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PSY 238 – Introduction to Psycholinguistics

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor and main lecturer
Linda Cupples
Contact via Email
AHH, Level 3 North, Room 517
By appointment
Tutor
Caroline Moir
Contact via Email
By appointment
Tutor
Jo Fitzgibbon
Contact via Email
By appointment
Tutor
Thembi Dube
Contact via Email
By appointment
Administration
Margaret Wood
Contact via Email or Phone 9850 8740
C5A 502
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
LING110 or LING111 or [(PSY104(P) or PSYC104) and (PSY105(P) or PSYC105)]
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
LING214
Unit description Unit description
This unit introduces a psychological perspective into the study of language. We explore models of the perceptual and cognitive processes that are involved in acquiring and using linguistic knowledge, considering evidence from typical language users and people with language disorders. Specific topics include: word recognition and understanding; sentence comprehension; language production; aphasia; skilled reading and reading development; acquired and developmental reading disorders; acquired spelling disorders; and first language acquisition.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe and evaluate theories and research in psycholinguistics
  2. Recognise the kinds of questions that psycholinguists ask
  3. Identify the methods of data collection that psycholinguists use
  4. Critically analyse empirical research articles in psycholinguistics.
  5. Interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions/issues
  6. Analyse language and reading disorder
  7. Evaluate psycholinguistic theories of typical language processing using data from people with disordered language

General Assessment Information

Assignment Submission

Please note that all assignments (assessments 1 to 3 above) must be submitted electronically via the LING214 iLearn website by midnight on the due date. 

Tutorial Attendance

Although no mark is assigned for participation in this unit, attendance at tutorials is expected and class rolls will be taken. Please note that the information provided to you and the activities in which you will engage during tutorial classes are directly related to successful completion of assessment tasks 1 to 3.

Late Penalties

There are several points to note in regard to late submission of assignments:

  1. Unless students have negotiated an extension based on documented evidence of significant disruption to their studies, a penalty of 5% per day will apply to late submission of assignments.
  2. Again, unless otherwise negotiated, assignments will not be accepted at all AFTER the date on which marked assignments are returned to all students in the unit.
  3. Requests for extensions for assignments are submitted online via Ask (http://ask.mq.edu.au) and granted by the Unit Convenor. Ordinarily, no extensions of time for submission of written work will be granted since ample time for its preparation will have been given. If an extension is required for medical or other extenuating circumstances, an application must be made in accordance with the Macquarie University Disruptions to Study Policy (see http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html). The Professional Authority Form (PAF) is the officially required documentation, which must be completed by a registered health professional or professional within Macquarie University Campus Wellbeing and Support Services. A copy of the PAF is available online from: http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html. All requests for extensions should be made prior to the due date for the assignment. If an extension is granted the authorisation section of the form must be submitted with the assignment. Failure to do so will result in a late penalty being applied as the marker will not know that an extension has been granted.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Assessment 1 20% Thursday 7 September
Assessment 2 5% Thursday 12 October
Assessment 3 30% Thursday 2 November
Assessment 4 45% Exam period

Assessment 1

Due: Thursday 7 September
Weighting: 20%

A written critique of a published research paper. The paper to be critiqued for this assignment will be made available to students in week 2. The critique should be a maximum of 1,000 words (double-spaced and printed in a 12-point font with 2.54 cm margins). The word limit includes in-text referencing but does not include the title page or the reference list at the end.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Recognise the kinds of questions that psycholinguists ask
  • Identify the methods of data collection that psycholinguists use
  • Critically analyse empirical research articles in psycholinguistics.
  • Interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions/issues
  • Analyse language and reading disorder

Assessment 2

Due: Thursday 12 October
Weighting: 5%

A brief outline (maximum of one double-spaced A4 page) of the structure and content of the introduction to your research report, which should contain: (1) four topic sentences, one for each paragraph of the introduction; (2) a clear statement of the hypotheses; and (3) a list of references you intend to incorporate in your final report. Note that you will receive 5% of your mark in the unit for submitting this assignment. Class-based formative feedback will be provided in the lecture and tutorials in the week following submission.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Describe and evaluate theories and research in psycholinguistics
  • Recognise the kinds of questions that psycholinguists ask

Assessment 3

Due: Thursday 2 November
Weighting: 30%

A research report based on a class experiment. The data for this assignment will be made available to students by week 8. The report should be a maximum of 2,400 words (double-spaced and printed in a 12-point font with 2.54 cm margins). The word limit includes in-text referencing but does not include the reference list at the end, nor the tables and figures, abstract, title page or appendices.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Describe and evaluate theories and research in psycholinguistics
  • Recognise the kinds of questions that psycholinguists ask
  • Identify the methods of data collection that psycholinguists use
  • Critically analyse empirical research articles in psycholinguistics.
  • Interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions/issues

Assessment 4

Due: Exam period
Weighting: 45%

A closed-book end-of-year exam comprising multiple-choice and short-answer questions and covering both lecture and tutorial content.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Describe and evaluate theories and research in psycholinguistics
  • Interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions/issues
  • Analyse language and reading disorder
  • Evaluate psycholinguistic theories of typical language processing using data from people with disordered language

Delivery and Resources

Classes

Lectures: Students attend one 2-hour lecture per week for this unit, which is scheduled for Wednesdays from 2 pm to 4 pm in C5C T1 (Theatre). The lecture programme is outlined in this guide.

Tutorials: There is one 1-hour tutorial per week for this unit. Tutorials begin in the second week of semester. Seven optional tutorial times are offered as indicated below.

Note: Students will be able to access the recording of the lecture through iLearn, but are expected to attend tutorial classes, which relate directly to successful completion of assessment tasks 1 to 3. 

Tutorial Options      
Day Start Time Room Tutor
Wednesday 4 pm W6B 345 Jo Fitzgibbon
Wednesday 5 pm X5B 039 Jo Fitzgibbon
Thursday 10 am E7B 264 Jo Fitzgibbon
Thursday 11 am W6B 345 Caroline Moir
Thursday 12 pm E4B 316 Caroline Moir
Thursday  2 pm E3B 217 Thembi Dube
Thursday 4 pm W5A 101 Thembi Dube

Required and recommended texts and/or materials

The prescribed text for this unit is: Harley, T. A. (2014). The psychology of language: From data to theory (4th edition). Hove, East Sussex: Psychology Press Ltd. It is available in hardcover, paperback, or a Kindle edition. One electronic copy of this text is available in the library reserve section.

See the unit website for details of other required readings for tutorials and assessment exercises.

Unit web page

The web page for this unit can be found at: https://ilearn.mq.edu.au

Technologies used and required

  • Word processing for completing assignments 1 to 3; internet access (for downloading lecture and tutorial materials and for uploading assignments).
  • No other technologies.

Changes since last offering

  • There have been no major substantive changes to the unit since its last offering. 

 

Unit Schedule

 

 

Week Lecture Topic

Textbook Chapter

1 What is psycholinguistics? Course outline. 1-3
2 Language comprehension: Recognising words 6
3 Language comprehension: Understanding words 11
4 Language comprehension: Understanding sentences 10, 12
5 Language comprehension: Understanding sentences 10, 12
6 Language production, typical and disordered 13
7 Skilled language processing: Revision, practice test N/A
   Mid-semester Break (2 weeks)  
8 Skilled adult reading and writing and acquired dyslexia and dysgraphia 7
9 Typical reading development 8
10 Developmental disorders of reading 8
11 Reading development in special populations N/A
12 Language development in infancy 4
13 Later language development 4

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

 

Final Exams

The University Examination period in Session 2, is from 13 November to 1 December 2017.

You are expected to present yourself for examination at the time and place designated in the University Examination Timetable. The timetable will be available in Draft form approximately eight weeks before the commencement of the examinations and in Final form approximately four weeks before the commencement of the examinations.

http://www.timetables.mq.edu.au/exam

The only exception to not sitting an examination at the designated time is because of documented illness or unavoidable disruption. In these circumstances you may wish to consider applying for Special Consideration.  Information about unavoidable disruption and the special consideration process is available at  http://www.ling.mq.edu.au/support/process_special.htm

If a Supplementary Examination is granted as a result of the Special Consideration process, the examination will be scheduled after the conclusion of the official examination period. The format of a supplementary examination is at each unit convener’s discretion and is subject to change from the original final examination.

Supplementary Exams are only offered to students who have completed all other assessments for the unit and were unable to sit the final exam because of documented illness or unavoidable disruption.

Instructions on applying for sitting of a supplementary exam are available from the website, http://www.ling.mq.edu.au/support/process_special.htm.  It is the student’s responsibility to follow the steps outlined in this website. Students awarded a supplementary will NOT be sent a letter. It is the student’s responsibility to check the web and their student email to see whether a supplementary exam has been granted.  Students who are granted to sit for a supplementary exam must make themselves available to sit for the supplementary exam on the specified date. There will be only one alternative time. It is the student’s responsibility to email the unit convenor to confirm attendance at the supplementary exams.

You are advised that it is Macquarie University policy not to set early examinations for individuals or groups of students. All students are expected to ensure that they are available until the end of the teaching session, which is the final day of the official examination period.

Academic Honesty

Academic honesty is an integral part of the core values and principles contained in the Macquarie University Ethics Statement. The Policy covering Academic Honesty is available on the web at: http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Plagiarism is an example of dishonest academic behaviour and is defined by the Policy on Academic honesty as: “Using the work or ideas of another person and presenting this as your own without clear acknowledgement of the source of the work or ideas”.

Plagiarism is a serious breach of the University's rules and carries significant penalties.  The Academic honesty Procedure is available at http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/procedure.html

This procedure notes the following responsibilities for students:

  • Act in accordance with the principles of the Academic Honesty Policy.
  • Become familiar with what academic dishonesty is, what are appropriate referencing techniques and the consequences of poor practice.
  • Seek assistance from the unit convenor (or their nominee) to remedy any deficits or if you are unsure of discipline specific practice.
  • Submit only work of which you are the author or that properly acknowledges others.
  • Do not lend your original work to any other person for any reason.
  • Keep drafts of your own authored work and notes showing the authorship or source of ideas that are not your own.

The penalties which can be applied for academic dishonesty are outlined in the Academic Dishonesty – Schedule of Penalties which can be found at: http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/schedule_penalties.html 

The penalties range from applying a fail grade for the assessment task or requiring the student to re-submit the assessment task for a mark no greater than 50 to applying a fail grade to the unit of study and referral to the University Discipline committee.

You must read the University's Policy and Procedure on Academic Honesty.

In summary, remember that you, as a good student, are responsible for ensuring academic integrity practices are followed at all times. Your first step is to read the University's Academic Honesty Policy, and make sure you know what constitutes good practice. Then make sure you know how to reference and cite correctly. There are other practices we need to consider, and one of these is the potential for collusion.

Informal study groups are encouraged as a good way to assist your learning, but please remember that all your independently assessed assignments must be totally independently completed. Unless you are doing a group project where each member contributes to producing one piece of work, for which you get the one mark, using part or all of someone else's work constitutes collusion and breaches the University's Academic Honesty policy.

Do not collude with any other student by selling, giving, lending, explaining or showing all or parts of your independently assessed work/answers/past or current assignments, and do not ask to buy, borrow, see and use all or parts of the work of another student.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe and evaluate theories and research in psycholinguistics
  • Recognise the kinds of questions that psycholinguists ask
  • Identify the methods of data collection that psycholinguists use
  • Interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions/issues
  • Analyse language and reading disorder
  • Evaluate psycholinguistic theories of typical language processing using data from people with disordered language

Assessment tasks

  • Assessment 1
  • Assessment 3
  • Assessment 4

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe and evaluate theories and research in psycholinguistics
  • Critically analyse empirical research articles in psycholinguistics.
  • Interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions/issues
  • Analyse language and reading disorder
  • Evaluate psycholinguistic theories of typical language processing using data from people with disordered language

Assessment tasks

  • Assessment 1
  • Assessment 2
  • Assessment 3
  • Assessment 4

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe and evaluate theories and research in psycholinguistics
  • Recognise the kinds of questions that psycholinguists ask
  • Identify the methods of data collection that psycholinguists use
  • Critically analyse empirical research articles in psycholinguistics.
  • Interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions/issues
  • Analyse language and reading disorder
  • Evaluate psycholinguistic theories of typical language processing using data from people with disordered language

Assessment tasks

  • Assessment 1
  • Assessment 2
  • Assessment 3

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Recognise the kinds of questions that psycholinguists ask
  • Interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions/issues

Assessment tasks

  • Assessment 2
  • Assessment 3

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe and evaluate theories and research in psycholinguistics
  • Critically analyse empirical research articles in psycholinguistics.
  • Interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions/issues
  • Analyse language and reading disorder

Assessment tasks

  • Assessment 1
  • Assessment 2
  • Assessment 3
  • Assessment 4

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify the methods of data collection that psycholinguists use
  • Analyse language and reading disorder
  • Evaluate psycholinguistic theories of typical language processing using data from people with disordered language

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyse language and reading disorder
  • Evaluate psycholinguistic theories of typical language processing using data from people with disordered language

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe and evaluate theories and research in psycholinguistics
  • Critically analyse empirical research articles in psycholinguistics.
  • Interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions/issues
  • Analyse language and reading disorder
  • Evaluate psycholinguistic theories of typical language processing using data from people with disordered language

Assessment tasks

  • Assessment 1
  • Assessment 3
  • Assessment 4

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe and evaluate theories and research in psycholinguistics
  • Critically analyse empirical research articles in psycholinguistics.
  • Interpret empirical data in relation to theoretical questions/issues

Assessment tasks

  • Assessment 1
  • Assessment 3