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HLTH310 – Health Promotion

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor and Lecturer
Melissa Johnstone
Contact via 02-9850-9807
Rm 265, X5B
By Appointment
Tutor
Fernando Hincapie
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
(39cp at 100 level or above including HLTH200) or (39cp and admission to BHumanSc or BA-PsychBHumanSc or BPsych(Hons)BHumanSc)
Corequisites Corequisites
ECH326 or EDUC363 or MKTG309 or PSY339 or SOC322
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit provides students with an overview of the theories, practices and frameworks of health promotion as a planned approach to the improvement of health in population groups. It focuses on both local and global health promotion issues. The unit aims to increase students' understanding of the determinants of health and how these impact on the planning, implementation and evaluation of health promotion initiatives. The teaching approach facilitates a systematic approach to health promotion initiatives. The unit uses a mixture of academic texts, case studies, scenarios and reflective learning practices to immerse students in the study of modern health promotion and disease prevention and reduction practices. While designed primarily for health studies students, the unit is also suitable for students from other programs who may be interested the social, economic, political and geographic aspects of this fundamental area of human health endeavours.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Define and describe health promotion and its place within the area of public health, both nationally and internationally.
  2. Summarise key theories of contemporary health promotion and their connection to health determinants.
  3. Critically analyse some health promotion programs and projects in terms of their application of theories and practices of contemporary health promotion.
  4. Discuss and make informed opinions about some of the social, cultural, economic and political factors that may influence health promotion initiatives nationally and internationally.
  5. Describe the various elements that are needed to plan, implement and evaluate a health promotion initiative and be able to apply this knowledge to the development of a health promotion initiative.
  6. Examine and form opinions about academic writings on the process and application of an evidence-based approach to health promotion initiatives.
  7. Gain some insights into the rapidly evolving nature of health promotion globally and the effect on health promotion practitioners, with an emphasis on working in teams, across sectors and incorporating continuous flexible learning practices.

General Assessment Information

Assessment/Standards

Macquarie University uses the following grades in coursework units of study:

HD

High Distinction

85-100

D

Distinction

75-84

CR

Credit

65-74

P

Pass

50-64

F

Fail

0-49

Grade descriptors and other information concerning grading are contained in the Macquarie University Grading Policy, which is available at: http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/grading/policy.html

Further details for each assessment task will be available on iLearn.

All final grades in the Faculty of Human Sciences are determined by a grading committee and are not the sole responsibility of the Unit Convenor.

Students will be awarded one of these grades plus a Standardised Numerical Grade (SNG). The SNG is not necessarily a summation of the individual assessment components. The final grade and SNG that are awarded reflect the corresponding grade descriptor in the Grading Policy.

 

Department of Educational Studies (EC) Academic Honesty Guidelines:  

All assignments should cite and provide full bibliographical details of all material that you have used to inform or support your ideas. At the Department of Educational Studies, students are required to use the American Psychological Association (APA) referencing procedures. Full details about how to cite and reference correctly can be found in Perrin (2015) and in the Academic Honesty Handbook.  

Perrin, R. (2015). Pocket guide to APA style (5th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.

 

Assignment extensions and late penalties

Applications for extensions must be made via AskMQ at https://ask.mq.edu.au as a "Disruption to Studies" request before the submission date. Students who experience a disruption to their studies through ill-health or misadventure are able to apply for this request. Extensions can only be granted if they meet the Disruption to Studies policy and are submitted via ask.mq.edu.au. This will ensure consistency in the consideration of such requests is maintained.

In general, there should be no need for extensions except through illness or misadventure that would be categorised as unavoidable disruption according to the University definition of same, and currently available at: http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/exams/disruption_to_studies/

Late submissions without extension will receive a penalty of 5% reduction of the total possible mark for each day late (including weekends and public holidays). You are reminded that submitting even just 1 day late could be the difference between passing and failing a unit. Late penalties are applied by unit convenors or their delegates after tasks are assessed.

No assessable work will be accepted after the return/release of marked work on the same topic. If a student is still permitted to submit on the basis of unavoidable disruption, an alternative topic may be set.

Students should keep an electronic file of all assessments. Claims regarding "lost" assessments cannot be made if the file cannot be produced. It is also advisable to keep an electronic file of all drafts and the final submission on a USB untouched/unopened after submission. This can be used to demonstrate easily that the assessment has not been amended after the submission date.

 

 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Group work presentation 10% week 8
Group work reflection report 10% Week 13
Essay 35% 13 April, 11.59pm
Final Exam 45% Exam period

Group work presentation

Due: week 8
Weighting: 10%

This assessment is the end-product (an in-class presentation) of a small group project which gives students an opportunity to implement core content from the course.  The group is to plan, develop and design one assigned aspect of a health promotion initiative. Students will employ research skills, planning abilities, creative talents, interpersonal skills and management experience to develop a health promotion initiative.

Presentation time is maximum of 15 minutes with a five minutes for questions and answers. A copy of the presentation materials (e.g. powerpoint slides etc) and any other materials used during the presentation is to be submitted and should include a list of references/websites/personal communication etc used in developing the presentation.  Further information is available on the iLearn space.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Define and describe health promotion and its place within the area of public health, both nationally and internationally.
  • Critically analyse some health promotion programs and projects in terms of their application of theories and practices of contemporary health promotion.
  • Discuss and make informed opinions about some of the social, cultural, economic and political factors that may influence health promotion initiatives nationally and internationally.
  • Describe the various elements that are needed to plan, implement and evaluate a health promotion initiative and be able to apply this knowledge to the development of a health promotion initiative.
  • Gain some insights into the rapidly evolving nature of health promotion globally and the effect on health promotion practitioners, with an emphasis on working in teams, across sectors and incorporating continuous flexible learning practices.

Group work reflection report

Due: Week 13
Weighting: 10%

This individual report is to provide students with an opportunity to reflect on the role they had to adopt in the small group project in addressing the topic and the assigned approach. The report should include comment on the health promotion issue and the experience of doing the group project. Further information is available on the iLearn space.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Define and describe health promotion and its place within the area of public health, both nationally and internationally.
  • Critically analyse some health promotion programs and projects in terms of their application of theories and practices of contemporary health promotion.
  • Discuss and make informed opinions about some of the social, cultural, economic and political factors that may influence health promotion initiatives nationally and internationally.
  • Gain some insights into the rapidly evolving nature of health promotion globally and the effect on health promotion practitioners, with an emphasis on working in teams, across sectors and incorporating continuous flexible learning practices.

Essay

Due: 13 April, 11.59pm
Weighting: 35%

Essay of 1800 words (excluding references) on ONE of three essay topics:

  1. A settings-based approach to advancing health and sustainability
  2. Promoting health via contact with nature
  3. Capacity building to promote health

Students will be provided with a key article for each of the above topics. Students will need to utilise a number of readings both from the course material and from their own research into the topic. Specifically, each essay topic requires students to: a) find and describe a case study to illustrate the essay topic; b) critically evaluate the strength of the evidence, including evaluation, and c) discuss issues (and recommendations) for wider application.

Essays will be submitted via turnitin.

Further information will be available on the iLearn space.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Define and describe health promotion and its place within the area of public health, both nationally and internationally.
  • Summarise key theories of contemporary health promotion and their connection to health determinants.
  • Critically analyse some health promotion programs and projects in terms of their application of theories and practices of contemporary health promotion.
  • Discuss and make informed opinions about some of the social, cultural, economic and political factors that may influence health promotion initiatives nationally and internationally.
  • Describe the various elements that are needed to plan, implement and evaluate a health promotion initiative and be able to apply this knowledge to the development of a health promotion initiative.
  • Examine and form opinions about academic writings on the process and application of an evidence-based approach to health promotion initiatives.
  • Gain some insights into the rapidly evolving nature of health promotion globally and the effect on health promotion practitioners, with an emphasis on working in teams, across sectors and incorporating continuous flexible learning practices.

Final Exam

Due: Exam period
Weighting: 45%

  • 2 hour exam (with 10 mins reading time)
  • Closed book exam
  • 30 MC questions worth 1 mark each
  • 3 x short answer questions worth 5 marks each
  • Questions will be derived from content from lectures, tutorials and associated readings.

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Define and describe health promotion and its place within the area of public health, both nationally and internationally.
  • Summarise key theories of contemporary health promotion and their connection to health determinants.
  • Critically analyse some health promotion programs and projects in terms of their application of theories and practices of contemporary health promotion.
  • Discuss and make informed opinions about some of the social, cultural, economic and political factors that may influence health promotion initiatives nationally and internationally.
  • Describe the various elements that are needed to plan, implement and evaluate a health promotion initiative and be able to apply this knowledge to the development of a health promotion initiative.
  • Examine and form opinions about academic writings on the process and application of an evidence-based approach to health promotion initiatives.
  • Gain some insights into the rapidly evolving nature of health promotion globally and the effect on health promotion practitioners, with an emphasis on working in teams, across sectors and incorporating continuous flexible learning practices.

Delivery and Resources

About this Unit

HLTH310 Health Promotion provides students with an overview of the theories, practices and frameworks of health promotion as a planned approach to improvement of heath in population groups and within the context of modern public health. It focuses on both local and global health promotion issues.  The unit aims to increase students' understanding of the social determinants of health and how these impact the planning, implementation and evaluation of health promotion activities. While designed primarily for Health Studies students and Bachelor of Human Science students, the unit is also suitable for students from other programs who may be interested in the social, economic, political and geographic aspects of this fundamental area of human health endeavours.

Technology:

HLTH310 makes use of web-based teaching support using iLearn (Moodle). Students will need access to a computer and to the internet.

Delivery and workload:  There are a total of three (3) contact hours per week - being two hours of lectures and one for the tutorial.  Attendance is expected at all lectures and tutorials - this unit is not offered as an external unit.  Recording of lectures is for the purpose of back-up in the event of unavoidable absences - frequent in-class discussion and the occasional recording difficulty may diminish the quality of the recording.

In addition to the face-to-face hours, the expected workload is (on average): 2 for required readings for lectures and tutorials, 1 for research, and 3 for assessments.  This is a total of 9 hours per week.  There may be peak times when assessments are due, so students are advised to plan well ahead of time to take this and their other commitments into consideration.

Resources:

Required text:

Keleher, H., &  MacDougall, C. (2015). Understanding Health, 4th edition. Oxford University Press.

Recommended texts:

Bauman, A. and Nutbeam, D., 2014. Evaluation in a Nutshell. A practical guide to the evaluation of health promotion programs. McGraw Hill Medical.

Nutbeam, D., Harris, E. and Wise, M., 2010. Theory in a Nutshell. A practical guide to health promotion theories. 3rd ed. McGraw Hill Medical.

 

 

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Academic Honesty and Assignments

All assignments should cite and provide full bibliographical details of all material that you have used to inform or support your ideas. At the Institute of Early Childhood, students are required to use the American Psychological Association (APA) referencing procedures. Full details about how to cite and reference correctly can be found in Perrin (2015) and in the IEC Academic Honesty Handbook

When preparing your assignments, it is essential that:

  • Students must retain a copy of all assignments before submission, and retain the copy until your final grade for the subject has been received;
  • Marks will be deducted if you submit your assessment late (refer to the ‘late assessments’ section below for more details);
  • Unless there are exceptional circumstances, no assessment will be accepted after the date that the assessment has been returned to other students.
  • If an assessment is considered to be below passing standard, another staff member on the unit will provide a second opinion. No failed assessment may be re-submitted.

Final Submissions

  • Students are responsible for checking that their submission has been successful and has been submitted by the due date and time.
  • Late submissions due to last minute technical difficulties will incur a lateness penalty.

 

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Define and describe health promotion and its place within the area of public health, both nationally and internationally.
  • Summarise key theories of contemporary health promotion and their connection to health determinants.
  • Critically analyse some health promotion programs and projects in terms of their application of theories and practices of contemporary health promotion.
  • Discuss and make informed opinions about some of the social, cultural, economic and political factors that may influence health promotion initiatives nationally and internationally.
  • Describe the various elements that are needed to plan, implement and evaluate a health promotion initiative and be able to apply this knowledge to the development of a health promotion initiative.
  • Gain some insights into the rapidly evolving nature of health promotion globally and the effect on health promotion practitioners, with an emphasis on working in teams, across sectors and incorporating continuous flexible learning practices.

Assessment tasks

  • Group work presentation
  • Final Exam

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Define and describe health promotion and its place within the area of public health, both nationally and internationally.
  • Critically analyse some health promotion programs and projects in terms of their application of theories and practices of contemporary health promotion.
  • Discuss and make informed opinions about some of the social, cultural, economic and political factors that may influence health promotion initiatives nationally and internationally.
  • Describe the various elements that are needed to plan, implement and evaluate a health promotion initiative and be able to apply this knowledge to the development of a health promotion initiative.
  • Gain some insights into the rapidly evolving nature of health promotion globally and the effect on health promotion practitioners, with an emphasis on working in teams, across sectors and incorporating continuous flexible learning practices.

Assessment tasks

  • Group work presentation
  • Group work reflection report
  • Essay

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critically analyse some health promotion programs and projects in terms of their application of theories and practices of contemporary health promotion.
  • Discuss and make informed opinions about some of the social, cultural, economic and political factors that may influence health promotion initiatives nationally and internationally.
  • Describe the various elements that are needed to plan, implement and evaluate a health promotion initiative and be able to apply this knowledge to the development of a health promotion initiative.
  • Examine and form opinions about academic writings on the process and application of an evidence-based approach to health promotion initiatives.
  • Gain some insights into the rapidly evolving nature of health promotion globally and the effect on health promotion practitioners, with an emphasis on working in teams, across sectors and incorporating continuous flexible learning practices.

Assessment tasks

  • Group work presentation
  • Group work reflection report
  • Essay

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Discuss and make informed opinions about some of the social, cultural, economic and political factors that may influence health promotion initiatives nationally and internationally.
  • Gain some insights into the rapidly evolving nature of health promotion globally and the effect on health promotion practitioners, with an emphasis on working in teams, across sectors and incorporating continuous flexible learning practices.

Assessment tasks

  • Group work reflection report
  • Final Exam

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Define and describe health promotion and its place within the area of public health, both nationally and internationally.
  • Summarise key theories of contemporary health promotion and their connection to health determinants.
  • Critically analyse some health promotion programs and projects in terms of their application of theories and practices of contemporary health promotion.
  • Discuss and make informed opinions about some of the social, cultural, economic and political factors that may influence health promotion initiatives nationally and internationally.
  • Describe the various elements that are needed to plan, implement and evaluate a health promotion initiative and be able to apply this knowledge to the development of a health promotion initiative.
  • Examine and form opinions about academic writings on the process and application of an evidence-based approach to health promotion initiatives.
  • Gain some insights into the rapidly evolving nature of health promotion globally and the effect on health promotion practitioners, with an emphasis on working in teams, across sectors and incorporating continuous flexible learning practices.

Assessment tasks

  • Group work presentation
  • Essay
  • Final Exam

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Define and describe health promotion and its place within the area of public health, both nationally and internationally.
  • Summarise key theories of contemporary health promotion and their connection to health determinants.
  • Critically analyse some health promotion programs and projects in terms of their application of theories and practices of contemporary health promotion.
  • Discuss and make informed opinions about some of the social, cultural, economic and political factors that may influence health promotion initiatives nationally and internationally.
  • Describe the various elements that are needed to plan, implement and evaluate a health promotion initiative and be able to apply this knowledge to the development of a health promotion initiative.
  • Examine and form opinions about academic writings on the process and application of an evidence-based approach to health promotion initiatives.
  • Gain some insights into the rapidly evolving nature of health promotion globally and the effect on health promotion practitioners, with an emphasis on working in teams, across sectors and incorporating continuous flexible learning practices.

Assessment tasks

  • Group work presentation
  • Essay
  • Final Exam

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critically analyse some health promotion programs and projects in terms of their application of theories and practices of contemporary health promotion.
  • Describe the various elements that are needed to plan, implement and evaluate a health promotion initiative and be able to apply this knowledge to the development of a health promotion initiative.
  • Examine and form opinions about academic writings on the process and application of an evidence-based approach to health promotion initiatives.
  • Gain some insights into the rapidly evolving nature of health promotion globally and the effect on health promotion practitioners, with an emphasis on working in teams, across sectors and incorporating continuous flexible learning practices.

Assessment tasks

  • Group work presentation
  • Group work reflection report
  • Essay

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Describe the various elements that are needed to plan, implement and evaluate a health promotion initiative and be able to apply this knowledge to the development of a health promotion initiative.

Assessment tasks

  • Group work presentation
  • Final Exam

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Summarise key theories of contemporary health promotion and their connection to health determinants.
  • Describe the various elements that are needed to plan, implement and evaluate a health promotion initiative and be able to apply this knowledge to the development of a health promotion initiative.
  • Gain some insights into the rapidly evolving nature of health promotion globally and the effect on health promotion practitioners, with an emphasis on working in teams, across sectors and incorporating continuous flexible learning practices.

Assessment tasks

  • Group work presentation
  • Group work reflection report
  • Essay
  • Final Exam