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MHIS300 – Making History: Capstone Unit

2017 – S2 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Convenor
Alison Holland
Contact via x 8829
TBA
TBA
Co-Convenor
Dr Matthew Bailey
Contact via TBA
TBA
TBA
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
(39cp at 100 level or above including 3cp in HIST or MHIS units at 300 level) or (3cp in HIST or MHIS units at 300 level and (6cp in HIST or MHIS or POL units at 200 level including 3cp in HIST or MHIS units at 200 level))
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit is intended to teach and assess the skills that we believe modern history majors should acquire during their study. Students design a research project, identify the best way to achieve its objectives, identify the relevant research materials and archives, and produce a professional piece of written work that communicates their findings in the most appropriate format. Students also work with people from different backgrounds, give and receive valuable feedback that improves their work, and communicate their findings orally in clear and concise presentations.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. reflect on discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application in their careers
  2. synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas
  3. extend their analytical and critical thinking
  4. build and consolidate communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal)
  5. understand what historical literacy is
  6. work independently and collaboratively on solving problems

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Debate 50% Weeks 11 & 12
Briefing Paper OR Lesson Plan 30% Friday, 10th November, 7 pm
Active Collaboration 10% Assessed across semester
Reflective Exercise 10% Wednesday, 15th November, 7 pm

Debate

Due: Weeks 11 & 12
Weighting: 50%

Students choose their pre-determined topics and positions from a hat at the beginning of the semester (days students) and will be distributed to external students via unit convenor. The groups then work on their debates individually and collectively across the semester both in class and externally.

The debate topics are broad, designed to allow students to range across topics and themes they may have covered in other units. There is a rubric for this activity. The key is that the debaters have to think about their topics in an historical/ historiographical way. There must be an historical dimension to the debate and this will figure in the rubric.

Where the groups don’t neatly divide into 6 and there are 1-5 people left over another method known as ‘Jigsaw’ will be used for those students which is a commensurate activity/assessment requiring students to operate in similar ways as debaters around a topic. If this eventuates there will be discussion and explanation in week 1. The same applies for the external students.

This activity culminates in a ‘debating cup’ in weeks 11 and 12 (day and external), where all debates and the jigsaw (where there is one) will be presented. The unit convenor will be the chair/moderator. The winning debating team will be determined by the loudest audience applause on the day. The chair will also judge the best debate for each class.

Two stages of formative assessment:

Week 6 – 4th September – Individual presentations for both the debates and the jigsaw (each student submits a draft of their key points to the convenor which has to have an annotated bibliography attached of 3-5 works)

Week 10 – 16th October – Group presentation (each group submits a draft of their debate to the convenor using the form provided)

For external students

Group preparation for debate - use Zoom app (all instructions will be given in the first week of semester). Also - please make sure you check the instruction video on the iLearn homepage about how to use Zoom.

  • Zoom will be used to discuss debate, topic approaches, who is to research topics etc
  • Whilst on Zoom one of the group will create a (shared) Google doc to take notes and to manage progression of tasks. 
  • Students can schedule and collaborate their own zoom sessions  via their mq student email address.

Group delivery of the debate - use Zoom

Students will be advised of the time and date they will be required to deliver the debate using Zoom in the first week of class via announcements on iLearn.

External students will be provided with the schedule meeting link for the debate in iLearn.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • reflect on discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application in their careers
  • synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas
  • extend their analytical and critical thinking
  • build and consolidate communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal)
  • understand what historical literacy is
  • work independently and collaboratively on solving problems

Briefing Paper OR Lesson Plan

Due: Friday, 10th November, 7 pm
Weighting: 30%

Students will choose to do EITHER a Briefing Paper OR School Lesson Plans

Briefing Paper

Write a briefing report for a leading bureaucrat working in field/industry/government department. See topics below.

Topics for Briefing Paper

Choose one from the list below:

  1. The Minister for Immigration is hosting a briefing session for his department around his proposed changes to refugee policy. He needs some context for past policy and the contexts within which these policies were set. He asks for a briefing report on key moments in refugee policy across the second half of the twentieth century.
  2. Write a briefing report for the secretary of the Department of the environment. The minister is concerned about the sharp increase in social protest over environmental issues and wants to identify the core concerns.
  3. Write a briefing report for the Minister for Indigenous Affairs providing background to the question of constitutional recognition for Aboriginal people in Australia.
  4. The Australian government is revising Australian foreign policy in the Asia-Pacific region as a consequence of the rise of China. The Minister for Foreign Affairs requests a briefing paper on the history of Australia’s relations with China since 1972, with particular interest in Australia’s efforts to balance trade and security relations. 
  5. BuildCor is a large construction company wishing to build a multi-million dollar development in The Rocks, Sydney. They are aware of protests over such developments in the past. They hire a historical consultant and want a briefing paper on citizen protests of the last 50 years. They are particularly interested in how they were resolved.
  6. A production company is interested in producing a film exploring the changing face of masculinity in late twentieth century Australia or America. They hire a consultant to produce a briefing paper which outlines the changes, with particular reference to a set of types and examples of such.
  7. The director of the National Gallery of Australia requires context for the purchase of significant works of premodern art. She hires a historical consultant to map out the key arguments in support.

Length: 2 pages

School Lesson Plans

Choose a topic from the NSW Secondary Schools History Syllabus (K-10) and construct a lesson plan for it (http://syllabus.nesa.nsw.edu.au/hsie/history-k10/).

Include the following:

  • Unit of Study
  • Topic
  • Summary
  • Learning Goals
  • Materials/Resources
  • Content/Description/Procedure
  • Syllabus Outcomes
  • Assessment Tasks

Length: 2 pages


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • reflect on discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application in their careers
  • synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas
  • extend their analytical and critical thinking
  • build and consolidate communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal)

Active Collaboration

Due: Assessed across semester
Weighting: 10%

Students will be assessed on their active collaboration in all aspects of the unit across the semester. The following criteria will apply:

  • Collaboration with peers in all groups tasks (Co-operation, listening, effective communication, sharing, respect)
  • Effective Communication (Participation and contribution to all class discussions and in collaboration with peers, respect, consideration)
  • Engagement (Participating in and engaging with the unit overall, the content, the discussions and all the activities)
  • Presence (Attendance, preparedness, focus, curiosity, contributions)

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • reflect on discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application in their careers
  • synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas
  • build and consolidate communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal)
  • understand what historical literacy is
  • work independently and collaboratively on solving problems

Reflective Exercise

Due: Wednesday, 15th November, 7 pm
Weighting: 10%

Write a letter to an imaginary future employer reflecting on your skills, experience and knowledge and how being a modern history major equips you for the job. Career Development Consultant, Tania Currie, will identify a set of potential jobs and you will select one to write your reflection.  

Length: Up to 800 words


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • reflect on discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application in their careers
  • synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas
  • extend their analytical and critical thinking
  • understand what historical literacy is

Delivery and Resources

This unit consists of a weekly two-hour seminar.

The prime resource for the unit is iLearn (http://iLearn.mq.edu.au).

It is vital that students familiarise themselves with the site and move through it from week to week, undertaking the required readings and the associated activities.

The unit convenor also uses the iLearn homepage to post important resources, announcements and links.

All required readings for the unit are in e-reserve/online readings.

Special Instructions for External Students

All activities undertaken in this unit are designed for both day and external students (including the debates). The iLearn site is particularly important for external students. Most of our discussions will take place via the discussion forum.

In the first week of the unit there will be specific instructions, via the online introductory video and the discussion forum, about how externals will undertake the unit and its various components, particularly the Debates.

A time will be allocated in that first week for the online debates. It is vital that you note the time and date and make sure you are available.

Other instructions for the debates are:

  • Group delivery of the debate - use Zoom ap
  • Zoom will be used to discuss debate, topic approaches, who is to research topics etc
  • Whilst on Zoom one of the group will create a (shared) Google doc to take notes and to manage progression of tasks. 
  • Students can schedule and collaborate their own zoom sessions  via their mq student email address.

Students will be provided with the schedule meeting link for the debate in iLearn.

 

 

Unit Schedule

Week Topic
1 - 31 August - 4 July Introductory
2 - 7-11 August What is History and Does it Matter?
3 - 14-18 August Historical Literacy: Asking Questions
4 - 21-25 August Historical Literacy: Critical Thinking
5 - 28 August - 1 September Historical Literacy: Historical Imagination
6 - 4-8 September History Today?
7 - 11-15 September Q&A with Modern History Alumni
8 - 2-6 October PUBLIC HOLIDAY (no classes)
9 - 9-13 October History and Policy
10 - 16-20 October History in the Media
11 - 23-27 October DEBATES
12 - 30 October - 3 November

DEBATES

13 - 6 November - 10 November Reflection

 

Learning and Teaching Activities

Learning and Teaching Activities

All learning activities are listed in the weekly blocks on iLearn.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • reflect on discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application in their careers
  • synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas
  • work independently and collaboratively on solving problems

Assessment tasks

  • Debate
  • Briefing Paper OR Lesson Plan

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • reflect on discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application in their careers
  • build and consolidate communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal)
  • understand what historical literacy is
  • work independently and collaboratively on solving problems

Assessment tasks

  • Debate
  • Briefing Paper OR Lesson Plan
  • Active Collaboration
  • Reflective Exercise

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • reflect on discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application in their careers
  • extend their analytical and critical thinking
  • work independently and collaboratively on solving problems

Assessment tasks

  • Debate
  • Briefing Paper OR Lesson Plan
  • Active Collaboration

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • reflect on discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application in their careers
  • synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas
  • extend their analytical and critical thinking
  • build and consolidate communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal)
  • understand what historical literacy is

Assessment tasks

  • Debate
  • Briefing Paper OR Lesson Plan
  • Reflective Exercise

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • reflect on discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application in their careers
  • synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas

Assessment tasks

  • Debate
  • Briefing Paper OR Lesson Plan
  • Reflective Exercise

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • reflect on discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application in their careers
  • synthesise and integrate knowledge from multiple topic areas
  • extend their analytical and critical thinking

Assessment tasks

  • Debate
  • Briefing Paper OR Lesson Plan

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • extend their analytical and critical thinking
  • work independently and collaboratively on solving problems

Assessment tasks

  • Briefing Paper OR Lesson Plan
  • Active Collaboration

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • reflect on discipline specific skills and graduate capabilities and their potential application in their careers
  • build and consolidate communication skills (written, oral, interpersonal)

Assessment tasks

  • Debate
  • Active Collaboration

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • understand what historical literacy is

Assessment task

  • Reflective Exercise