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PICT210 – Intelligence and Counter Intelligence

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor
Fred Smith
Contact via (02) 9850 1442
Building Y3A, Level 2
By Appointment
Tutor
Jon Cottam
By Appointment
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
PICT102 or PICT111 or PICT110
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit provides an introduction to the fields of intelligence and counterintelligence. It focuses on the strategic, tactical and operational levels of national security, as well as the role of law enforcement and intelligence organisations in protecting the state from domestic and foreign threats. Students will gain a deep understanding of the history of intelligence, the key intelligence agencies in Australia, the intelligence cycle and its application, and the interplay between policing and intelligence. Students will engage with key case studies from around the world to further understand these issues and dynamics. The unit complements PICT211, which focuses on government strategies for ensuring national security.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify key agencies and functions in Australia’s national security community.
  2. Analyze and explain the various public sector law enforcement and intelligence roles which contribute to homeland security.
  3. Critically assess the integration of surveillance, intelligence and law enforcement in protecting the state from threats and vulnerabilities.
  4. Identify and debate challenges to relationship building between sectors relevant to national security at the operational and strategic levels.
  5. Assess homeland security issues from government, private sector and societal perspectives.
  6. Make judgments on the strategic and operational needs of intelligence and law enforcement agencies in relation to legal, ethical and policy constraints.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Analytical Report (AT1) 30% 2 April 2017 by 11:59pm
Research Essay (AT2) 40% 14 May 2017 by 11:59pm
Take Home Exam (AT3) 30% 11 June 2017 by 11:59pm

Analytical Report (AT1)

Due: 2 April 2017 by 11:59pm
Weighting: 30%

See iLearn for details


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key agencies and functions in Australia’s national security community.
  • Analyze and explain the various public sector law enforcement and intelligence roles which contribute to homeland security.
  • Critically assess the integration of surveillance, intelligence and law enforcement in protecting the state from threats and vulnerabilities.
  • Identify and debate challenges to relationship building between sectors relevant to national security at the operational and strategic levels.
  • Assess homeland security issues from government, private sector and societal perspectives.
  • Make judgments on the strategic and operational needs of intelligence and law enforcement agencies in relation to legal, ethical and policy constraints.

Research Essay (AT2)

Due: 14 May 2017 by 11:59pm
Weighting: 40%

See iLearn for details


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key agencies and functions in Australia’s national security community.
  • Analyze and explain the various public sector law enforcement and intelligence roles which contribute to homeland security.
  • Critically assess the integration of surveillance, intelligence and law enforcement in protecting the state from threats and vulnerabilities.
  • Identify and debate challenges to relationship building between sectors relevant to national security at the operational and strategic levels.
  • Assess homeland security issues from government, private sector and societal perspectives.
  • Make judgments on the strategic and operational needs of intelligence and law enforcement agencies in relation to legal, ethical and policy constraints.

Take Home Exam (AT3)

Due: 11 June 2017 by 11:59pm
Weighting: 30%

See iLearn for details


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify key agencies and functions in Australia’s national security community.
  • Analyze and explain the various public sector law enforcement and intelligence roles which contribute to homeland security.
  • Critically assess the integration of surveillance, intelligence and law enforcement in protecting the state from threats and vulnerabilities.
  • Identify and debate challenges to relationship building between sectors relevant to national security at the operational and strategic levels.
  • Assess homeland security issues from government, private sector and societal perspectives.
  • Make judgments on the strategic and operational needs of intelligence and law enforcement agencies in relation to legal, ethical and policy constraints.

Delivery and Resources

DELIVERY AND RESOURCES

UNIT REQUIREMENTS AND EXPECTATIONS

  • You should spend an average of 12 hours per week on this unit. This includes listening to lectures prior to seminar or tutorial, reading weekly required materials as detailed in iLearn, participating in Ilearn discussion forums and preparing assessments.
  • Internal students are expected to attend all seminar or tutorial sessions, and external students are expected to make significant contributions to on-line activities.
  • In most cases students are required to attempt and submit all major assessment tasks in order to pass the unit.

REQUIRED READINGS

  • The citations for all the required readings for this unit are available to enrolled students through the unit iLearn site, and at Macquarie University's library site.  Electronic copies of required readings may be accessed through the library or will be made available by other means.

TECHNOLOGY USED AND REQUIRED

  • Computer and internet access are essential for this unit. Basic computer skills and skills in word processing are also a requirement.
  • This unit has an online presence. Login is via: https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/
  • Students are required to have regular access to a computer and the internet. Mobile devices alone are not sufficient.
  • Information about IT used at Macquarie University is available at  http://students.mq.edu.au/it_services/

SUBMITTING ASSESSMENT TASKS

  • All text-based assessment tasks are to be submitted, marked and returned electronically.  This will only happen through the unit iLearn site. 
  • Assessment tasks must be submitted as a MS word document by the due date.
  • Most assessment tasks will be subject to a 'TurnitIn' review as an automatic part of the submission process.
  • The granting of extensions is subject to the university’s Disruptions Policy. Extensions will not in normal circumstances be granted by unit conveners or tutors, but must be lodged through Disruption to Study: http://www.students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/manage_your_study_program/disruption_to_studies/.

LATE SUBMISSION OF ASSESSMENT TASKS

  • If an assignment is submitted late, 5% of the available mark will be deducted for each day (including weekends) the paper is late.
  • For example, if a paper is worth 20 marks, 1 mark will be deducted from the grade given for each day that it is late (i.e. a student given 15/20 who submitted 4 days late will lose 4 marks = 11/20).
  • The same principle applies if an extension is granted and the assignment is submitted later than the amended date.

WORD LIMITS FOR ASSESSMENT TASKS

  • Stated word limits include footnotes and footnoted references, but not bibliography, or title page.
  • Word limits can generally deviate by 10% either over or under the stated figure.
  • If the number of words exceeds the limit by more than 10%, then penalties will apply. These penalties are 5% of the awarded mark for every 100 words over the word limit. If a paper is 300 words over, for instance, it will lose 3 x 5% = 15% of the total mark awarded for the assignment. This percentage is taken off the total mark, i.e. if a paper was graded at a credit (65%) and was 300 words over, it would be reduced by 15 marks to a pass (50%).
  • The application of this penalty is at the discretion of the course convener.

REASSESSMENT OF ASSIGNMENTS DURING THE SEMESTER

  • Macquarie University operates a Grade Appeal Policy in cases where students feel their work was graded inappropriately: http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html
  • Conformably to the Grade Appeal Policy, individual works are not subject to regrading.

STAFF AVAILABILITY

  • Department staff will endeavor to answer student enquiries in a timely manner. However, emails or iLearn messages will not usually be answered over the weekend or public holiday period.
  • Students are encouraged to read the Unit Guide and look at instructions posted on the iLearn site before sending email requests to staff.

Unit Schedule

Week 1.  Introduction: Course Administration; What is Intelligence & Why it matters

Week 2.  History of Intelligence: Part 1

Week 3.  History of Intelligence: Part 2

Week 4:  The Australian Intelligence Community

Week 5.  The Intelligence Cycle & Intelligence Analytical Processes

Week 6.  Security Threats – Australia & the Indo-Asia-Pacific Arena

Week 7.  Case Study:  The Role of Intelligence in Domestic Security -- The Boston Marathon Bombing

Week 8.  Socio-cultural Dynamics and the Intelligence Community

Week 9.  Domestic Security:  Policing, Detention & Regulatory Intelligence

Week 10. Foreign & Domestic Security:  Defence, Counter-Insurgency (COIN) & Counter-Terrorism (CT), Force Protection (FP) & Physical Security Intelligence

Week 11.  Law Enforcement Models and Law Enforcement Use of Intelligence

Week 12.  Maritime Security – Understanding the Maritime Domain

Week 13.  Ethics, Oversight and the Intelligence Community

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critically assess the integration of surveillance, intelligence and law enforcement in protecting the state from threats and vulnerabilities.
  • Identify and debate challenges to relationship building between sectors relevant to national security at the operational and strategic levels.
  • Assess homeland security issues from government, private sector and societal perspectives.
  • Make judgments on the strategic and operational needs of intelligence and law enforcement agencies in relation to legal, ethical and policy constraints.

Assessment tasks

  • Analytical Report (AT1)
  • Research Essay (AT2)
  • Take Home Exam (AT3)

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key agencies and functions in Australia’s national security community.
  • Analyze and explain the various public sector law enforcement and intelligence roles which contribute to homeland security.
  • Critically assess the integration of surveillance, intelligence and law enforcement in protecting the state from threats and vulnerabilities.
  • Identify and debate challenges to relationship building between sectors relevant to national security at the operational and strategic levels.
  • Assess homeland security issues from government, private sector and societal perspectives.
  • Make judgments on the strategic and operational needs of intelligence and law enforcement agencies in relation to legal, ethical and policy constraints.

Assessment tasks

  • Analytical Report (AT1)
  • Research Essay (AT2)
  • Take Home Exam (AT3)

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key agencies and functions in Australia’s national security community.
  • Analyze and explain the various public sector law enforcement and intelligence roles which contribute to homeland security.
  • Assess homeland security issues from government, private sector and societal perspectives.

Assessment tasks

  • Analytical Report (AT1)
  • Research Essay (AT2)
  • Take Home Exam (AT3)

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key agencies and functions in Australia’s national security community.
  • Analyze and explain the various public sector law enforcement and intelligence roles which contribute to homeland security.
  • Critically assess the integration of surveillance, intelligence and law enforcement in protecting the state from threats and vulnerabilities.
  • Identify and debate challenges to relationship building between sectors relevant to national security at the operational and strategic levels.
  • Assess homeland security issues from government, private sector and societal perspectives.
  • Make judgments on the strategic and operational needs of intelligence and law enforcement agencies in relation to legal, ethical and policy constraints.

Assessment tasks

  • Analytical Report (AT1)
  • Research Essay (AT2)
  • Take Home Exam (AT3)

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify key agencies and functions in Australia’s national security community.
  • Analyze and explain the various public sector law enforcement and intelligence roles which contribute to homeland security.
  • Critically assess the integration of surveillance, intelligence and law enforcement in protecting the state from threats and vulnerabilities.
  • Identify and debate challenges to relationship building between sectors relevant to national security at the operational and strategic levels.
  • Assess homeland security issues from government, private sector and societal perspectives.
  • Make judgments on the strategic and operational needs of intelligence and law enforcement agencies in relation to legal, ethical and policy constraints.

Assessment tasks

  • Analytical Report (AT1)
  • Research Essay (AT2)
  • Take Home Exam (AT3)

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critically assess the integration of surveillance, intelligence and law enforcement in protecting the state from threats and vulnerabilities.
  • Identify and debate challenges to relationship building between sectors relevant to national security at the operational and strategic levels.
  • Assess homeland security issues from government, private sector and societal perspectives.
  • Make judgments on the strategic and operational needs of intelligence and law enforcement agencies in relation to legal, ethical and policy constraints.

Assessment tasks

  • Analytical Report (AT1)
  • Research Essay (AT2)
  • Take Home Exam (AT3)

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyze and explain the various public sector law enforcement and intelligence roles which contribute to homeland security.
  • Critically assess the integration of surveillance, intelligence and law enforcement in protecting the state from threats and vulnerabilities.
  • Identify and debate challenges to relationship building between sectors relevant to national security at the operational and strategic levels.
  • Assess homeland security issues from government, private sector and societal perspectives.
  • Make judgments on the strategic and operational needs of intelligence and law enforcement agencies in relation to legal, ethical and policy constraints.

Assessment tasks

  • Analytical Report (AT1)
  • Research Essay (AT2)
  • Take Home Exam (AT3)

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyze and explain the various public sector law enforcement and intelligence roles which contribute to homeland security.
  • Identify and debate challenges to relationship building between sectors relevant to national security at the operational and strategic levels.
  • Assess homeland security issues from government, private sector and societal perspectives.

Assessment tasks

  • Analytical Report (AT1)
  • Research Essay (AT2)
  • Take Home Exam (AT3)

Changes from Previous Offering

The Unit Schedule has been modified.

Changes since First Published

Date Description
18/01/2017 Delivery and Resources section updated, as well as the Unit Schedule