & Empire: Post war ‘reconstruction’?

Australia in the Post War World: A new world for sure?

Prepare, then Answer two in class quiz questions,

one on lecture,  one on  seminar reading then

Reflect upon your learning on ilearn

Week TWO

The First Cold War: new enemies discovered?

 

Australian Anticommunism

Likewise+ Submit Secondary Assessment

Exercise due Friday via turnitin

Week THREE

Research Methods

 

Complete Research Skills Peer Review research

Week FOUR

Atomic Domesticity: the cold war kitchen?

 

Australians at home in the 1950s

Prepare,  then Answer two in class  quiz questions,

one on lecture, one on  seminar reading

Reflect upon your learning on ilearn

Week FIVE

Decolonisation in Asia: nationalism and communism.

 

Australia Looking Towards Asia in the 50s

Prepare,  then Answer two in class  quiz questions,

one on lecture,  one on  seminar reading

 Reflect upon your learning on ilearn.

 

Week

SIX

Decolonisation in Settler States: Comparative perspectives on indigenous experiences.

 

Aboriginal Land Rights In the 60s & 70s

Prepare,  then Answer two in class  quiz questions,

one on lecture, one on  seminar reading

 Reflect upon your learning on ilearn

Submit primary source exercise via turnitin on Friday

Week SEVEN

The International Counterculture: Anti-Americanism learned from America?

Protesting Vietnam in Australia

Prepare,  then Answer two in class  quiz questions,

one on lecture, one on  seminar reading

 Reflect upon your learning on ilearn

Week EIGHT

Essay Writing Workshop

 

Read resources & bring along draft essay to usual tutorial times for peer review

Week NINE

Crises in the 70s: the dismal decade?

Australian Cultural Nationalism

Prepare,  then Answer two in class  quiz questions,

one on lecture,  one on  seminar reading

 Reflect upon your learning on ilearn

Week TEN

Globalisation & rise of  ‘Asia’: tiger economies

Australia after the White Australia Policy

Prepare,  then Answer two in class  quiz questions,

one on lecture,  one on  seminar reading

 Reflect upon your learning on ilearn

Week ELEVEN

NeoLiberalism: end of post war Keynesian consensus?

Capitalism gone Wild?

Prepare,  then Answer two in class  quiz questions,

one on lecture, one on  seminar reading

 Reflect upon your learning on ilearn

Week TWELVE

Living in the New World Order: Conspicuous Consumption?

Australians Abroad: Tourism in Asia

Prepare,  then Answer two in class  quiz questions,

one on lecture, one on  seminar reading

 Reflect upon your learning on ilearn

Submit Essay due Friday midnight

Week THIRTEEN

21st Century Challenges: Terrorism, GFC, climate change and people on the move worldwide

 

Australia & the War on Terror

Prepare,  then Answer two in class  quiz questions,

one on lecture, one on  seminar reading

 Reflect upon your learning on ilearn then Reflect upon it

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Late penalties, Extensions and Disruption to Studies

Assessments handed in late in this subject will be penalised at 2% per day late, with Saturday and Sunday counting as one day. Assessments handed in after the Post Date on Turnitin (ie the date on which assessments are returned to students) will not be accepted without a Disruption to Studies application.

Informal extensions of up to one week need to be approved by the course convener. Extensions of more than one week need to be made via the Disruption to Studies policy, outlined above.

No extensions are available on the weekly quiz. If a Disruption to Studies application covers a weekly quiz, then alternative arrangements will be made in that case.

 

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe key episodes in world history since 1945, including the role of the United States, Europe and East Asia, and the major events of the Cold War and post-Cold War period.
  • Characterise the concept of the Australian nation in its global context, emphasising the interconnectedness of Australian history.
  • Explain the way that global ideas are changed by exposure to local culture and political conditions when they are adopted by Australians.
  • Identify relevant scholarly material using various ethical historical research methods to create an original argument.
  • Evaluate historical information understanding that this knowledge is constructed within contemporary political agendas and social debates.
  • Critique opinions about the past, supported by scholarly evidence and verified through debate with peers in classroom/online discussion.
  • Assemble and synthesise historical information to form an evidence-based argument in clear scholarly written format

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly discussion and quiz
  • Secondary Source Exercise
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Research Essay

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Evaluate historical information understanding that this knowledge is constructed within contemporary political agendas and social debates.
  • Critique opinions about the past, supported by scholarly evidence and verified through debate with peers in classroom/online discussion.
  • Assemble and synthesise historical information to form an evidence-based argument in clear scholarly written format

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly discussion and quiz
  • Secondary Source Exercise
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Research Essay

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Characterise the concept of the Australian nation in its global context, emphasising the interconnectedness of Australian history.
  • Identify relevant scholarly material using various ethical historical research methods to create an original argument.
  • Evaluate historical information understanding that this knowledge is constructed within contemporary political agendas and social debates.
  • Critique opinions about the past, supported by scholarly evidence and verified through debate with peers in classroom/online discussion.
  • Assemble and synthesise historical information to form an evidence-based argument in clear scholarly written format

Assessment tasks

  • Secondary Source Exercise
  • Research Essay

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe key episodes in world history since 1945, including the role of the United States, Europe and East Asia, and the major events of the Cold War and post-Cold War period.
  • Characterise the concept of the Australian nation in its global context, emphasising the interconnectedness of Australian history.
  • Explain the way that global ideas are changed by exposure to local culture and political conditions when they are adopted by Australians.
  • Identify relevant scholarly material using various ethical historical research methods to create an original argument.
  • Evaluate historical information understanding that this knowledge is constructed within contemporary political agendas and social debates.
  • Critique opinions about the past, supported by scholarly evidence and verified through debate with peers in classroom/online discussion.
  • Assemble and synthesise historical information to form an evidence-based argument in clear scholarly written format

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly discussion and quiz
  • Secondary Source Exercise
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Research Essay

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe key episodes in world history since 1945, including the role of the United States, Europe and East Asia, and the major events of the Cold War and post-Cold War period.
  • Characterise the concept of the Australian nation in its global context, emphasising the interconnectedness of Australian history.
  • Explain the way that global ideas are changed by exposure to local culture and political conditions when they are adopted by Australians.
  • Identify relevant scholarly material using various ethical historical research methods to create an original argument.
  • Evaluate historical information understanding that this knowledge is constructed within contemporary political agendas and social debates.
  • Critique opinions about the past, supported by scholarly evidence and verified through debate with peers in classroom/online discussion.
  • Assemble and synthesise historical information to form an evidence-based argument in clear scholarly written format

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly discussion and quiz
  • Secondary Source Exercise
  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Research Essay

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Explain the way that global ideas are changed by exposure to local culture and political conditions when they are adopted by Australians.
  • Assemble and synthesise historical information to form an evidence-based argument in clear scholarly written format

Assessment tasks

  • Primary Source Analysis
  • Research Essay

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Characterise the concept of the Australian nation in its global context, emphasising the interconnectedness of Australian history.
  • Identify relevant scholarly material using various ethical historical research methods to create an original argument.
  • Evaluate historical information understanding that this knowledge is constructed within contemporary political agendas and social debates.
  • Assemble and synthesise historical information to form an evidence-based argument in clear scholarly written format

Assessment task

  • Research Essay

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Characterise the concept of the Australian nation in its global context, emphasising the interconnectedness of Australian history.
  • Identify relevant scholarly material using various ethical historical research methods to create an original argument.
  • Evaluate historical information understanding that this knowledge is constructed within contemporary political agendas and social debates.
  • Assemble and synthesise historical information to form an evidence-based argument in clear scholarly written format

Assessment task

  • Research Essay

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe key episodes in world history since 1945, including the role of the United States, Europe and East Asia, and the major events of the Cold War and post-Cold War period.
  • Characterise the concept of the Australian nation in its global context, emphasising the interconnectedness of Australian history.
  • Explain the way that global ideas are changed by exposure to local culture and political conditions when they are adopted by Australians.
  • Identify relevant scholarly material using various ethical historical research methods to create an original argument.
  • Evaluate historical information understanding that this knowledge is constructed within contemporary political agendas and social debates.
  • Critique opinions about the past, supported by scholarly evidence and verified through debate with peers in classroom/online discussion.

Assessment task

  • Research Essay

Changes from Previous Offering

This unit will be delivered as an entirely flipped unit.