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PICT310 – Insecurity and Development

2017 – S1 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Dalbir Ahlawat
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
(39cp at 100 level or above) including PICT212
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit introduces students to the causal relationships between conflict, insecurity and development. It provides students with an analysis of the conflict dynamics within states that lack the capacity to provide security to their own citizens. It addresses the key theories on civil war as well and political and economic development, using empirical key case studies. The unit also explores different types of coercive and non-coercive intervention and peace-building, and their likely effects in addressing the security problems. It also examines the effects of insecurity in these countries on societal cohesion and long-term development, economic growth, life expectancy, and the provision of health and education services. The unit complements PICT111 that addresses non-traditional security threats in the twenty-first century.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify key state functions which contribute to national and human security.
  2. Explain the relationship between state fragility and insecurity.
  3. Critically assess the security-development nexus,including its relationship to peace-building efforts.
  4. Apply theories about the causes of conflict to case studies.
  5. Critically analyse the theories of development
  6. Critically analyse the paradigms of security and development through case studies.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Introductory Essay 20% See the iLearn
Major Essay 50% See the iLearn
Participation 10% Weeks 2 to 12
Critique 20% See the iLearn

Introductory Essay

Due: See the iLearn
Weighting: 20%

The Introductory Essay  allows students to develop core disciplinary knowledge, enhance research skills, show effective written communication skills, and demonstrate originality and critical thinking. The Essay should flow logically from introduction to evidence to conclusion, should reflect wide reading across a diverse body of academic literature and should demonstrate critical analysis and objectivity. The Essay will be marked as per a set assessment criteria. For details of this criteria see the marking template in the iLearn.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key state functions which contribute to national and human security.
  • Explain the relationship between state fragility and insecurity.
  • Critically assess the security-development nexus,including its relationship to peace-building efforts.
  • Apply theories about the causes of conflict to case studies.
  • Critically analyse the theories of development
  • Critically analyse the paradigms of security and development through case studies.

Major Essay

Due: See the iLearn
Weighting: 50%

The Major Essay allows students to develop core disciplinary knowledge, enhance research skills, show effective written communication skills, and demonstrate originality and critical thinking. The Essay should flow logically from introduction to evidence to conclusion, should reflect wide reading across a diverse body of academic literature and should demonstrate critical analysis and objectivity. The Essay will be marked as per a set assessment criteria. For details of this criteria see the marking template in the iLearn.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key state functions which contribute to national and human security.
  • Explain the relationship between state fragility and insecurity.
  • Critically assess the security-development nexus,including its relationship to peace-building efforts.
  • Apply theories about the causes of conflict to case studies.
  • Critically analyse the theories of development
  • Critically analyse the paradigms of security and development through case studies.

Participation

Due: Weeks 2 to 12
Weighting: 10%

The weekly participation in 100-150 words is intended to give students the opportunity to explore in details the issues covered in the Unit and to develop a deeper understanding of the subject matter, to develop effective communications skills, and to learn from each other. The Discussion should demonstrate continuous constructive engagement from Week 2 to Week 12. The Online Discussion will be marked as per a set assessment criteria. For details of this criteria see the marking template in the ILearn. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key state functions which contribute to national and human security.
  • Explain the relationship between state fragility and insecurity.
  • Critically assess the security-development nexus,including its relationship to peace-building efforts.
  • Apply theories about the causes of conflict to case studies.
  • Critically analyse the theories of development
  • Critically analyse the paradigms of security and development through case studies.

Critique

Due: See the iLearn
Weighting: 20%

Preparation of a 500 words Critique  of one relevant article is intended to encourage independent research and demonstrate a capacity to find, synthesise and critically evaluate information relevant to specific topics or issues. The Critique should demonstrate précis of the key arguments of the article and critical evaluation of the article's merits (strengths/weaknesses). 

A detailed marking matrix is available to all enrolled students on the unit ilearn site. Marking criteria in the marking matrix includes evaluation of the Critique.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key state functions which contribute to national and human security.
  • Explain the relationship between state fragility and insecurity.
  • Critically assess the security-development nexus,including its relationship to peace-building efforts.
  • Apply theories about the causes of conflict to case studies.
  • Critically analyse the theories of development
  • Critically analyse the paradigms of security and development through case studies.

Delivery and Resources

UNIT REQUIREMENTS AND EXPECTATIONS 

* You should spend an average of 12 hours per week on this unit. This includes listening to lectures prior to seminar or tutorial, reading weekly required materials as detailed in iLearn, and preparing assessments. 

* Internal students are expected to attend all seminar or tutorial sessions, and external students are expected to make significant contributions to on-line activities. 

* In most cases students are required to attempt and submit all major assessment tasks in order to pass the unit. 

REQUIRED READINGS 

* The citations for all the required readings for this unit are available to enrolled students through the unit iLearn site, and at Macquarie University's library site. Electronic copies of required readings may be accessed through the library or will be made available by other means.

TECHNOLOGY USED AND REQUIRED 

* Computer and internet access are essential for this unit. Basic computer skills and skills in word processing are also a requirement. * This unit has an online presence. Login is via: https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/ 

* Students are required to have regular access to a computer and the internet. Mobile devices alone are not sufficient. 

SUBMITTING ASSESSMENT TASKS 

* All text-based assessment tasks are to be submitted, marked and returned electronically. This will only happen through the unit iLearn site. 

* Assessment tasks must be submitted as a MS word document by the due date. 

* Most assessment tasks will be subject to a 'TurnitIn' review as an automatic part of the submission process. 

* The granting of extensions is subject to the university’s Disruptions Policy. Extensions will not in normal circumstances be granted by unit conveners or tutors, but must be lodged through wellbeing. 

LATE SUBMISSION OF ASSESSMENT TASKS 

* If an assignment is submitted late, 5% of the available mark will be deducted for each day (including weekends) the paper is late. 

* For example, if a paper is worth 20 marks, 1 mark will be deducted from the grade given for each day that it is late (i.e. a student given 15/20 who submitted 4 days late will lose 4 marks = 11/20). 

* The same principle applies if an extension is granted and the assignment is submitted later than the amended date.

WORD LIMITS FOR ASSESSMENT TASKS 

* Stated word limits include footnotes and footnoted references, but not bibliography, or title page. 

* Word limits can generally deviate by 10% either over or under the stated figure. 

* If the number of words exceeds the limit by more than 10%, then penalties will apply. These penalties are 5% of the awarded mark for every 100 words over the word limit. If a paper is 300 words over, for instance, it will lose 3 x 5% = 15% of the total mark awarded for the assignment. This percentage is taken off the total mark, i.e. if a paper was graded at a credit (65%) and was 300 words over, it would be reduced by 15 marks to a pass (50%). 

* The application of this penalty is at the discretion of the course convener. 

REASSESSMENT OF ASSIGNMENTS DURING THE SEMESTER 

* Macquarie University operates a Grade Appeal Policy in cases where students feel their work was graded inappropriately. 

STAFF AVAILABILITY 

* Department staff will endeavor to answer student enquiries in a timely manner. However, emails or iLearn messages will not usually be answered over the weekend or public holiday period. 

* Students are encouraged to read the Unit Guide and look at instructions posted on the iLearn site before sending email requests to staff

Unit Schedule

Week 1 

Introduction: 

Conceptual and theoretical perspectives to understand state, security and development.

Week 2

The development-security nexus 

Somalia: Does development precede or follow security? 

Question 1: Does economic, political and military development create insecurity? 

Week 3

Economic development and conflict 

Fiji: Does economic development unite or divide society? 

Week 4

Democratic development and conflict 

The Balkans: Does democratisation promote perpetual peace and/or encourage ethnic cleansing? 

Week 5 

Military technology and conflict 

Iran: Nuclear weapons as a source of stability? 

Question 2: Can security be managed in an era of limited sovereignty? 

Week 6

State-building and security 

Afghanistan and Iraq: Is the creation of a sovereign state by foreign powers a necessity or contradiction in terms? 

Week 7

The weak state insecurity dilemma 

Syria and North Korea: Too strong or too weak? 

Week 8

Decline of the state? 

The UK and the European Union: Does the decline of the state create global citizens or revive nationalism? 

Question 3: What are the development dilemmas? 

Week 9

Global financial crisis and security

China and US: Winners and Losers

Week 10

Environmental Refugees? Climate Change and the Shrinking State

Tuvalu: To adapt or flee?

Week 11

Water Security

Laos: The problem of economic development versus human security in Least Developed Countries 

Week 12

International institutions and security 

ASEAN – Indispensable or redundant 

Week 13

Conclusion 

Future Development and Insecurity 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key state functions which contribute to national and human security.
  • Explain the relationship between state fragility and insecurity.
  • Critically assess the security-development nexus,including its relationship to peace-building efforts.
  • Apply theories about the causes of conflict to case studies.
  • Critically analyse the theories of development
  • Critically analyse the paradigms of security and development through case studies.

Assessment tasks

  • Introductory Essay
  • Major Essay
  • Participation
  • Critique

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key state functions which contribute to national and human security.
  • Explain the relationship between state fragility and insecurity.
  • Critically assess the security-development nexus,including its relationship to peace-building efforts.
  • Apply theories about the causes of conflict to case studies.
  • Critically analyse the theories of development
  • Critically analyse the paradigms of security and development through case studies.

Assessment tasks

  • Introductory Essay
  • Major Essay
  • Participation
  • Critique

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key state functions which contribute to national and human security.
  • Explain the relationship between state fragility and insecurity.
  • Critically assess the security-development nexus,including its relationship to peace-building efforts.
  • Apply theories about the causes of conflict to case studies.
  • Critically analyse the theories of development
  • Critically analyse the paradigms of security and development through case studies.

Assessment tasks

  • Introductory Essay
  • Major Essay
  • Participation
  • Critique

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key state functions which contribute to national and human security.
  • Explain the relationship between state fragility and insecurity.
  • Critically assess the security-development nexus,including its relationship to peace-building efforts.
  • Apply theories about the causes of conflict to case studies.
  • Critically analyse the theories of development
  • Critically analyse the paradigms of security and development through case studies.

Assessment tasks

  • Introductory Essay
  • Major Essay
  • Participation
  • Critique

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key state functions which contribute to national and human security.
  • Explain the relationship between state fragility and insecurity.
  • Critically assess the security-development nexus,including its relationship to peace-building efforts.
  • Apply theories about the causes of conflict to case studies.
  • Critically analyse the theories of development
  • Critically analyse the paradigms of security and development through case studies.

Assessment tasks

  • Introductory Essay
  • Major Essay
  • Participation
  • Critique

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key state functions which contribute to national and human security.
  • Explain the relationship between state fragility and insecurity.
  • Critically assess the security-development nexus,including its relationship to peace-building efforts.
  • Apply theories about the causes of conflict to case studies.
  • Critically analyse the theories of development
  • Critically analyse the paradigms of security and development through case studies.

Assessment tasks

  • Introductory Essay
  • Major Essay
  • Participation
  • Critique

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key state functions which contribute to national and human security.
  • Explain the relationship between state fragility and insecurity.
  • Critically assess the security-development nexus,including its relationship to peace-building efforts.
  • Apply theories about the causes of conflict to case studies.
  • Critically analyse the theories of development
  • Critically analyse the paradigms of security and development through case studies.

Assessment tasks

  • Introductory Essay
  • Major Essay
  • Participation
  • Critique

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key state functions which contribute to national and human security.
  • Critically analyse the theories of development

Assessment tasks

  • Major Essay
  • Participation

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key state functions which contribute to national and human security.
  • Explain the relationship between state fragility and insecurity.
  • Critically assess the security-development nexus,including its relationship to peace-building efforts.
  • Apply theories about the causes of conflict to case studies.
  • Critically analyse the theories of development
  • Critically analyse the paradigms of security and development through case studies.

Assessment tasks

  • Introductory Essay
  • Major Essay
  • Participation
  • Critique