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PSY 463 – Advanced Visual Perception

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Kevin Brooks
Contact via kevin.brooks@mq.edu.au
C4A 405
By Appointment
Co-convenor
Eugene Chekaluk
Contact via eugene.chekaluk@mq.edu.au
C3A 527
By Appointment
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
PSY490 or PSY495
Co-badged status Co-badged status
PSYC763 Advanced Visual Perception
Unit description Unit description
The area of visual perception is a rapidly changing one. The purpose of this unit is to deal with recent and interesting developments in the area of visual perception by meeting weekly for lively seminars to critically evaluate recent papers on issues of interest to the group. An essential component will evaluate intervention strategies for certain visual disorders based upon the results of basic perception research. The particular content will vary from year to year, depending upon the state of the discipline at the time. All students must present at least once and submit a summary for assessment. In addition, staff and postgraduate students will present their own current research to students.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. • identify, define and demonstrate an understanding of the key terms and processes in Perception • discuss key theories and research in Perception • locate, identify and demonstrate an understanding of the function of key structures in the physiology of human sensory systems • explain the cause of many different perceptual phenomena in terms of perceptual and physiological processes and principles
  2. • understand the difference between the “real” world (what is) and the “phenomenological” world (what seems to be) • apply perceptual and physiological principles to understanding the phenomenological world • critically evaluate designs and analyses in perceptual psychology • interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions • critically evaluate perceptual theories and arguments • review and critique literature on Perception • competently use information technology applications e.g. e-mail, web-browsers, etc.
  3. • select an appropriate design and methodology for the measurement of perceptual phenomena • apply knowledge to solving problems and evaluating ideas and information • describe and interpret data presented in graphical form • competently access, use and synthesise information
  4. • display creative thinking skills • develop new ideas and theories and construct cohesive arguments • present ideas in new and creative ways • consider problems from new perspectives
  5. • demonstrate effective writing skills • display effective discussion skills • express ideas with clarity and concision • communicate complex ideas simply • present information in a coherent and integrated way
  6. • apply and adapt knowledge to the real world • recognise the strengths and limitations of Perception in gathering “facts” • present a convincing argument for the importance of the study of Perception • present a balanced critical view of Perception • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with infants and children • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with animals • reflect on how perception may influence your opinions or beliefs
  7. • demonstrate effective time management and work organisation skills • assess your own learning against a set of pre-selected criteria • reflect on how you have analysed information and solved problems, and incorporate lessons learnt into future work

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Essay 50% 9am Mon 22nd May
Presentation 25% Various
Peer Feedback 10% Various
Seminar Contributions 15% Various

Essay

Due: 9am Mon 22nd May
Weighting: 50%

Each student is required to submit an essay on a topic of interest in the field of visual perception.

The topic of this essay should be formally agreed with the Unit Convenors. Students should send a proposed title or topic by e-mail, along with a .pdf copy of at least one principal reference to the convenor for approval. To avoid wasting time on a topic that may not be approved, it is recommended that students do not begin writing this essay until formal approval has been given. The total word count, including everything except the references should not exceed 2,500 words. The proposal should be submitted to Turnitin, on the PSY463 iLearn Site by the due date.

Assignments will be penalised by 5% per day late. Fractions of a day are rounded up. Assignments over the word limit will be marked based on the first 2500 words only. Penalties for plagiarism or other forms of academic misconduct will be strictly applied.

Ordinarily, no extensions of time for submission of written work will be granted since ample time for preparation will have been given. If an extension is required for medical or other extenuating circumstances, students may request this in writing through ask.mq.edu.au with supporting documentary evidence (such as medical certificate, counsellor note, or similar). The Psychology Honours Coordinator (Donna Keeley) will make all decisions regarding extensions. Neither individual tutors nor the course convenor will grant extensions. All requests for extensions must be made prior to the due date for the assignment. If an extension is granted, the approval must be attached to the assignment to avoid any late penalty.

 

Submission Information

You must submit your essay through Turnitin for the purpose of plagiarism detection. The link for submission can be found on the iLearn page.

A digital receipt will be generated. Please save a copy of it.

Although unlikely, should you experience any technical difficulties when submitting your assignment online, an identical copy of the FULL assignment should be emailed to the Unit Convenors while the problem is reviewed. Failure to do so will result in late penalties being applied where the assignment deadline is exceeded.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • • identify, define and demonstrate an understanding of the key terms and processes in Perception • discuss key theories and research in Perception • locate, identify and demonstrate an understanding of the function of key structures in the physiology of human sensory systems • explain the cause of many different perceptual phenomena in terms of perceptual and physiological processes and principles
  • • understand the difference between the “real” world (what is) and the “phenomenological” world (what seems to be) • apply perceptual and physiological principles to understanding the phenomenological world • critically evaluate designs and analyses in perceptual psychology • interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions • critically evaluate perceptual theories and arguments • review and critique literature on Perception • competently use information technology applications e.g. e-mail, web-browsers, etc.
  • • select an appropriate design and methodology for the measurement of perceptual phenomena • apply knowledge to solving problems and evaluating ideas and information • describe and interpret data presented in graphical form • competently access, use and synthesise information
  • • display creative thinking skills • develop new ideas and theories and construct cohesive arguments • present ideas in new and creative ways • consider problems from new perspectives
  • • demonstrate effective writing skills • display effective discussion skills • express ideas with clarity and concision • communicate complex ideas simply • present information in a coherent and integrated way
  • • apply and adapt knowledge to the real world • recognise the strengths and limitations of Perception in gathering “facts” • present a convincing argument for the importance of the study of Perception • present a balanced critical view of Perception • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with infants and children • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with animals • reflect on how perception may influence your opinions or beliefs
  • • demonstrate effective time management and work organisation skills • assess your own learning against a set of pre-selected criteria • reflect on how you have analysed information and solved problems, and incorporate lessons learnt into future work

Presentation

Due: Various
Weighting: 25%

Each student must make at least one presentation during the semester. The topic of this presentation should be one of the pre-approved journal articles distributed at the beginning of semester, or a personally selected journal article, if this is explicitly approved by the Unit Convenors via e-mail.

In addition, the presenter must send to the Unit Convenors, via e-mail, the slides used during the presentation. These are due one week after the date of the presentation.

The mark will be determined by factors such as clear evidence of understanding of the main issues, clarity of explanation, critical analysis, comprehension of the implications for the theories of visual perception or real-world applications, suggestions for future research, etc. Both the slides and the oral presentation will contribute to the grade.

When a student makes more than one presentation during the semester, the highest scoring presentation will be used in the calculation of the final unit grade.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • • identify, define and demonstrate an understanding of the key terms and processes in Perception • discuss key theories and research in Perception • locate, identify and demonstrate an understanding of the function of key structures in the physiology of human sensory systems • explain the cause of many different perceptual phenomena in terms of perceptual and physiological processes and principles
  • • understand the difference between the “real” world (what is) and the “phenomenological” world (what seems to be) • apply perceptual and physiological principles to understanding the phenomenological world • critically evaluate designs and analyses in perceptual psychology • interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions • critically evaluate perceptual theories and arguments • review and critique literature on Perception • competently use information technology applications e.g. e-mail, web-browsers, etc.
  • • select an appropriate design and methodology for the measurement of perceptual phenomena • apply knowledge to solving problems and evaluating ideas and information • describe and interpret data presented in graphical form • competently access, use and synthesise information
  • • display creative thinking skills • develop new ideas and theories and construct cohesive arguments • present ideas in new and creative ways • consider problems from new perspectives
  • • demonstrate effective writing skills • display effective discussion skills • express ideas with clarity and concision • communicate complex ideas simply • present information in a coherent and integrated way
  • • apply and adapt knowledge to the real world • recognise the strengths and limitations of Perception in gathering “facts” • present a convincing argument for the importance of the study of Perception • present a balanced critical view of Perception • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with infants and children • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with animals • reflect on how perception may influence your opinions or beliefs
  • • demonstrate effective time management and work organisation skills • assess your own learning against a set of pre-selected criteria • reflect on how you have analysed information and solved problems, and incorporate lessons learnt into future work

Peer Feedback

Due: Various
Weighting: 10%

Each week, students not making a formal oral presentation will be required to provide feedback to the speaker. This must be e-mailed to the Unit Convenors within 1 week of the presentation. The Convenors will collate the feedback and remove the names of the contributors before forwarding to the presenter.

The focus of the feedback should be to help the presenter to improve their technique for future presentations. Comments should be concise, professional and impersonal, identifying 3 positive aspects of the presentation 3 areas for improvement. Inappropriate and excessively personal comments will not be forwarded to the speaker, and action will be taken if necessary.

Absences from class will affect the student's score on this assessment task. For this reason, attendance is compulsory. In case of unavoidable absence (for example, due to illness) an application for Disruption to Studies should be submitted through ask.mq.edu with the appropriate supporting documents. Original documents need to be presented at the Student Centre. This should be done within five (5) working days from the day of the absence.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • • identify, define and demonstrate an understanding of the key terms and processes in Perception • discuss key theories and research in Perception • locate, identify and demonstrate an understanding of the function of key structures in the physiology of human sensory systems • explain the cause of many different perceptual phenomena in terms of perceptual and physiological processes and principles
  • • understand the difference between the “real” world (what is) and the “phenomenological” world (what seems to be) • apply perceptual and physiological principles to understanding the phenomenological world • critically evaluate designs and analyses in perceptual psychology • interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions • critically evaluate perceptual theories and arguments • review and critique literature on Perception • competently use information technology applications e.g. e-mail, web-browsers, etc.
  • • select an appropriate design and methodology for the measurement of perceptual phenomena • apply knowledge to solving problems and evaluating ideas and information • describe and interpret data presented in graphical form • competently access, use and synthesise information
  • • display creative thinking skills • develop new ideas and theories and construct cohesive arguments • present ideas in new and creative ways • consider problems from new perspectives
  • • demonstrate effective writing skills • display effective discussion skills • express ideas with clarity and concision • communicate complex ideas simply • present information in a coherent and integrated way
  • • apply and adapt knowledge to the real world • recognise the strengths and limitations of Perception in gathering “facts” • present a convincing argument for the importance of the study of Perception • present a balanced critical view of Perception • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with infants and children • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with animals • reflect on how perception may influence your opinions or beliefs
  • • demonstrate effective time management and work organisation skills • assess your own learning against a set of pre-selected criteria • reflect on how you have analysed information and solved problems, and incorporate lessons learnt into future work

Seminar Contributions

Due: Various
Weighting: 15%

For each of the weekly seminars, all students are expected to have read the relevant journal article(s), and to contribute to discussion in class. The contributions of each student to in-class discussions will be judged by the members of staff present, and will constitute the grade for this assessment task.

Absences from class will affect the student's score on this assessment task. For this reason, attendance is compulsory. In case of unavoidable absence (for example, due to illness) an application for Disruption to Studies should be submitted through ask.mq.edu with the appropriate supporting documents. Original documents need to be presented at the Student Centre. This should be done within five (5) working days from the day of the absence.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • • identify, define and demonstrate an understanding of the key terms and processes in Perception • discuss key theories and research in Perception • locate, identify and demonstrate an understanding of the function of key structures in the physiology of human sensory systems • explain the cause of many different perceptual phenomena in terms of perceptual and physiological processes and principles
  • • understand the difference between the “real” world (what is) and the “phenomenological” world (what seems to be) • apply perceptual and physiological principles to understanding the phenomenological world • critically evaluate designs and analyses in perceptual psychology • interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions • critically evaluate perceptual theories and arguments • review and critique literature on Perception • competently use information technology applications e.g. e-mail, web-browsers, etc.
  • • select an appropriate design and methodology for the measurement of perceptual phenomena • apply knowledge to solving problems and evaluating ideas and information • describe and interpret data presented in graphical form • competently access, use and synthesise information
  • • display creative thinking skills • develop new ideas and theories and construct cohesive arguments • present ideas in new and creative ways • consider problems from new perspectives
  • • demonstrate effective writing skills • display effective discussion skills • express ideas with clarity and concision • communicate complex ideas simply • present information in a coherent and integrated way
  • • apply and adapt knowledge to the real world • recognise the strengths and limitations of Perception in gathering “facts” • present a convincing argument for the importance of the study of Perception • present a balanced critical view of Perception • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with infants and children • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with animals • reflect on how perception may influence your opinions or beliefs
  • • demonstrate effective time management and work organisation skills • assess your own learning against a set of pre-selected criteria • reflect on how you have analysed information and solved problems, and incorporate lessons learnt into future work

Delivery and Resources

 

Technology Used and Required

For this unit you will need to have access to a computer that can reliably connect to the internet. This will be essential for accessing your student e-mail account - the principal medium for organisation of this unit - and for accessing the unit's iLearn page, which can be found at:

https://ilearn.mq.edu.au

NB: It is University Policy that the University-issued e-mail account will be used for official University communication. All students are required to access their University account frequently.

 

Required Text

No required text. PDF files of relevant papers will be provided.

 

Unit Schedule

 

The timetable for classes can be found on the University web site at: http://www.timetables.mq.edu.au/ 

 

Seminars

Weekly seminars will have a "Journal Club Meeting" style, and will be held on Fridays from 2-4pm in W6B 336.

You should be aware that as your performance during these seminars will form a part of your assessment activities, your attendance is essential.   

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • • identify, define and demonstrate an understanding of the key terms and processes in Perception • discuss key theories and research in Perception • locate, identify and demonstrate an understanding of the function of key structures in the physiology of human sensory systems • explain the cause of many different perceptual phenomena in terms of perceptual and physiological processes and principles

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Presentation
  • Peer Feedback
  • Seminar Contributions

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • • understand the difference between the “real” world (what is) and the “phenomenological” world (what seems to be) • apply perceptual and physiological principles to understanding the phenomenological world • critically evaluate designs and analyses in perceptual psychology • interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions • critically evaluate perceptual theories and arguments • review and critique literature on Perception • competently use information technology applications e.g. e-mail, web-browsers, etc.

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Presentation
  • Peer Feedback
  • Seminar Contributions

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • • select an appropriate design and methodology for the measurement of perceptual phenomena • apply knowledge to solving problems and evaluating ideas and information • describe and interpret data presented in graphical form • competently access, use and synthesise information

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Presentation
  • Peer Feedback
  • Seminar Contributions

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • • display creative thinking skills • develop new ideas and theories and construct cohesive arguments • present ideas in new and creative ways • consider problems from new perspectives

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Presentation
  • Peer Feedback
  • Seminar Contributions

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • • demonstrate effective writing skills • display effective discussion skills • express ideas with clarity and concision • communicate complex ideas simply • present information in a coherent and integrated way

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Presentation
  • Peer Feedback
  • Seminar Contributions

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • • apply and adapt knowledge to the real world • recognise the strengths and limitations of Perception in gathering “facts” • present a convincing argument for the importance of the study of Perception • present a balanced critical view of Perception • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with infants and children • describe methodological and ethical challenges involved in research with animals • reflect on how perception may influence your opinions or beliefs

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Presentation
  • Peer Feedback
  • Seminar Contributions

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • • demonstrate effective time management and work organisation skills • assess your own learning against a set of pre-selected criteria • reflect on how you have analysed information and solved problems, and incorporate lessons learnt into future work

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Presentation
  • Peer Feedback
  • Seminar Contributions

Teaching Staff

 

Note that visits with any of the staff listed below is by appointment only.

 

Unit Convenor                            

Dr. Kevin Brooks, C3A 405, Tel: 9850 7796, email: kevin.brooks@mq.edu.au           

 

Other Lecturing Staff

Dr. Eugene Chekaluk, C3A 527, Tel: 9850 8009, email: eugene.chekaluk@mq.edu.au

Dr. Ian Stephen, C3B 612, Tel: 9850 8001, email:  ian.stephen@mq.edu.au

Teaching and Learning Strategy

 

PSY463 Unit Overview

While earlier units at 200- and 300-level were intended to introduce the fundamentals and basic concepts, PSY463 is designed to allow students to explore deeper issues in the rapidly changing field of vision science, alongside other interested students and more experienced academics. PSY463 aims to give students exposure to contemporary research in the field of visual perception, and to help them to develop advanced research skills, particularly those involving critical thinking, analysis and synthesis of empirical data, and oral and written presentation.

To this end, the course will be run as a series of "Journal Club" seminars, attended by all enrolled UG students as well as interested PG students and members of staff. In each seminar, a student or member of staff will give a presentation of a journal article of their choice (from a pre-approved list of options), as the starting point for a more detailed discussion by the rest of the class, each of whom will be expected to have read the relevant paper. Students wishing to make a presentation based on a paper outside the opions provided must seek approval from the Unit Convenor first. Each student must present at least once during the semester, and must hand in a copy of their slides for assessment. All students are scored on their contributions, both as presenters and as participants in the ensuing discussions. When the schedule allows, students may request feedback on the deisgn of their perception-related Honours projects, or members of staff may present their own current research. In previous years, these sessions have been social, lively and enjoyable for most of the students and staff members involved. Additional assessment activities involve a 2500-word essay (take-home exam) on a topic of the student's choosing, but different to the topic on which the presentation was based (approval of the Unit Convenor required), and the provision of feedback to peers.

 

Statement on Academic Courtesy

It is the right of each student to learn in an environment that is free of disruption and distraction. Please make an effort to arrive to class on time, and if you are unavoidably detained, please enter the room as quietly as possible to minimise disruption. Although some speakers may allow questions during their oral presentation, talking between students is often disruptive and is strongly discouraged. Phones, pagers, and other electronic devices that produce noise and other distractions must be turned off prior to entering class, and remain off for the duration of the seminar.

 

Statement on Social Inclusion and Diversity

Social inclusion at Macquarie University is about giving everyone who has the potential to benefit from higher education, the opportunity to study at university, participate in campus life and flourish in their chosen field. The University has made significant moves to promote an equitable, diverse and exciting campus community for the benefit of staff and students. It is your responsibility to contribute towards the development of an inclusive culture and practice in the areas of learning and teaching, research, and service orientation and delivery. As a member of the Macquarie University community, you must not discriminate against or harass others on the basis of their sex, gender, race, marital status, carers' responsibilities, disability, sexual preference, age, political conviction or religious belief. All lecturers, tutors and students are expected to display appropriate behaviour that is conducive to a healthy learning environment for everyone. The Unit Convenor is a member of the Ally Network and is happy to provide support to members of the GLBTIQ community.

Changes since First Published

Date Description
03/03/2017 Following consultation with and agreement of all enrolled students, due date for essay assignment has been updated to 9am Mon 22nd May.