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SOC 322 – Human Services in the 21st Century: Care, Gender and Institutions

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Charlotte Overgaard
Tobia Fattore
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
39cp at 100 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit is based on an exploration of the concept of care and its meaning in a range of different human service developments such as mental health, childcare, child protection, disability services and aged care. A starting point for these discussions is an examination of the ideas of care. We explore the links between informal supports, typically, although not exclusively, provided by women within families and households, and formal supports as provided by professional, trained and untrained staff, through organisations and other, often newly emergent, systems of support. Drawing together the fields of social theory and applied research, this unit provides an opportunity to examine responses to changing concepts of human need for interpersonal support. You will be able to learn from policy makers and practitioners working in this field, and enjoy opportunities to analyse state of the art studies of care and human services in Australia and other comparable countries.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. A critical understanding of the different meanings attached to the concept of care and of changing patterns in the need for care across the life course;
  2. A capacity to analyse the characteristics of care in intimate interpersonal relationships, as well as in contexts in which professional relationships require the provision of care to strangers;
  3. Recognition of the contribution of a range of sociological, economic and demographic and other perspectives to developments in care and human services;
  4. An ability to work with a range of policy documents concerned with the planning, provision, regulation, and funding of human services;
  5. Experience in considering the application a number of research perspectives to the study of human services;
  6. Capability of working as part of a social research or policy development team in the field; and
  7. A demonstrated understanding of the key issues involved in undertaking social analyses of policies and programs for the development of human services.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Human Services Briefing Paper 30% April 2 (End of Week 5)
Innovation review 40% June 4 (End of Week 12)
Participation and discussion 20% Weekly
Multiple Choice Quiz 10% 11 June (end week 13)

Human Services Briefing Paper

Due: April 2 (End of Week 5)
Weighting: 30%

Human Services Briefing Paper

Length: 1,000 words maximum (Not including appendices, figures, tables or bibliography)

Prepare a short briefing paper on the services (or programs), facilities, budget and numbers of clients in one human service sector in Australia. Focus on one of the following areas of service provision: aged care; disability support services; child care; child protection services; mental health care; or supported accommodation services. 

In your briefing paper, provide a critical overview of services across Australia and include as far as possible, a comparison of interstate variations. Use tables to present comparative data where applicable. 

More details are provided on the iLearn page.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • A critical understanding of the different meanings attached to the concept of care and of changing patterns in the need for care across the life course;
  • Recognition of the contribution of a range of sociological, economic and demographic and other perspectives to developments in care and human services;
  • An ability to work with a range of policy documents concerned with the planning, provision, regulation, and funding of human services;
  • Experience in considering the application a number of research perspectives to the study of human services;
  • Capability of working as part of a social research or policy development team in the field; and
  • A demonstrated understanding of the key issues involved in undertaking social analyses of policies and programs for the development of human services.

Innovation review

Due: June 4 (End of Week 12)
Weighting: 40%

Length: 2,000 words maximum (Not including appendices, figures, tables or bibliography)  

Identify one recent innovation in human service delivery in Australia or one overseas country and critically examine its characteristics, the logic for its introduction, and its current or potential contribution to policy. The review should also discuss links between the development of the innovation and broader processes of social, demographic and political change.    

The review should be with reference to an innovation that relates to one or several of the following fields of human services: 

• aged care; 

• disability services; 

• mental health;

• child protection; 

• child care; 

• health care; or 

• supported accommodation.   

 

Some examples of the innovations that could be considered include: 

• case management innovations; 

• consumer-directed care; 

• service contracting arrangements; 

• improvements in service coordination; or 

• innovative servicing arrangements for a particular client group. 

 More detailed guidelines for undertaking this assignment are provided on the iLearn page.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • A critical understanding of the different meanings attached to the concept of care and of changing patterns in the need for care across the life course;
  • A capacity to analyse the characteristics of care in intimate interpersonal relationships, as well as in contexts in which professional relationships require the provision of care to strangers;
  • Recognition of the contribution of a range of sociological, economic and demographic and other perspectives to developments in care and human services;
  • An ability to work with a range of policy documents concerned with the planning, provision, regulation, and funding of human services;
  • Experience in considering the application a number of research perspectives to the study of human services;
  • Capability of working as part of a social research or policy development team in the field; and
  • A demonstrated understanding of the key issues involved in undertaking social analyses of policies and programs for the development of human services.

Participation and discussion

Due: Weekly
Weighting: 20%

Internal students:

Attendance at the tutorial each week is required. All students will be assigned a mark for participation in the workshop based on:

• Leading the tutorial for one week. This includes providing a presentation based on the weekly readings and facilitating discussion and participation for the other students (for instance through a small group exercise);

• Evidence that you are completing the readings each week. This will be assessed by submission of a brief reading summary for one of the readings each week from Week 2; and,

• Your contribution to discussions and involvement in workshop activities.  

From Week 2 – 12 you will be required to submit on a weekly basis a summary of one of the set readings for the week.  In your own words briefly express the main idea, arguments and other relevant details of your selected reading.  Your purpose in writing the summary is to give the basic ideas of the reading and relate it to the weekly topic.  What was it about and what did the author(s) want to communicate?

 The reading summary should be no longer than 150 words.

You will also be required to lead a discussion on one of the weekly topics, either on your own or with others that week. When you lead a tutorial discussion you are also required to submit discussion notes setting out the main points for discussion, which can be used as resources for other students on the topic.

You will be assessed on your ability to engage the other students, and; the quality of your written presentation.

External students: 

External students will also be required to participate and demonstrate their participation. This assessment task is intended to encourage and reward you for actively engaging with the ideas presented in the lectures and readings. 

Instead of attending weekly tutorials, you are required to record your ideas on one of the readings for each week by writing a paragraph (or two or three, 100 - 400 words per week) and posting it on the Online Discussion Board.

There will also be guided discussion points that will be posted for your use in the course of the unit. 

The discussion board allows you to engage with others in debate, so please read what others have said before submitting your post each week. The quality of your postings and extent of your engagement with others will be used to assess this assessment. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • A critical understanding of the different meanings attached to the concept of care and of changing patterns in the need for care across the life course;
  • A capacity to analyse the characteristics of care in intimate interpersonal relationships, as well as in contexts in which professional relationships require the provision of care to strangers;
  • Recognition of the contribution of a range of sociological, economic and demographic and other perspectives to developments in care and human services;
  • Experience in considering the application a number of research perspectives to the study of human services;
  • A demonstrated understanding of the key issues involved in undertaking social analyses of policies and programs for the development of human services.

Multiple Choice Quiz

Due: 11 June (end week 13)
Weighting: 10%

The quiz opens on June 5 and closes on June 11 (Week 13).

This is a short, ten question multiple-choice test. The examination will be undertaken on-line and will cover material presented in the lectures.    


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • A critical understanding of the different meanings attached to the concept of care and of changing patterns in the need for care across the life course;
  • Recognition of the contribution of a range of sociological, economic and demographic and other perspectives to developments in care and human services;
  • A demonstrated understanding of the key issues involved in undertaking social analyses of policies and programs for the development of human services.

Delivery and Resources

While there are no required texts for this unit, we will be extensively using the following resources:

• Fine, M.D. (2007) A Caring Society? Care and the Dilemmas of Human Service in the 21st Century, Palgrave MacMillan, Houndmills and New York. 

• Australia’s Welfare, 2015, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Canberra  (This can be downloaded free from: http://www.aihw.gov.au/publicationdetail/?id=60129552015)   

Other recommended texts for this unit include: 

Palmer, G and S. Short (2010) Health Care and Public Policy. An Australian Analysis (4th Ed), Palgrave MacMillan, South Yarra 

Other course readings and texts are listed in the weekly overview. You are also encouraged to seek out others through the electronic databases available through the library and from other sources. 

Unit Schedule

Week 1

March 1

Introduction: Care and Human Services

Week 2

March 8

Understanding care: Contested definitions and perspectives

(Tutorials commence this week)

Week 3

March 15

Families or organisations: The substitutability of care

Week 4

March 22

Care and organisations: Bureaucracies and alternative models

Week 5

March 29

Total Institutions

Week 6

April 5

Reinventing Human Services: The social market for care

Week 7

April 12

The Human Services Workforce

BREAK

Week 8

May 3

New Organisational Logics and the Political Economy of Globalised Service Provision 

Week 9

May 10

Human services site visit – No classes

Week 10

May 17

Care around the world: Care and welfare state regimes

Week 11

May 24

New perspectives on human services: Individualisation, the body and risk 

Week 12

May 31

The Future of Human Services

Week 13

June 7

Study week – No classes

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A critical understanding of the different meanings attached to the concept of care and of changing patterns in the need for care across the life course;
  • A capacity to analyse the characteristics of care in intimate interpersonal relationships, as well as in contexts in which professional relationships require the provision of care to strangers;
  • Recognition of the contribution of a range of sociological, economic and demographic and other perspectives to developments in care and human services;
  • An ability to work with a range of policy documents concerned with the planning, provision, regulation, and funding of human services;
  • Experience in considering the application a number of research perspectives to the study of human services;
  • Capability of working as part of a social research or policy development team in the field; and
  • A demonstrated understanding of the key issues involved in undertaking social analyses of policies and programs for the development of human services.

Assessment tasks

  • Human Services Briefing Paper
  • Innovation review
  • Participation and discussion
  • Multiple Choice Quiz

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A critical understanding of the different meanings attached to the concept of care and of changing patterns in the need for care across the life course;
  • A capacity to analyse the characteristics of care in intimate interpersonal relationships, as well as in contexts in which professional relationships require the provision of care to strangers;
  • Recognition of the contribution of a range of sociological, economic and demographic and other perspectives to developments in care and human services;
  • An ability to work with a range of policy documents concerned with the planning, provision, regulation, and funding of human services;
  • Experience in considering the application a number of research perspectives to the study of human services;
  • Capability of working as part of a social research or policy development team in the field; and

Assessment tasks

  • Human Services Briefing Paper
  • Innovation review
  • Participation and discussion
  • Multiple Choice Quiz

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A critical understanding of the different meanings attached to the concept of care and of changing patterns in the need for care across the life course;
  • A capacity to analyse the characteristics of care in intimate interpersonal relationships, as well as in contexts in which professional relationships require the provision of care to strangers;
  • Recognition of the contribution of a range of sociological, economic and demographic and other perspectives to developments in care and human services;
  • An ability to work with a range of policy documents concerned with the planning, provision, regulation, and funding of human services;
  • Experience in considering the application a number of research perspectives to the study of human services;
  • Capability of working as part of a social research or policy development team in the field; and
  • A demonstrated understanding of the key issues involved in undertaking social analyses of policies and programs for the development of human services.

Assessment tasks

  • Human Services Briefing Paper
  • Innovation review
  • Participation and discussion
  • Multiple Choice Quiz

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A critical understanding of the different meanings attached to the concept of care and of changing patterns in the need for care across the life course;
  • A capacity to analyse the characteristics of care in intimate interpersonal relationships, as well as in contexts in which professional relationships require the provision of care to strangers;
  • Recognition of the contribution of a range of sociological, economic and demographic and other perspectives to developments in care and human services;
  • An ability to work with a range of policy documents concerned with the planning, provision, regulation, and funding of human services;
  • Experience in considering the application a number of research perspectives to the study of human services;
  • A demonstrated understanding of the key issues involved in undertaking social analyses of policies and programs for the development of human services.

Assessment tasks

  • Human Services Briefing Paper
  • Innovation review
  • Participation and discussion
  • Multiple Choice Quiz

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A critical understanding of the different meanings attached to the concept of care and of changing patterns in the need for care across the life course;
  • A capacity to analyse the characteristics of care in intimate interpersonal relationships, as well as in contexts in which professional relationships require the provision of care to strangers;
  • Recognition of the contribution of a range of sociological, economic and demographic and other perspectives to developments in care and human services;
  • An ability to work with a range of policy documents concerned with the planning, provision, regulation, and funding of human services;
  • Experience in considering the application a number of research perspectives to the study of human services;

Assessment tasks

  • Human Services Briefing Paper
  • Innovation review
  • Participation and discussion
  • Multiple Choice Quiz

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A critical understanding of the different meanings attached to the concept of care and of changing patterns in the need for care across the life course;
  • Recognition of the contribution of a range of sociological, economic and demographic and other perspectives to developments in care and human services;
  • An ability to work with a range of policy documents concerned with the planning, provision, regulation, and funding of human services;

Assessment tasks

  • Human Services Briefing Paper
  • Innovation review
  • Participation and discussion
  • Multiple Choice Quiz

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A critical understanding of the different meanings attached to the concept of care and of changing patterns in the need for care across the life course;
  • A capacity to analyse the characteristics of care in intimate interpersonal relationships, as well as in contexts in which professional relationships require the provision of care to strangers;
  • Recognition of the contribution of a range of sociological, economic and demographic and other perspectives to developments in care and human services;
  • An ability to work with a range of policy documents concerned with the planning, provision, regulation, and funding of human services;
  • Experience in considering the application a number of research perspectives to the study of human services;
  • Capability of working as part of a social research or policy development team in the field; and
  • A demonstrated understanding of the key issues involved in undertaking social analyses of policies and programs for the development of human services.

Assessment tasks

  • Human Services Briefing Paper
  • Innovation review
  • Participation and discussion
  • Multiple Choice Quiz

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A critical understanding of the different meanings attached to the concept of care and of changing patterns in the need for care across the life course;
  • A capacity to analyse the characteristics of care in intimate interpersonal relationships, as well as in contexts in which professional relationships require the provision of care to strangers;
  • Recognition of the contribution of a range of sociological, economic and demographic and other perspectives to developments in care and human services;
  • An ability to work with a range of policy documents concerned with the planning, provision, regulation, and funding of human services;
  • Experience in considering the application a number of research perspectives to the study of human services;
  • Capability of working as part of a social research or policy development team in the field; and

Assessment tasks

  • Human Services Briefing Paper
  • Innovation review
  • Participation and discussion
  • Multiple Choice Quiz

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • A critical understanding of the different meanings attached to the concept of care and of changing patterns in the need for care across the life course;
  • Recognition of the contribution of a range of sociological, economic and demographic and other perspectives to developments in care and human services;
  • An ability to work with a range of policy documents concerned with the planning, provision, regulation, and funding of human services;
  • Capability of working as part of a social research or policy development team in the field; and
  • A demonstrated understanding of the key issues involved in undertaking social analyses of policies and programs for the development of human services.

Assessment tasks

  • Human Services Briefing Paper
  • Innovation review
  • Participation and discussion
  • Multiple Choice Quiz