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ECH 326 – Children, Families and Communities in a Diverse Society

2017 – S2 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Convenor
Fay Hadley
Co-Convenor
Sanobia Palkhiwala
Tutor
Catherine Jones
Tutor
Anne-Maree Tonkin
Marker
Tirzah Lim
Tutor
Wendy Shepherd
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
39cp at 100 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit examines the contexts of childhood, family conditions, neighbourhood, environmental contexts and social policies, and identifies the implications for early childhood professionals and school practitioners. Theoretical approaches to the study of families are explored, along with issues for children related to the structural and cultural diversity of families in Australia. Interconnections between children, families and communities are examined along with implications for practice.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. 1. Develop an understanding of the broad theoretical approaches to the study of children and families, including ecological theory, family systems theory, life cycle approaches, and theories of risk and resilience.
  2. 2. Identify the importance of understanding children and families within particular social, linguistic and cultural contexts, and demonstrate sensitivity to diverse perspectives, abilities and cultural ways of knowing.
  3. 3. Have a detailed knowledge of contemporary issues concerning children and families, including such things as divorce, the role of the extended family, poverty, child abuse and neglect, substitute care and community violence.
  4. 4. Develop an understanding of the unique learning requirements of children from a range of backgrounds and consider how best to accommodate this within different learning environments.
  5. 5. Identify and evaluate the range of formal and informal supports available to families with young children as well as factors that enhance connections between families and schools/childcare centres/preschools.
  6. 6. Be able to find relevant information about families, communities and early childhood services from a range of sources including the library, newspapers and electronic sources.
  7. 7. Identify bias, differences between fact and opinion and omissions in information; consider information from a variety of perspectives; as well as the usefulness, accuracy, reliability and validity of information.

General Assessment Information

Extensions and Late penalties

Applications for extensions must be made via AskMQ at https://ask.mq.edu.au as a "Disruption to Studies" request before the submission date. Students who experience a disruption to their studies through ill-health or misadventure are able to apply for this request. Extensions can only be granted if they meet the Disruption to Studies policy and are submitted via ask.mq.edu.au. This will ensure consistency in the consideration of such requests is maintained.

In general, there should be no need for extensions except through illness or misadventure that would be categorised as unavoidable disruption according to the University definition of same, and currently available at:

https://students.mq.edu.au/study/my-study-program/special-consideration/disruption-to-studies

Late submissions without extension will receive a penalty of 5% reduction of the total possible mark for each day late (including weekends and public holidays). You are reminded that submitting even just 1 day late could be the difference between passing and failing a unit. Late penalties are applied by unit convenors or their delegates after tasks are assessed.

No assessable work will be accepted after the return/release of marked work on the same topic. If a student is still permitted to submit on the basis of unavoidable disruption, an alternative topic may be set. 

Students should keep an electronic file of all assessments. Claims regarding "lost" assessments cannot be made if the file cannot be produced. It is also advisable to keep an electronic file of all drafts and the final submission on a USB untouched/unopened after submission. This can be used to demonstrate easily that the assessment has not been amended after the submission date.

Disruption to Studies

The following link takes you to the Disruption to Studies policy, which makes clear the ways in which you can apply for special consideration in times of difficulty.

http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/exams/disruption_to_studies/

 

Academic honesty

The nature of scholarly endeavour, dependent as it is on the work of others, binds all members of the University community to abide by the principles of academic honesty.

Plagiarism is a matter of particular importance. Plagiarism is defined as using the work or ideas of another person and presenting this as your own without clear acknowledgement of the source of the work or ideas. This includes, but is not limited to, any of the following acts:

  • copying out part(s) of any document or audio-visual material or computer code or website content without indicating their origins;
  • using or extracting another person's concepts, experimental results, or conclusions;
  • summarising another person's work;
  • submitting substantially the same final version of any material as another student in an assignment where there was collaborative preparatory work;
  • use of others (paid or otherwise) to conceive, research or write material submitted for assessment; and
  • submitting the same or substantially the same piece of work for two different tasks (self-plagiarism).

The University’s Academic Honesty Policy can be found on the Policy Central website: http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/index.html

 

TURNITIN is used to assist students with appropriate referencing and paraphrasing, and to detect plagiarism. The system also serves as a digital repository if anything should happen to your hard copy submission or personal backup. Please ensure you have stated your TURNITIN receipt number on your coversheet. A link to TURNITIN is embedded in iLearn.

University policy on grading

The University recognises the importance of producing grades and reports of student learning achievements that are valid, reliable and accurate representations of each student’s capabilities in relation to clearly articulated learning outcomes. Your final result for this unit will include a grade plus a standardised numerical grade (SNG).

For an explanation of the policy go to Policy Central: http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/index.html

Criteria for awarding grades for assessment tasks

Assignments will be awarded grades ranging from HD to F according to guidelines set out in the University's Grading Policy. The following descriptive criteria are included for your information.

 

Criteria for awarding grades in the unit

Students will be awarded grades ranging from HD to F according to guidelines set out in the policy: http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/grading/policy.html

The following generic grade descriptors provide university-wide standards for awarding final grades.

 

Grade

Descriptor

HD

(High Distinction)

Provides consistent evidence of deep and critical understanding in relation to the learning outcomes. There is substantial originality and insight in identifying, generating and communicating competing arguments, perspectives or problem solving approaches; critical evaluation of problems, their solutions and their implications; creativity in application as appropriate to the discipline.

D

(Distinction)

Provides evidence of integration and evaluation of critical ideas, principles and theories, distinctive insight and ability in applying relevant skills and concepts in relation to learning outcomes. There is demonstration of frequent originality in defining and analysing issues or problems and providing solutions; and the use of means of communication appropriate to the discipline and the audience.

Cr

(Credit)

Provides evidence of learning that goes beyond replication of content knowledge or skills relevant to the learning outcomes. There is demonstration of substantial understanding of fundamental concepts in the field of study and the ability to apply these concepts in a variety of contexts; convincing argumentation with appropriate coherent justification; communication of ideas fluently and clearly in terms of the conventions of the discipline.

P

(Pass).

Provides sufficient evidence of the achievement of learning outcomes. There is demonstration of understanding and application of fundamental concepts of the field of study; routine argumentation with acceptable justification; communication of information and ideas adequately in terms of the conventions of the discipline. The learning attainment is considered satisfactory or adequate or competent or capable in relation to the specified outcomes

F

(Fail)

Does not provide evidence of attainment of learning outcomes. There is missing or partial or superficial or faulty understanding and application of the fundamental concepts in the field of study; missing, undeveloped, inappropriate or confusing argumentation; incomplete, confusing or lacking communication of ideas in ways that give little attention to the conventions of the discipline.

 

NOTE: Numerical marks will NOT be awarded for individual assessment tasks.

In this unit, all tasks will be reported by GRADES.

Marks are only shown for your final reported grade for this Unit.

 

Appeals against grades

University regulations allow for students to appeal a unit grade if they feel they have been disadvantaged.

Grading appeals can be lodged on the following grounds:

  • a clerical error occurred in the determination of a final grade
  • the Unit Guide was not in accordance with the Unit Guide Policy
  • due regard was not paid to an illness or misadventure that had been found to be eligible for special consideration
  • the student had been disadvantaged in some way due to the conduct of an assessment task
  • the student had been disadvantaged by variation of the assessment requirements or feedback provisions laid out in the Unit Guide
  • the assessor’s judgement was not objectively applied.

Further information regarding the relevant policy and procedures can be found on the University's Policy Central website:

http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/index.html

 

14.Student Support Services

Student services: Ask MQ  ask.mq.edu.au/

Online service for student enquiries and requests: all questions/forms can be submitted through this address.

Please use this service for the submission of all requests for special considerations, extensions etc.

 

Study Skills Support Unit

Assistance is provided through a range of programs for students.

Services include study skills Tutorials and individual consultations, as well as useful online resources. Free academic writing programs are also offered.

http://www.students.mq.edu.au/support/learning_skills

UniWISE: http://www.students.mq.edu.au/support/learning_skills/undergraduate/uniwise

An iLearn resource specifically designed to help Undergraduate students develop their Academic writing and learning skills.

Student Wellbeing

Macquarie University provides a range of Academic Student Support Services. Details of these services can be accessed at http://www.student.mq.edu.au.

Disruption to Study Policy

The University is committed to equity and fairness in all aspects of its learning and teaching. In stating this commitment, the University recognises that there may be circumstances where a student is prevented by unavoidable disruption from performing in accordance with their ability. This policy supports students who experience serious and unavoidable disruption such that they do not reach their usual demonstrated performance level.  Please see:

http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/exams/disruption_to_studies/

Advice for students with disabilities/ health conditions

The Disability Support Unit provides support and assistance to students with a disability/ health condition to enable them to achieve their academic potential. Service provision is tailored to individual need following an interview and the provision of supporting documentation.

Disability Support Unit ph 9850 7497          Email: campuswellbeing@mq.edu.au         

In person: Level 2, Lincoln Building (C8A).  Website: http://students.mq.edu.au/campus_life/campus_wellbeing_support_services/disability_service/

Students with disability/health condition need to register with Campus Wellbeing throughhttps://ask.mq.edu.au/account/forms/display/wellbeing_registration 

and the Advice of Disability/Health Condition form can be downloaded from http://students.mq.edu.au/support/health_and_wellbeing/disability_service/how_to_register/

Word document download link: http://students.mq.edu.au/public/download.jsp?id=267138

PDF document download link: http://students.mq.edu.au/public/download.jsp?id=267008

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
1. Service Folder for Families 40% 24th August
Family Case Study 60% 12th October

1. Service Folder for Families

Due: 24th August
Weighting: 40%

Collect information about five services for families, providing a one page overview of each service. This includes a rationale for their selection of the 5 services as well as an integrated critique of the strengths and weaknesses of each service. They then choose a family type from a diverse background, e.g. same-sex family, single-parent family, blended family, Indigenous family, family from a culturally or linguistically diverse background and draft a set of interview questions for the target family. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Develop an understanding of the broad theoretical approaches to the study of children and families, including ecological theory, family systems theory, life cycle approaches, and theories of risk and resilience.
  • 2. Identify the importance of understanding children and families within particular social, linguistic and cultural contexts, and demonstrate sensitivity to diverse perspectives, abilities and cultural ways of knowing.
  • 3. Have a detailed knowledge of contemporary issues concerning children and families, including such things as divorce, the role of the extended family, poverty, child abuse and neglect, substitute care and community violence.
  • 4. Develop an understanding of the unique learning requirements of children from a range of backgrounds and consider how best to accommodate this within different learning environments.
  • 5. Identify and evaluate the range of formal and informal supports available to families with young children as well as factors that enhance connections between families and schools/childcare centres/preschools.

Family Case Study

Due: 12th October
Weighting: 60%

Pre-service teachers conduct an interview with a target family from a diverse background (e.g. same-sex family, single-parent family, blended family, Indigenous family, family from a culturally or linguistically diverse background). They then use the interview in combination with relevant research to write up a detailed case study on the family. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 3. Have a detailed knowledge of contemporary issues concerning children and families, including such things as divorce, the role of the extended family, poverty, child abuse and neglect, substitute care and community violence.
  • 4. Develop an understanding of the unique learning requirements of children from a range of backgrounds and consider how best to accommodate this within different learning environments.
  • 5. Identify and evaluate the range of formal and informal supports available to families with young children as well as factors that enhance connections between families and schools/childcare centres/preschools.
  • 6. Be able to find relevant information about families, communities and early childhood services from a range of sources including the library, newspapers and electronic sources.
  • 7. Identify bias, differences between fact and opinion and omissions in information; consider information from a variety of perspectives; as well as the usefulness, accuracy, reliability and validity of information.

Delivery and Resources

Internal Delivery:

This unit is taught weekly with a 1 hr lecture (also recorded) and 2 hour tutorial. This includes weekly readings prior to attending the lecture and tutorial. Copies of the lecture slides are available in advance of lectures from the University’s iLearn website for UNIT ECH326.

Students are required to participate in small group activities, whole class discussion, to read the weekly material in advance, and to complete brief tasks either as individuals or in pairs. 

External Delivery

This unit has a weekly 1 hr lecture (also recorded). This includes weekly readings prior to listening to the lecture. Copies of the lecture slides are available in advance of lectures from the University’s iLearn website for UNIT ECH326.

Students are required to participate in group discussions online (in iLearn) during the semester and attend and participate two on campus days (25th and 26th September) .

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 5. Identify and evaluate the range of formal and informal supports available to families with young children as well as factors that enhance connections between families and schools/childcare centres/preschools.
  • 6. Be able to find relevant information about families, communities and early childhood services from a range of sources including the library, newspapers and electronic sources.
  • 7. Identify bias, differences between fact and opinion and omissions in information; consider information from a variety of perspectives; as well as the usefulness, accuracy, reliability and validity of information.

Assessment tasks

  • 1. Service Folder for Families
  • Family Case Study

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 5. Identify and evaluate the range of formal and informal supports available to families with young children as well as factors that enhance connections between families and schools/childcare centres/preschools.
  • 6. Be able to find relevant information about families, communities and early childhood services from a range of sources including the library, newspapers and electronic sources.
  • 7. Identify bias, differences between fact and opinion and omissions in information; consider information from a variety of perspectives; as well as the usefulness, accuracy, reliability and validity of information.

Assessment tasks

  • 1. Service Folder for Families
  • Family Case Study

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. Develop an understanding of the broad theoretical approaches to the study of children and families, including ecological theory, family systems theory, life cycle approaches, and theories of risk and resilience.
  • 2. Identify the importance of understanding children and families within particular social, linguistic and cultural contexts, and demonstrate sensitivity to diverse perspectives, abilities and cultural ways of knowing.
  • 3. Have a detailed knowledge of contemporary issues concerning children and families, including such things as divorce, the role of the extended family, poverty, child abuse and neglect, substitute care and community violence.
  • 4. Develop an understanding of the unique learning requirements of children from a range of backgrounds and consider how best to accommodate this within different learning environments.
  • 5. Identify and evaluate the range of formal and informal supports available to families with young children as well as factors that enhance connections between families and schools/childcare centres/preschools.

Assessment tasks

  • 1. Service Folder for Families
  • Family Case Study

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. Develop an understanding of the broad theoretical approaches to the study of children and families, including ecological theory, family systems theory, life cycle approaches, and theories of risk and resilience.
  • 2. Identify the importance of understanding children and families within particular social, linguistic and cultural contexts, and demonstrate sensitivity to diverse perspectives, abilities and cultural ways of knowing.
  • 3. Have a detailed knowledge of contemporary issues concerning children and families, including such things as divorce, the role of the extended family, poverty, child abuse and neglect, substitute care and community violence.
  • 4. Develop an understanding of the unique learning requirements of children from a range of backgrounds and consider how best to accommodate this within different learning environments.
  • 5. Identify and evaluate the range of formal and informal supports available to families with young children as well as factors that enhance connections between families and schools/childcare centres/preschools.
  • 7. Identify bias, differences between fact and opinion and omissions in information; consider information from a variety of perspectives; as well as the usefulness, accuracy, reliability and validity of information.

Assessment tasks

  • 1. Service Folder for Families
  • Family Case Study

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • 1. Develop an understanding of the broad theoretical approaches to the study of children and families, including ecological theory, family systems theory, life cycle approaches, and theories of risk and resilience.
  • 2. Identify the importance of understanding children and families within particular social, linguistic and cultural contexts, and demonstrate sensitivity to diverse perspectives, abilities and cultural ways of knowing.
  • 3. Have a detailed knowledge of contemporary issues concerning children and families, including such things as divorce, the role of the extended family, poverty, child abuse and neglect, substitute care and community violence.
  • 4. Develop an understanding of the unique learning requirements of children from a range of backgrounds and consider how best to accommodate this within different learning environments.
  • 7. Identify bias, differences between fact and opinion and omissions in information; consider information from a variety of perspectives; as well as the usefulness, accuracy, reliability and validity of information.

Assessment task

  • 1. Service Folder for Families

Changes since First Published

Date Description
26/07/2017 The oncampus days were incorrect in the previous version