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AHIS250 – From Ur to Babylon: A History of Israel from Abraham to the Babylonian Exile

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Lecturer
Louise Pryke
W6A 513
By appointment
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
12cp at 100 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit is a study of the traditions and history of the Israelite peoples from the foundation of the nation through the period of the monarchy to the catastrophic events of the early sixth century BCE. The Hebrew Bible and archaeological evidence are used as sources to reconstruct the history of the period, and to understand the theological responses to unfolding events. Critical scholarship is employed to interpret our historical sources.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Develop knowledge of the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age to the Iron II period
  2. Evaluate and use textual, literary, and archaeological evidence
  3. Demonstrate the ability to use libraries and the internet to gather resources for research
  4. Construct a best-fit hypothesis or argument using ancient and modern evidence
  5. Demonstrate critical thinking about the past to the present (and vice versa)
  6. Improve oral and written presentation
  7. Investigate biblical literary techniques and themes

General Assessment Information

1. Tutorial Paper:Students will write an 700 word paper, discussing the challenges and benefits involved in using archaeological, literary and historical sources for the exploration and study of Ancient Israel, and the Ancient Near East. Students will have the opportunity to workshop their responses in a tutorial prior to submission. The tutorial paper should be based on lecture and tutorial discussion, as well as on the course textbook; these materials may be referenced as required. Students may compare and contrast different approaches, or choose one type of evidence as a focus for their report. A short list of additional (optional) helpful bibliography will be provided on the iLearn website. Assignments must be submitted via the communicate privately with teaching staff link on the iLearn site, by 11:59PM on the due date (Thursday, Week 9).

The appropriate length of tutorial assignments should not exceed 700 words. The assignment should be structured as a mini essay. What is required are succinct, sharply-focussed and tightly expressed answers to the questions set. If modern scholarship is used, a bibliography should be attached (see Essay Presentation Guides on the Ancient History website at:

<http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/faculties_and_departments/faculty_of_arts/department_of_ancient_history/current_students/program_information/>.

To clarify, we will be assessing the degree to which you answer the question/s set (within the word limit), your ability to contrast and critically evaluate different approaches to studying Ancient Israel, your ability to build a persuasive argument, and the clarity of your presentation and written expression.

2. Essay: One essay, counting for 40% of the final mark, is required. It should not exceed 2000 words. IT IS DUE THURSDAY, WEEK 13.

Note you should always keep a copy of completed tasks in case of loss.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA FOR ESSAY

Essays will be judged for:

- Creativity, depth and originality of the results of the analysis

- Ability to interest the reader in the chosen topic

- Understanding of material

- Clarity of argument (including clear articulation of thesis)

- Critical thinking in the selection of ancient and modern sources, and in engagement with sources

- Range and quality of research

- Judgement

- Presentation of work (such as proof-reading, clear paragraph construction etc)

- Proper citation method and thoroughness of referencing

A rubric with grade descriptions will be placed on iLearn.

3. Weekly quizzes (1 per tutorial, worth 30%)

The tutorial quiz is based upon the reading from the textbook assigned for the week of the tutorial, as well as on lecture materials. The quiz will take the form of multiple choice and short answer questions.

4. Participation (worth 15%). The tutorial participation mark is a measure of the student’s overall regular contribution to classes and will be based on depth of discussion, demonstration of prior preparation (such as preparing the week's readings).

Important: The University Examination period in 2nd session 2017 is from 13th November to 1st of December.

Also Important: There is no formal examination for this unit.

Grading:

The grade a student receives will signify their overall performance in meeting the learning outcomes of the unit. Grades will not be awarded by reference to the achievement of other students nor allocated to fit a predetermined distribution. In determining a grade, due weight will be given to the learning outcomes and level of the unit. Markers in the unit will use the following grades:

HD = High Distinction 85--100

D = Distinction 75--84

Cr = Credit 65--74

P = Pass 50--64

F = Fail 0--49

Further information and description of grades and assessments can be found in the Macquarie University Policies and Procedures linked below, particularly the Assessment and Grading Policies.

Assignment Submission

ALL written assignments (tutorial paper, essay) must be submitted online through the AHIS250 iLearn site.

Return of marked work:

Staff will endeavour to return tutorial papers by the time of the next tutorial though this may not always be possible.

Staff will also endeavour to return essays by the end of session.

Over the course of AHIS250 students' work will be marked by at least two members of staff.

IF ANYTHING IS UNCLEAR, PLEASE ASK!

 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Essay 40% Thursday, Week 13
Weekly tutorial quiz 30% Ongoing
Tutorial paper 15% Thursday, Week 9
Participation 15% Continuous

Essay

Due: Thursday, Week 13
Weighting: 40%

Compulsory essay 2000 words

Note: There will be a lecture on how to write the major essay, and a tutorial will workshop the ideas discussed in the lecture.

Students will choose to answer in a 2000-word essay one of the following questions:

1. Do the literary, thematic, linguistic and other similarities in Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings justify speaking of them as a separate work: “The Deuteronomistic (or: Deuteronomic) History”? What difference does accepting/ rejecting this theory make for how we read these books?

2. What extra-biblical evidence do we have for the fall of the capital of the northern kingdom, Samaria, and the subsequent deportations of people?  Are the extra-biblical sources in harmony or conflict with the biblical accounts in 2 Kings 17:1-6, 24; 18:9-12?  How do the external sources enrich or modify our understanding of these events?

3. Much of the book of Kings is taken up with stories about the activities of prophets.  Examine the role of prophets in the book of Kings.  What does this tell us about the aims and interests of Kings?

4. How are the women in Judges 3-15 portrayed? To what extent might the portrayal reflect social reality?

5.Examine the biblical and non-biblical sources relating to the revolt of Mesha King of Moab (2 Kings chapter 3 [cf. 2 Chronicles 20] and the Mesha Stone [also known as “The Moabite Stone”]).  Discuss the relationship between the biblical and non-biblical sources in the context of debates on the historicity of the biblical texts.  

Bibliographies will be placed in iLearn


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Develop knowledge of the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age to the Iron II period
  • Evaluate and use textual, literary, and archaeological evidence
  • Demonstrate the ability to use libraries and the internet to gather resources for research
  • Construct a best-fit hypothesis or argument using ancient and modern evidence
  • Demonstrate critical thinking about the past to the present (and vice versa)
  • Improve oral and written presentation
  • Investigate biblical literary techniques and themes

Weekly tutorial quiz

Due: Ongoing
Weighting: 30%

In every tutorial, a short quiz will be taken to assess the students' knowledge of the reading from the unit textbook, as well as the week's lecture materials. Quizzes begin in the first tutorial (in Week 2).

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Develop knowledge of the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age to the Iron II period
  • Evaluate and use textual, literary, and archaeological evidence
  • Investigate biblical literary techniques and themes

Tutorial paper

Due: Thursday, Week 9
Weighting: 15%

Students will write an 700 word paper, discussing the challenges and benefits involved in using archaeological, literary and historical sources for the exploration and study of Ancient Israel, and the Ancient Near East. Students will have the opportunity to workshop their responses in a tutorial prior to submission.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Develop knowledge of the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age to the Iron II period
  • Evaluate and use textual, literary, and archaeological evidence
  • Demonstrate the ability to use libraries and the internet to gather resources for research
  • Construct a best-fit hypothesis or argument using ancient and modern evidence
  • Demonstrate critical thinking about the past to the present (and vice versa)
  • Improve oral and written presentation
  • Investigate biblical literary techniques and themes

Participation

Due: Continuous
Weighting: 15%

Students are continuously assessed on attendance, preparing the readings each week, degree of engagement in discussions and conversations, and for the thoughtfulness and depth of their input.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Develop knowledge of the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age to the Iron II period
  • Evaluate and use textual, literary, and archaeological evidence
  • Demonstrate the ability to use libraries and the internet to gather resources for research
  • Improve oral and written presentation

Delivery and Resources

For lecture times and classrooms please consult the MQ Timetable website: <http://www.timetables.mq.edu.au>. This website will display up-to-date information on your classes and classroom locations.

Lectures: There are two lectures a week for most weeks of the semester. The importance of regular attendance is that in the lectures we signal the topics we deem significant. It is these topics which will be assessed. All lectures will involve seminar-style class discussion.

Tutorials: There is one tutorial a week for most weeks of the semester. Participation in tutorial discussion is considered a vital and rewarding part of the unit, and should develop the concepts considered in lectures. Material from tutorials will be assessed.

Student Workload: In accordance with Senate Guidelines, a student workload of 3 hours per credit point (i.e., 9 hours per week for this 3-credit point unit) for 15 weeks (13 weeks of lectures + 2 weeks of recess) is expected.

Required Reading and Texts:

The set reading texts for the course are:

  • J. Maxwell Miller and John H. Hayes, A History of Ancient Israel and Judah (2nd ed.; Louisville/London: Westminster John Knox Press, 2006)
  • The Bible: The New Revised Standard Version (NRSV) is preferred due to it more literal approach to translation. You can either purchase a hard copy at a bookshop or access the texts online at http://www.biblegateway.com

In addition to the reading of the set texts, articles and book chapters will be placed in e-reserve or i-Learn and should also be read. The compulsory reading for the course will amount to:

  1. Bible: Genesis to 2 Kings (plus a number of other texts as specified);
  2. A History of Ancient Israel and Judah; and
  3. e-reserve and electronic journal articles.

Technology Used and Required

The unit has an iLearn page which can be accessed at: <https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/login/MQ/>. PC and internet access are therefore required. Basic computer skills (e.g., internet browsing) and skills in word processing are also a requirement. Please consult teaching staff for any further, more specific requirements.

Satisfactory Completion of Unit

In order to complete the unit satisfactorily students must gain a mark of 50% or more overall.

Unit Schedule

Week Week Starts Topic Bible

Chapter (Miller & Hayes)

1   Course introduction, Abrahamic narrative Genesis 11-25 1
2   Moses and law

Exodus 1-15, 32-4

2  
3   Joshua Joshua 1-11, 22-24 3
4   Judges Judges 2-21 4
5   Samuel & Saul (1025-1005BC) 1 Samuel 8-15 5
6   David (1005-970 BC) 1 Samuel 16 - 2 Samuel 24 6
7   Solomon (970-931 BC) and How to Write the Course Essay 1 Kings 1-11 7
Two Week Recess
8   Omride Dynasty (884-842 BC) 1 Kings 12 - 2 Kings 8:27 8 & 9
9   No lectures this week (please continue reading the textbook)   10
10   Jehu Dynasty (842-747 BC) 2 Kings 9:1-15:7 11
11   Assyria and the end of Israel (747-722 BC) 2 Kings 15:8-17:41 12
12   Judah from Ahaz to Amon (743-640 BC) 2 Kings 16-21 13
13   Josiah to the Fall of Judah (639-586 BC) and course wrap-up 2 Kings 22-25 14

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop knowledge of the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age to the Iron II period
  • Evaluate and use textual, literary, and archaeological evidence
  • Demonstrate the ability to use libraries and the internet to gather resources for research
  • Construct a best-fit hypothesis or argument using ancient and modern evidence
  • Demonstrate critical thinking about the past to the present (and vice versa)
  • Improve oral and written presentation

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Tutorial paper
  • Participation

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate critical thinking about the past to the present (and vice versa)
  • Improve oral and written presentation
  • Investigate biblical literary techniques and themes

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment task

  • Participation

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop knowledge of the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age to the Iron II period
  • Evaluate and use textual, literary, and archaeological evidence
  • Demonstrate the ability to use libraries and the internet to gather resources for research
  • Improve oral and written presentation

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Participation

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop knowledge of the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age to the Iron II period
  • Evaluate and use textual, literary, and archaeological evidence
  • Demonstrate the ability to use libraries and the internet to gather resources for research
  • Construct a best-fit hypothesis or argument using ancient and modern evidence
  • Demonstrate critical thinking about the past to the present (and vice versa)
  • Improve oral and written presentation

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Weekly tutorial quiz
  • Tutorial paper

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop knowledge of the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age to the Iron II period
  • Evaluate and use textual, literary, and archaeological evidence
  • Construct a best-fit hypothesis or argument using ancient and modern evidence
  • Demonstrate critical thinking about the past to the present (and vice versa)
  • Improve oral and written presentation

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Weekly tutorial quiz
  • Tutorial paper
  • Participation

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Evaluate and use textual, literary, and archaeological evidence
  • Demonstrate the ability to use libraries and the internet to gather resources for research
  • Construct a best-fit hypothesis or argument using ancient and modern evidence
  • Demonstrate critical thinking about the past to the present (and vice versa)
  • Improve oral and written presentation

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Participation

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop knowledge of the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age to the Iron II period
  • Evaluate and use textual, literary, and archaeological evidence
  • Demonstrate the ability to use libraries and the internet to gather resources for research
  • Construct a best-fit hypothesis or argument using ancient and modern evidence
  • Demonstrate critical thinking about the past to the present (and vice versa)
  • Improve oral and written presentation
  • Investigate biblical literary techniques and themes

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Weekly tutorial quiz
  • Tutorial paper
  • Participation

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop knowledge of the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age to the Iron II period
  • Evaluate and use textual, literary, and archaeological evidence
  • Demonstrate the ability to use libraries and the internet to gather resources for research
  • Construct a best-fit hypothesis or argument using ancient and modern evidence
  • Demonstrate critical thinking about the past to the present (and vice versa)
  • Improve oral and written presentation
  • Investigate biblical literary techniques and themes

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Weekly tutorial quiz
  • Tutorial paper
  • Participation

Assignment Submission, Extensions and Penalties

ASSIGNMENT SUBMISSIONS

ALL written assignments (tutorial paper, essay) will be submitted online through the AHIS250 iLearn site.

EXTENSIONS

Extensions for assignments and waivers for penalties for non-attendance can only be granted for medical reasons or on compassionate grounds.

Without documentation (medical or counselling certificate), a penalty of 2% a day (including weekends) will be applied.

If you need an extension this must be agreed on after discussion with the course convenor, who may ask for documentation. You must apply for an extension before the assignment due date. Extensions asked for after the date will not be granted.

Note: Always retain a copy of completed tasks in case of loss.