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PSYC105 – Introduction to Psychology II

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Course Convenor
Dr Alissa Beath
Thursday 10am-1pm
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
[Admission to BPsych(Hons) or BA-Psych or BA-PsychBEd(Prim) or BA-PsychBHlth or BA-PsychLLB or BBABA-Psych or BBABPsych(Hons) or BComBA-Psych or BComBPsych(Hons) or BPsych(Hons)BHlth or BPsych(Hons)LLB or BSc-Psych or BHlth or BHumanSc or BSpHearingSc or BSpHLSc or BMedScs or GDipSphComm or DipSphComm or BA-PsychBHumanSc or BPsych(Hons)BHumanSc] or [for all continuing students 12cp or PSY104(P) or PSYC104]
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit continues with the introduction to the core areas of psychology commenced in PSYC104. The program introduces the areas of social psychology, developmental psychology, perception, cognition, learning, and statistics. Additionally, this unit provides students with first-hand experience conducting a research project and writing a scientific report.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Preparation for further study in psychology
  2. Research and study skills
  3. Communication and interpersonal skills
  4. Information technology skills
  5. Critical thinking skills
  6. Appreciation of ethical issues

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Research Participation 5% 03/11/2017
Research Report 30% 03/10/2017
Group Presentation 5% Week 6 (in class)
Online Statistics Quizzes 10% 5pm each Sunday
Final Exam 50% University examination period

Research Participation

Due: 03/11/2017
Weighting: 5%

Research participation is educationally beneficial for students. First, students can learn a good deal about a particular topic by participating in research. Students can learn how psychological theories lead to psychological studies and how different methodological approaches are applied to test research hypotheses. Second, research participation assists students in understanding the importance of ethical conduct in psychological research. 

The research participation component of PSYC105 assessment involves a total of 4 hours of participation (8 credits) in research conducted within the Department of Psychology. Time spent is credited on a pro rata basis. 15 min = 0.5 credits, 30 min = 1 credit, 45 min = 1.5 credit, 1 hr = 2 credits, etc.

To ensure that you obtain experience with a variety of methods for conducting research, you are required to participate in at least 2 hours of face-to-face research studies. That is, you will not receive more than 4 of your 8 research credits from online studies. Studies are run at a variety of days and times, including after hours and weekends, in order to accommodate a range of student timetables.

We use SONA, a participant pool, to connect students with researchers. A large number of psychology research projects are being conducted in 2017 by staff members, research assistants, postgraduate students, and honours students. To search for projects, make bookings, and view research participation records, go to: www.subjectpool.com/mq/participant/. The PSYC105 SONA pool opens on 06/07/2017 and will close at 5pm Friday 03/11/2017 (Week 12). Students must complete their research participation before the pool closes.

If you completed PSYC104 in Semester 1 or enrolled in PSYC105 prior to 01/07/2017, you should be automatically enrolled in SONA.  If you do not have an account, you need to email psy_pool.admin@mq.edu.au with the following information: First & Last name; Student ID number; MQ email address; PSY Unit Number (i.e. PSYC105)

EXAMPLE:  Name: John Smith, Student ID: 43409999, email: john.smith@students.mq.edu.au, course: PSYC105

After registering for a study, students should keep a record of the following details:         

  • The researcher's name
  • The date and time of the study
  • The location of the study
  • The contact phone number

You are required to keep your appointments. If, as a result of illness or misadventure, you are unable to keep an appointment, you must notify the researcher prior to your appointment. Failure to do so will result in a penalty. The total number of hours (and thus assessment mark) that you have accrued over the semester will be posted on the PSYC105 website by 9am on 06/11/2017 for you to check. In case of any discrepancy, you can appeal by 5pm on 10/11/2017. To appeal, send an email to psy_pool.admin@mq.edu.au and copy in (CC) PSYC105@mq.edu.au. In the email, include how many credits you were awarded, and how many credits you think you should have been awarded. Additionally, for each study you participated in, include the 1) experimenter's name, 2) the date and time of the experiment, and 3) how long it took you to complete the study.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Preparation for further study in psychology
  • Appreciation of ethical issues

Research Report

Due: 03/10/2017
Weighting: 30%

The PSYC105 research report requires students to write a psychology report based on data that they have been involved in collecting. Writing empirical papers is one way that psychologists disseminate research findings. The research report must be 1500 (+/- 150) words in length. The title page and reference list are not included in this word limit, but in-text citations are included in this word limit. Your report must include a title page, the body of the report (with separate sections of an introduction, method, results, discussion) and a reference list. More details on the report will be provided in tutorial classes and posted to iLearn.

This research report must follow the APA Style rules, detailed in the "Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association." This is a psychology report, not a biology, chemistry, or law report, so do not use another referencing style. Marks will be awarded for correctly following APA Style rules, and you will lose marks if you do not apply the rules correctly. You can find out more about APA Style rules by attending tutorials and by reading the sixth edition of the "Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association" (one of the PSYC105 required textbooks).

Some starter references have been provided for you (see iLearn for details). You MUST read, use and cite these references in your report. Students are also required to find at least THREE additional references (peer-reviewed articles published in a scientific journal) of their own to use in the report. The Group Presentation assessment will help students with this task. When selecting articles to use as references, think about what will most assist you in telling a logical story. In using published research to support and evaluate the research project in your report, you are expected to reflect carefully on the instructions and feedback given during the tutorials.

Participating in tutorials will be essential for writing your research report. During tutorials, the literature will be reviewed, the class project will be discussed, hypotheses will be generated, data will be presented, and APA Style guidelines will be reviewed. Additionally, you also will assess a past report using the unit’s marking criteria. This activity will be invaluable in helping you to avoid common pitfalls encountered when writing your first psychology research report!

The research report must be submitted electronically via a Turnitin link on iLearn. Turnitin is anti-plagiarism software that will compare your paper to your classmates' papers, to papers from previous students at Macquarie University and other universities, as well as to material on the Internet (e.g., the articles you will be citing, websites, etc.).  Students should take note of the similarity index of their report when it is uploaded (though please note that it can take up to 24 hours for the Turnitin report to be processed). Students can delete and re-upload their report as many times as they like until the report deadline. Please note that if you want to re-upload a paper, you must wait at least one hour from withdrawing a previous document. Thus, the last time you can check your similarity indices is at 4pm on 03/10/2017 if you want the opportunity to upload a revision. 

We expect that students are aware of what does and doesn’t constitute academic dishonesty and plagiarism. To learn about this, students are expected to complete the online Academic Integrity Module for Students: a link can be found on the PSYC105 iLearn page or via this website http://students.mq.edu.au/support/learning_skills/academic_integrity_module_for_students/.  Students are also expected to read Macquarie University's Academic Honesty Policy, http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html. Not knowing what constitutes an act of academic dishonestly is not grounds for excusing inappropriate behaviour.

Students should be aware that iLearn and Turnitin can lag when large numbers of students are uploading documents at the same time. Submission time for assignments will be counted as the time the assessment was received, not the time the uploading began. Because of this, make sure you don't leave your submission to 4:55pm the day it is due! Late penalties will be applied to assignments that are received after the due time.

Penalties will be applied when requirements are not met: 

·  A penalty of 5% of the maximum mark per day (including weekends) will be applied to late assignments. For example, if a student submits the Research Report one day late, then 1.5 marks [= 5% x 30 (worth 30% of the final grade)] will be subtracted from the original mark. If a student completes the Research Report 3 days late, then 5.5 marks [= 3(5% x 30)] will be subtracted from the original mark. Assignments received after the 5pm deadline are considered late (even if it is only a matter of minutes!)

·  A penalty of 5% of the maximum mark (1.5 marks [= 5% x 30]) will be deducted from the research report for every additional 150 words over or under the limit.

Attend tutorials and visit iLearn for information on marking criteria.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Preparation for further study in psychology
  • Research and study skills
  • Communication and interpersonal skills
  • Information technology skills
  • Critical thinking skills
  • Appreciation of ethical issues

Group Presentation

Due: Week 6 (in class)
Weighting: 5%

Presentations at scientific conferences are another method that psychologists use for disseminating and learning about research findings. Accordingly, during the Week 6 tutorial, your group will give a 10-minute presentation on one research article that you find which is relevant to the Research Report. (This article must not be one of the starter references you have been provided with.) The presentation must be done using PowerPoint or another computer-based presentation software. Presentations are to cover the entire research process (e.g., background, methods, results, discussion), similar to a research report. Students will form their groups in the Week 2 tutorial, and be expected to find time to work together between then and Week 6 when the presentations will take place.

Each member of the group is expected to present (speak) for approximately the same amount of time, so you will need to divide the 10 minutes up accordingly. This could be achieved by each member covering different aspects of their presentation (e.g., one person to cover the background information, one person to cover the methodology, one person to cover the results, and another person to cover the discussion), or some other arrangement that the group thinks is fair. Even if different people present different segments, presentations should flow as if one person has written the talk. This means that a good presentation requires great teamwork! Finally, academic integrity applies to research presentations, so do not forget to cite and reference appropriately.

Your team should arrive to the Week 6 tutorial with a copy of your presentation saved to a USB device and with a hard-copy of your presentation to submit to your tutor. Failure to present your tutor with a hard-copy of your presentation at the beginning of the tutorial will result in a penalty.

If you cannot attend your Week 6 tutorial due to a serious and unavoidable disruption and you are not there for the presentation, and if your team agrees that you fully contributed to the development of the presentation, you may lodge a Disruption to Studies request via ask.mq.edu.au and apply for an alternate time to deliver the entire presentation on your own in front of your tutor and/or the unit convener and/or the assistant to the unit convener. This will only be considered if the request meets the requirements of Disruption to Studies (see http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html for information on the policy).


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Preparation for further study in psychology
  • Research and study skills
  • Communication and interpersonal skills
  • Information technology skills
  • Critical thinking skills

Online Statistics Quizzes

Due: 5pm each Sunday
Weighting: 10%

One-third of PSYC105 course content is focused on applied psychological statistics; both learning the fundamental concepts and understanding how to summarise data and perform statistical analyses using the statistical software Stata. Your ability to understand statistical concepts is assessed in weekly, online quizzes that occur during Weeks 2-13.

Statistics quizzes are to be completed in students’ own time throughout the week. Each quiz will cover information delivered that week in lectures and the corresponding textbook sections. The quizzes open each Monday at 9am and close the following Sunday at 5pm. Each quiz is comprised of 5 questions (short-answer or multiple-choice format). The quizzes are to be completed within the online statistics textbook (see 'Delivery and Resources section').


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Preparation for further study in psychology
  • Research and study skills
  • Information technology skills

Final Exam

Due: University examination period
Weighting: 50%

The final exam is held during the university final examination period (13/11/2017 – 01/12/2017) and consists of 95 multiple-choice questions. Students are allowed 2 hours plus 10 minutes reading time to complete the exam. Questions are derived from the lectures (including statistics lectures), tutorials, and the required readings. There will be five response options for each question. There is only one correct answer to each question. Wrong answers are not penalised (that is, the total score is simply the sum of correct answers: you are not penalised for guessing). Past exam papers are not available, but a full-length practice exam will be available on iLearn after the final course content has been taught (end of Week 13).

Students complete the multiple choice exam by filling in a multiple choice answer sheet. These sheet are scanned and read by a computer to produce each student’s final exam mark. It is crucial that you write your name and Student ID number on both the final exam question paper and also the multiple choice answer sheet during exam time. Failing to do either or both of these, or incorrectly entering your details, will result in your exam not being marked: how can we give you marks if we don’t know who you are?! Don’t let all the hard work you put into the final exam go to waste by not filling in the answer sheet correctly!

You are expected to present yourself for examination at the time and place designated in the University Examination Timetable. The timetable will be available in Draft form approximately eight weeks before the commencement of the examinations and in Final form approximately four weeks before the commencement of the examinations. http://www.timetables.mq.edu.au/exam


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Preparation for further study in psychology
  • Research and study skills
  • Critical thinking skills

Delivery and Resources

The class timetable can be found at: http://www.timetables.mq.edu.au/2017

PSYC105 lectures each week include a 2-hour psychology lecture (face-to-face / online) and 1-hour statistics lectures (online only). 

Psychology lectures

Students must attend / listen to ONE of the below:

  • Initial: Monday 4-6pm (W2.4A Macquarie Theatre), OR
  • Repeat: Thursday 12-2pm (W2.4A Macquarie Theatre), OR
  • Live lecture stream: Available through iLearn, Monday 4-6pm , OR
  • iLecture (ECHO recordings on iLearn)

 

Statistics lectures

Each week students must listen to 1 hour of online lectures. Recorded lectures will be available from iLearn.

 

Tutorials

Each week of session, starting Week 2, students must attend their assigned (enrolled) tutorial class.

Students can find a tutorial schedule on iLearn.

 

Prescribed Resources

Students must access the statistical computer program Stata to complete their assessments and follow along with lectures. Students can purchase this software themselves or access it through Macquarie’s online laboratory iLab. Information will be given in the Week 1 introduction lecture and on iLearn. 

 

Each week students must read the prescribed textbook chapters. These textbook chapters cover and extend material noted in the lectures, tutorials, and statistical teachings.

Prescribed Resources

Textbooks

Each week, students must read the prescribed textbook chapters. These textbook chapters cover and extend material noted in the lectures and tutorials.

  1. American Psychological Association (2009). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
  2. Lilienfeld, S., Lynn, S., Namy, L., Woolf, N., Jamieson, G., Marks, A. & Slaughter, V. (2014). Psychology: From inquiry to understanding (2nd ed.). Frenchs Forest, Australia: Pearson Australia.
  3. Online Statistics Textbook (see below)

Accessing the Online Statistics Textbook:

  1. Click on this link: app.tophat.com/e/706352
  2. Sign-up for a Top Hat online account (‘Create account’) with your Macquarie student email address
  3. Follow the prompts to download your book (please do this BEFORE the first day of class)

Your textbook will be applied at checkout for the cost of $59.00. Don’t worry if you don’t see much content in the book right away, I will make it available to you as we progress through the semester.

 

Prior to Week 3, students must read the prescribed articles for the research report and presentation (available in the Library through “Unit Readings” on MultiSearch).

 

To understand and sufficiently complete unit requirements, students must regularly access the prescribed unit materials.

·  PSYC105 Unit Guide (downloadable from iLearn)

·  PSYC105 Tutorial Guide (downloadable from iLearn)

·  Lecture Recordings (downloadable from iLearn)

Some lecturers may upload their lecture slides onto iLearn. They are not required to do this, so when this happens, please take full advantage of it. As such, please do not ask me, or them, to paste slides in a different format (e.g., switch from pdf to PowerPoint). Additionally, do not ask them to post slides in advance. 

Learning and Teaching Activities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Identify the key terms in the areas of cognition, perception, developmental psychology, social psychology, health psychology, organisational psychology, and statistics; Discuss the key theories and research in the areas of cognition, perception, developmental psychology, social psychology, health psychology, organisational psychology, and statistics

Critical, Analytical & Integrative Thinking

• Collect, analyse, and report statistical data • Competently access, use, and synthesise information • Review and critique literature • Competently use information technology applications (e.g. iLearn, e-mail, web-browsers, etc.) • Critically evaluate psychological theories and argument • Interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions • Interpret statistical data, graphs and tables • Critically evaluate designs and analyses in psychological experiments and studies • Develop a set of useful evaluation criteria for educational resources

Problem Solving and Research Capability

• Test hypotheses in psychological experiments and studies • Describe and interpret data, graphs, and tables • Analyse data using appropriate techniques • Draw conclusions from the results of data analysis • Employ appropriate statistical tools to solve problems and to interpret the results • Organise and summarise data graphically and numerically

Creative and Innovative

• Display creative thinking skills • Construct cohesive arguments • Present ideas in new and creative ways • Consider problems from new perspectives • Generate a range of options and innovative solutions • Discern problems and gaps in knowledge • Find effective alternative solutions to problems

Effective Communication

• Demonstrate scientific report writing skills • Present ideas clearly with supporting evidence • Communicate the results of analyses clearly and effectively • Plan and present written arguments in coherent, supported, and documented form • Express ideas with clarity and rigour • Communicate complex ideas simply in jargon-free English • Present information in a coherent and integrated way

Engaged & Ethical Local and Global Citizens

• Consider the ways in which values and ethical issues affect psychological research • Evaluate information, ideas and arguments including those of diverse cultural assumptions

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

• Effectively participate in a team to carry out a specific task • Effectively manage a group to maximise attainment of goals • Analyse and solve problems collaboratively • Work pro-actively and accept responsibility when necessary

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

• Apply and adapt knowledge to the real world • Reflect on how personal experiences influence your critical analysis capacity • Recognise the strengths and limitations of psychological research • Present a balanced critical view of various psychological research • Describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in psychological research

Commitment to Continuous Learning

• Demonstrate effective time management and work organisation skills • Assess your own learning against a set of pre-selected criteria • Accurately assess your own performance • Reflect on how you have analysed information and solved problems, and incorporate lessons learnt into future work • Critically review your problem-solving approaches • Reflect on how you can apply your learning in other contexts

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Disruption to Study and Special Consideration

PSYC105 will consume a lot of your time (hopefully you enjoy every minute you spend engaged with PSYC105!). Your best approach is to treat it as you would a part-time professional job that requires you to work set hours each week. Macquarie University and myself realise that sometimes life events will interfere with your best attempts at excellent performance. In some instances, you might be allowed some flexibility in how you complete the unit. Information about Macquarie University’s Disruption to Studies Policy is found at http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html . Please note that it is your responsibility to learn about the conditions for applying for special consideration and for understanding what circumstances may lead to special consideration. Technical difficulties are not grounds for special consideration, and in most cases, extensions to quiz deadlines will not be granted.

Computers and access to the Internet are essential for participating in this course. You must use them to access content saved on iLearn, complete quizzes, perform statistical analyses, write and submit your research report, and assemble and deliver your group presentation. If you want to avoid losing any unnecessary marks, I suggest that you take responsibility for your computing. As with any professional job, you must factor in potential computer and Internet problems when aiming to meet a deadline. This means regularly saving back-up copies of your work and submitting early. If you have planned accordingly and problems arise, you can complete your assessments online using a computer in one of Macquarie University’s many computing labs. As such, technical problems are not grounds for special consideration.

Neither the unit convenor or the tutors grant extensions, only the Faculty of Human Sciences Student Services Centre does. All requests to convenors and tutors for special consideration will be ignored.

 

Requests for Remarking the Research Report

In order to mark for this unit, all tutors are trained on the marking criteria and are required to match the convenor’s set standard on an example report. Additionally, a sample of all tutor’s papers are double-marked, and if required, tutors are asked to remark in order to ensure consistent marking across the unit. Thus, it is very unlikely that your paper has been unfairly marked.

Writing for psychology is vastly different than writing for many other subjects. It is not a skill that we are born with, but one that requires much cultivating. If after a 48-hour cool-down period you have assessed your paper based on the marking criteria and still believe your paper has been unjustly marked:

1.Contact the tutor who marked your paper. Ask to set-up an in-person meeting to review your paper. You must prepare for this meeting by assembling an outline of how you met each marking criteria. Please note that “spending a lot of time on the paper” and “feeling like I did better” are unacceptable reasons for remark.

2.If differences continue after this meeting, you can apply for a re-mark of an assignment by completing a request for re-mark form, which can be obtained by contacting the Undergraduate Student Services Centre. You must attach your original assignment and a fresh unmarked copy (for the new marker). The form and attachments must be lodged at the Faculty of Human Sciences Undergraduate Student Services Centre within two weeks of the date of receipt of the assignment (i.e., no later than 17/11/2017).

3.The Course Convenor will arrange for the assignment to be marked by another staff member teaching the unit, and the assignment will be returned to the student through the Faculty of Human Sciences Undergraduate Student Services Centre. Please bear in mind that your remarked paper may receive a grade that is lower than your original grade.

 

Academic Honesty

Academic honesty is an integral part of the core values and principles contained in the Macquarie University Ethics Statement. The Policy covering Academic Honesty is available on the web at: http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html. Plagiarism is an example of dishonest academic behaviour and is defined by the Academic Honesty Policy as: “Using the work or ideas of another person and presenting this as your own without clear acknowledgement of the source of the work or ideas”. To learn about what other sorts of behaviour constitute an act of plagiarism, please read Macquarie University's Academic Honesty Policy, http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html, and complete the online Academic Integrity Module for Students, http://students.mq.edu.au/students-level_2-3_column/?xcid=53491&preview=true.

The Academic Honesty Policy notes the following responsibilities for students:

·  "Act in accordance with the principles of the Academic Honesty Policy.

·  Become familiar with what academic dishonesty is and the consequences of poor practice.

·  Use appropriate referencing techniques.

·  Seek assistance from the unit convenor to remedy any deficits or clarify discipline specific practice.

·  Submit only work of which you are the author or that properly acknowledges others.

·  Do not lend or provide your original work, marked or unmarked, to any other person for any reason.

·  Keep drafts of your own authored work and notes showing the authorship or source of ideas that are not your own.

·  Undertake any remedial or other learning activities as directed by the Faculty Discipline Committee."

Note that while informal study groups are encouraged as a good way to assist your learning, all your independently assessed assignments must be totally independently completed. Unless you are working on the Group Presentations, in which each member contributes to producing one piece of work, using part or all of someone else's work constitutes collusion and breaches the University's Academic Honesty policy.

Do not collude with any other student by selling, giving, lending, explaining or showing all or parts of your independently assessed work/answers/past or current assignments, and do not ask to buy, borrow, see and use all or parts of the work of another student. Collusion includes working on online quizzes with someone else or giving/receiving their answers.

Significant penalties can be applied for academic dishonesty. These are outlined in the Academic Dishonesty – Schedule of Penalties, which can be found at: http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/schedule_penalties.html.  

The penalties range from applying a fail grade for the assessment task or requiring the student to re-submit the assessment task for a mark no greater than 50 to applying a fail grade to the unit of study and referral to the University Discipline Committee.

 

University Policy on Grading

Academic Senate has a set of guidelines for the achievement of grades across the range from fail to high distinction. Your final result will include one of these grades plus a standardised numerical grade (SNG).

On occasion your raw mark for a unit (i.e., the total of your marks for each assessment item) may not be the same as the SNG that you receive. For more information please refer to the Macquarie University Handbook.

Please note that there is no "Pass Conceded" or "Concessional Pass." If you receive a 49 or lower, you will receive a Fail grade (see http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/grading/policy.html, Grading Policy). I will not address emails from students that ask me to pass them when they have obtained a Fail.

                  High Distinction                         85 and above

                  Distinction                                 75-84

                  Credit                                        65-74

                  Pass                                          50-64

                  Fail                                            49 and below

 

Key Student Responsibilities

1.Only use your University email account. Failure to do so will result in unread emails. It is University policy that the University issued email account will be used for official University communication.

2.Consistently devote 12 hours a week to this unit; otherwise, you may not do well in this unit. Distributed practice is one of the most helpful study strategies for ensuring that what you learn is retained over time.

3.Realise that this unit is not easy. If you regularly attend and engage with lectures, tutorials, and iLearn resources, your chances of success in this unit will be much greater than if you do not behave in that manner. 

4.Arrive to lectures and tutorials prepared. Read required material before relevant lectures/tutorials.

5.Demonstrate respect for your fellow students and unit staff. Arrive to lectures and tutorials on time. Do not use mobile phones during class time. Students who arrive late, chat, or text during class may be asked to leave.

6.Read this unit guide in its entirety. You are responsible for knowing its content and applying its information. Ask questions if you are unclear on a requirement. Let the Assistant to the Convenor and I know what section of the unit guide you find confusing and why. If you are not specific, it will be difficult for us to help you.

7.Do not skim over the unit guide and then ask questions about information covered in the unit guide - it's long for a reason.

8.Ask for help from your tutors if you have queries about tutorial content. Take advantage of the relationship you have with them, they are your only opportunity for focused attention in such a large unit.

9.Make sure you get the easy points. Complete the online quiz and follow APA Style guidelines. These are the easiest points to receive, so make sure you closely check your work on these aspects (as well as other aspects).

10.Take responsibility. It is not your tutor’s responsibility, your lecturers’ responsibility, my responsibility, or your parents’ responsibility to succeed in this unit.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Preparation for further study in psychology
  • Research and study skills

Assessment tasks

  • Research Participation
  • Research Report
  • Group Presentation
  • Online Statistics Quizzes
  • Final Exam

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Preparation for further study in psychology
  • Research and study skills
  • Communication and interpersonal skills
  • Information technology skills
  • Critical thinking skills
  • Appreciation of ethical issues

Assessment tasks

  • Research Participation
  • Research Report
  • Group Presentation
  • Online Statistics Quizzes
  • Final Exam

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Preparation for further study in psychology
  • Research and study skills
  • Information technology skills
  • Critical thinking skills

Assessment tasks

  • Research Participation
  • Research Report
  • Group Presentation
  • Online Statistics Quizzes
  • Final Exam

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Communication and interpersonal skills

Assessment tasks

  • Research Report
  • Group Presentation

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Communication and interpersonal skills

Assessment tasks

  • Research Report
  • Group Presentation

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Preparation for further study in psychology
  • Communication and interpersonal skills
  • Critical thinking skills
  • Appreciation of ethical issues

Assessment tasks

  • Research Participation
  • Research Report
  • Group Presentation
  • Online Statistics Quizzes
  • Final Exam

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Appreciation of ethical issues

Assessment tasks

  • Research Participation
  • Research Report

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Preparation for further study in psychology
  • Critical thinking skills
  • Appreciation of ethical issues

Assessment tasks

  • Research Participation
  • Research Report
  • Group Presentation
  • Online Statistics Quizzes
  • Final Exam

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Preparation for further study in psychology
  • Information technology skills
  • Critical thinking skills

Assessment tasks

  • Research Participation
  • Research Report
  • Group Presentation
  • Online Statistics Quizzes
  • Final Exam

Changes from Previous Offering

Use of the statistics program SPSS has been replaced with the program Stata.