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CUL 260 – Health, Bodies, Media

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Lara Palombo
Contact via Lara.Palombo@mq.edu.au
Y3A TBA
Monday 1-2
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
15cp at 100 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
What does it mean to be 'healthy'? This course will critically examine the way we understand and imagine 'health'. We ask how our own embodied experiences of health or ill health shaped by media practices and forms, as well as wider biomedical and political institutions. We will focus particularly on the way health is imagined in broadcast and online media, including public health campaigns, popular science communication, news and current affairs, commercial advertising and popular entertainment television genres. Contemporary debates such as those around smoking, obesity, sexual health and mental illness will be analysed and discussed. We will explore how categories of 'health' and 'illness' play out in ethical and political decision making. How are ideas about 'normal' or 'pathological' bodies and identities tied into concepts of 'health'? And how does the idea that 'wellness' is an individual's responsibility underpin public policy and peoples' ways of understanding and managing their own bodies?

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which “health“ is understood and experienced across a range of contexts.
  2. Interrogate key concepts around “health”, showing an awareness of debates around definitions of these terms
  3. Outline a theoretically informed account of the relationship between forms of knowledge and experiences of embodied subjectivity and sociality
  4. Apply key methods of critical analysis to evaluate social economic, legal and or medical practices which focus on bodily-being
  5. Communicate effectively and ethically in a range of contexts and modes of writing
  6. Evidence engagement with and reflection on the process of learning

General Assessment Information

Late Submissions Assessment tasks above 10% (i.e. essay, essay plan, take home exam):

No extensions will be granted. Students who submit late work will receive a penalty of 10% per day (including weekends). This penalty does not apply for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

Please refer to the following webpage for policy information relating to Disruptions to Studies: http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/exams/disruption_to_studies/ 

Reading Summaries:

Students will not receive a mark for the reading summary if it is late, unless you have a serious medical or family reason for late submission and provide evidence of this to Lara Palombo by the due date.

If you have medical or family reasons for needing an extension, please contact Lara Palombo by email BEFORE  the assignment deadline. 

General:

If you have a serious medical or family situation that is likely to be an ongoing problem, or impact on your assessments in other units, you should submit a disruption to study request via ask.mq.edu.au.  Disruption to study forms should not be submitted if you have a short illness (eg a cold) that means you cannot attend a tutorial - in this case you should email Nicole to alert her to the reason for your absence. 

All assignments will be submitted electronically, via links on ilearn.  No hard copy submission will be required for this unit.

 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Take-home exam 20% Opens 1 Sept, closes 10 Sept
Reading summaries 10% Week 2-9, 11-12
Essay plan & planning meeting 15% midnight, Wednesday October 11
Essay 40% Midnight Tue 7th Nov
Active Contribution 15% ongoing

Take-home exam

Due: Opens 1 Sept, closes 10 Sept
Weighting: 20%

The open book multiple choice exam will require students to answer a series of multiple choice questions relating to the key readings for the course.  Careful reading of key readings in Weeks 1-6 will ensure successful completion of the exam.  The exam will open on Friday 1 September at 5pm and close at midnight on Sunday 10th September.  Correct answers to the exam will be available after the exam closes.

This early assessment task will enable students to reflect on what they know and the understandings they still need to develop.  It will also enable tutors to identify concept that need further explanation and students that need more assistance. 

Marking criteria

  • evidence of understanding of key concepts around health and normalizing practices
  • evidence of reading key texts set on the unit between Week 1-6

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which “health“ is understood and experienced across a range of contexts.
  • Interrogate key concepts around “health”, showing an awareness of debates around definitions of these terms

Reading summaries

Due: Week 2-9, 11-12
Weighting: 10%

Students must submit a reflective summary of the essential readings on the topic for that week between Weeks 2-9 and Week 11-12.  Summaries will be posted to the blog on ilearn by 9 a.m of Mondays, just before the tutorial in which that reading will be discussed.  Students must submit ten summaries over this period (there will be no set readings in Week 10). 

Since the purpose of summaries is to ensure that students are prepared for tutorials, summaries will not be accepted late, without documented medical or personal difficulties. Summaries will be submitted online via iLearn.  Each summary is worth 1% of the overall grade.

Marking critiera

  • timely completion of summaries on designated text
  • evidence of reading designated texts

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Evidence engagement with and reflection on the process of learning

Essay plan & planning meeting

Due: midnight, Wednesday October 11
Weighting: 15%

Students will submit a plan of between 400 and 500 words for the final essay, including a short bibliography of four sources.  This plan must be posted to ilearn by midnight Wednesday October 11.  In the following weeks, students will meet their tutor for a short 5-8 minute discussion of the essay plan.  Student will receive verbal feedback on their plans during the meeting. 

Marking criteria

  • Evidence of preparation and planning for one-to-one meeting with tutor, including prompt attendance
  • Thoughtful, responsive and reflective participation in discussion with tutor in one-to-one meeting
  • Demonstrated critical engagement with key arguments around “health”  within the unit
  • Demonstrated awareness of the relationship between forms of knowing and experiences of embodiment
  • Considered and effective organisation of argument
  • Clarity of written and spoken communication
  • Evidence of independent research within the discipline to support the argument
  • Accurate and appropriate use of referencing

 

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which “health“ is understood and experienced across a range of contexts.
  • Outline a theoretically informed account of the relationship between forms of knowledge and experiences of embodied subjectivity and sociality
  • Apply key methods of critical analysis to evaluate social economic, legal and or medical practices which focus on bodily-being
  • Communicate effectively and ethically in a range of contexts and modes of writing
  • Evidence engagement with and reflection on the process of learning

Essay

Due: Midnight Tue 7th Nov
Weighting: 40%

Students are required to write a 1800-2000 word essay.

This essay must be posted in ilearn by midnight of 7 November.

Along with the essay will include a completed reflective overview form which includes two elements

(1) a 100 word statement of the ways the student has responding to the feedback provided on the essay plan

(2) a statement of 100 words or less nominating three elements of the essay on which the student would like feedback.  Marks will be deducted if the reflective overview is not submitted with the essay.  The essay briefing will be posted on ilearn in Week 6.

Marking criteria

  • Consideration of the relationship between forms of knowing and experiences of embodiment
  • Evidence of familiarity and critical engagement with key arguments around “health” discussed within the unit
  • Application of cultural studies methods of critical analysis
  • Appropriate independent research within the discipline of cultural studies
  • Use of discipline-based research and reading to support the argument
  • Thoughtful and effective organisation of argument including clearly addressing the essay brief
  • Clarity of communication
  • Accurate, consistent and appropriate referencing
  • Evidence of reflection upon own learning and understandings, and use of tutor’s feedback on work
  • Effective completion of a reflective overview form including a statement of revisions made in the light of feedback and nomination of three area of endeavor for feedback from the marker

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which “health“ is understood and experienced across a range of contexts.
  • Interrogate key concepts around “health”, showing an awareness of debates around definitions of these terms
  • Outline a theoretically informed account of the relationship between forms of knowledge and experiences of embodied subjectivity and sociality
  • Apply key methods of critical analysis to evaluate social economic, legal and or medical practices which focus on bodily-being
  • Communicate effectively and ethically in a range of contexts and modes of writing
  • Evidence engagement with and reflection on the process of learning

Active Contribution

Due: ongoing
Weighting: 15%

Students are required to contrinute in this unit via in-class discussion (in tutorials and where possible, lectures) and on-line discussion (where lecture attendance is not possible). Students will be graded on the basis of the quantity and the quality of participation.  Attendance will be recorded both in tutorials and in lectures.  Those who cannot attend the face-to-face lecture on Monday and prefer to listen to the recording on iLearn will be required to submit five discussion questions to the folder on iLearn by the Tuesday (the day after the lecture), midnight. 

Given that lectures are frequently interactive with students analysing images or discussing issues, the discussion questions posted online by students will provide an opportunity for students to demonstrate their engagement with the lecture material.  Students who attend the face to face lectures will not be required to post discussion questions.

Marking criteria

  • evidence of contribution for tutorials by reading and attending (or auditing) lectures
  • regular attendance at tutorials
  • thoughtful, well informed contributions to tutorial discussions
  • demonstration of thoughtful and ethical attempts to share and develop ideas with peers and tutor
  • informed contribution to group discussion of lectures, either via in-class participation or via online discussion questions
  • evidence of reflection on own understandings and perspectives

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which “health“ is understood and experienced across a range of contexts.
  • Interrogate key concepts around “health”, showing an awareness of debates around definitions of these terms
  • Apply key methods of critical analysis to evaluate social economic, legal and or medical practices which focus on bodily-being
  • Communicate effectively and ethically in a range of contexts and modes of writing
  • Evidence engagement with and reflection on the process of learning

Delivery and Resources

Readings

Reading is essential to this unit.  Passing the open book exam and completing the weekly reading summaries (Weeks 2-9,11-12) will require you to very carefully read the essential readings for each week.  Some of the readings for the unit are very challenging and may require a second (or third!) reading.  Key concepts from readings will often be discussed in detail in lectures and tutorials.  However, you must ensure you are prepared for tutorials by reading beforehand.  Reading summaries for Weeks 2-9,11-12 will need to be submitted by 9 am on Mondays BEFORE tutorials.

All readings will be available via the library's ereserve system (click on the "Unit Readings" tab in the library front page).  If you prefer a paper reader, one can be ordered via Print on Demand.  Details of how to order a printed reader will be available on ilearn. Details of readings for each week can be found under Unit Schedule (below)

 

Use of iLearn

The unit guide and additional materials and announcements for the unit are available via iLearn.  Please ensure that you check ilearn and your university email account regularly to stay up to date. 

 

Lecture recordings

Lectures for CUL260 will be recorded via ECHO 360 and available through the ilearn site.  However, you should note that lectures in this unit are often interactive and obviously, discussions between students and discussions between students and lecture cannot be adequately captured by ECHO recordings.  Similarly, video clips are regularly used in lectures, but cannot be recorded on ECHO 360 for copyright reasons.  Links to clips will always be embedded in the Powerpoint slides for the unit, which will usually be uploaded onto ilearn just prior to the delivery of the lecture. If because of a disability or language difficulties you would like lecture slides earlier than this please speak to Nicole. 

Please think carefully if you choose not to attend lectures.  Attendance records will be taken in lectures and participation in lectures is considered when allocating marks for participation in the course.  If you choose not to attend lectures, you can demonstrate your participation listening carefully to the recording for the lecture you missed and posting 5 discussion questions to the discussion forum on the week's section of ilearn, by the Tuesday (day after the lecture), midnight. 

 

Particular learning needs

If you have particular learning needs that mean you would benefit from a different presentation of learning resources or other accommodations, please let Lara know as early as possible.  Student Wellbeing provided much support and many resources for students with disabilities - please do not be afraid to get in touch with them.  It is always helpful for tutors and lecturers know if you have particular learning needs - where possible they will amend their teaching strategies to accommodate your needs.

 

 

One to one consultations

During Week 10 there will be a compulsory 1:1 meeting with your tutor.

In addition to these times, Lara will normally be available for student consultations on Mondays from 1-2 pm. The room number will be announced in iLearn. If you cannot attend these times, please email lara.palombo@mq.edu.au to make an appointment.  

 

Feedback

There are many opportunities to receive feedback on your work in CUL260.  Some feedback you will receive will be specific to your own work - such as the detailed automated feedback you will receive along with your mark when the exam closes in Week 6.  Some feedback will be from your tutor, such as the verbal feedback you will receive on your essay outline when you meet your tutor in Week 10, or written feedback on your essay at the end of semester.  You will also receive feedback from your peers and tutor when you test out ideas in tutorials and respond to questions in lectures.  These feedback opportunities are designed to help you improve your work and develop your ideas. 

Unit Schedule

Week 1: What is health? (July 31)

Klein, Richard (2010) ‘What is Health and How Do You Get it?’ in Metzl, Jonathan & Anna Kirkland (eds.) Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality, New York: NYUP, pp.15-25.

Cheek, Julianne (2008) “Healthism: A New Conservatism”  Qualitative Health Research, Volume 18 Number 7 July 2008 974-982

 

Week 2: Medicalisation and demedicalisation (August 7)

Conrad, Peter & Kristin K. Barker (2010) ‘The Social Construction of Illness: Key Insights and Policy Implications’, Journal of Health & Social Behavior, 51:S, 67-79.

Halfmann, Drew (2011) ‘Recognizing Medicalization and Demedicalization: Discourses, Practices, and Identities’, Health, 16:2, 186-20

 

Week 3 Biopower (Aug 14)

Rose, Nikolas (2007) “Beyond medicalization” from The Lancet, 24 Feb to 2 Mar Vol 369 Issue 9562 pp.700-702

Foucault, Michel (1980) “The Politics of Health in the Eighteenth Century” in Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Writings 1972 – 1977 (edited by Colin Gordon) New York: Pantheon Books, pp 166 – 182

 

Week 4 The health consumer (Aug 21)

Tovey, Philip Karl Atkin & Timothy Milewa (2001) The individual and primary care: Service user, reflexive choice maker and collective actor, Critical Public Health, 11:2, 153-166

Topol, Eric (2015) The Patient Will See You Now, New York: Basic pp.3-12, 275-83

Matthews, Nicole & Sunderland Naomi (2017) Listening for Service Improvement in Primary and Acute Health Care Settings in Digital Storytelling in Health and Social Policy: Listening to Marginalised Voices, New York: Routledge, pp.88-121

 

Week 5 Health Promotion (Aug 28)

Ayo, Nike (2012) Understanding health promotion in a neoliberal climate and the making of health conscious citizens, Critical Public Health, 22:1, 99-105

Hallin, Daniel and Briggs, Charles (2015) “Transcending the medical/ media opposition in research on news coverage of health and medicine” Media, Culture & Society 2015, Vol. 37(1) 85–100

 

Week 6 Risk (Sept 4)

Diprose, Rosalind (2008) “Biopolitical technologies of prevention” Health Sociology Review 17(2) 141-50

Nelson, Alison L., Doune Macdonald & Rebecca Abbott (2012) ‘A risky business? Health and physical activity from the perspectives of urban Australian Indigenous young people,’ Health, Risk & Society, 14:4, 325-40.

 

Week 7 Maternity (Sept 11)

Lupton, Deborah (2012) ‘”Precious Cargo”: foetal subjects, risk and reproductive citizenship,’ Critical Public Health, 329-40.

Macvarish, Jan (2010) ‘The effect of ‘risk-thinking’ on the contemporary construction of teenage motherhood’, Health, Risk & Society, 12:4, 313-322

 

MID SEMESTER BREAK

 

Week 8 Masculinity (Oct 2)

Note: due to public holiday there will be no lecture this week.  Tutorials will run as usual.

Cranshaw, Paul (2009) ‘Critical Perspectives on the Health of Men: lessons from medical sociology,’ Critical Public Health, 19:3-4, 279-85.

O’Brien, R., K. Hunt & G. Hart (2009) ‘”The average Scottish man has a cigarette hanging out of his mouth, lying there with a portion of chips”: prospects for change in Scottish men’s constructions of masculinity and their health-related beliefs and behaviours’, Critical Public Health, 19:3-4, 363-81.

 

Week 9 Sex (Oct 9)

Gagnon, Marilou, Jean Daniel Jacob & Dave Holmes (2010) ‘Governing through (in)security: a critical analysis of a fear-based public health campaign’, Critical Public Health, 20:2, 245-56.

Polzer, Jessica C. & Susan Knabe (2012) ‘From Desire to Disease: Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) and the Medicalization of Nascent Female Sexuality’, Journal of Sex Research, 49:4, 344-52.

 

Week 10 Essay planning week (16 Oct)

There will be no lecture or tutorial this week.  Instead you will be scheduled a 5-10 m meeting with your tutor to discuss your essay plan during the week.

 

Week 11 Drinking (Oct 23)

Keane, Helen (2009) ‘Intoxication, harm and pleasure: an analysis of the Australian National Alcohol Strategy’, Critical Public Health, 19:2, 135-142

Rebecca Brown & Melissa Gregg (2012) The pedagogy of regret: Facebook, binge drinking and young women, Continuum, 26:3, 357-369

 

Week 12 Eating (Oct 30)

Deborah Lupton (2015) The pedagogy of disgust: the ethical, moral and

political implications of using disgust in public health campaigns, Critical Public Health, 25:1, 4-14  

Schneider, Tanja & Teresa Davis (2010) ‘Fostering a Hunger for Health: Food and the Self in Australian Women’s Weekly’, Health Sociology Review, 19:3, 285-303

 

Week 13 Revision week (Nov 6)

Final summary lecture.  There are no tutorials this week.  You will have the opportunity to meet with your tutor if you wish before submission of your essay on Nov 8.

 

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

  • Additional information MMCCS website https://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/faculties_and_departments/faculty_of_arts/department_ of_media_music_communication_and_cultural_studies/

    MMCCS Session Re-mark Application http://www.mq.edu.au/pubstatic/public/download/?id=167914 Information is correct at the time of publication

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which “health“ is understood and experienced across a range of contexts.
  • Interrogate key concepts around “health”, showing an awareness of debates around definitions of these terms
  • Outline a theoretically informed account of the relationship between forms of knowledge and experiences of embodied subjectivity and sociality
  • Apply key methods of critical analysis to evaluate social economic, legal and or medical practices which focus on bodily-being
  • Communicate effectively and ethically in a range of contexts and modes of writing

Assessment tasks

  • Take-home exam
  • Reading summaries
  • Essay plan & planning meeting
  • Essay
  • Active Contribution

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which “health“ is understood and experienced across a range of contexts.
  • Interrogate key concepts around “health”, showing an awareness of debates around definitions of these terms
  • Outline a theoretically informed account of the relationship between forms of knowledge and experiences of embodied subjectivity and sociality
  • Apply key methods of critical analysis to evaluate social economic, legal and or medical practices which focus on bodily-being
  • Evidence engagement with and reflection on the process of learning

Assessment tasks

  • Take-home exam
  • Essay plan & planning meeting
  • Essay

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Outline a theoretically informed account of the relationship between forms of knowledge and experiences of embodied subjectivity and sociality
  • Apply key methods of critical analysis to evaluate social economic, legal and or medical practices which focus on bodily-being
  • Evidence engagement with and reflection on the process of learning

Assessment tasks

  • Essay plan & planning meeting
  • Essay

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Apply key methods of critical analysis to evaluate social economic, legal and or medical practices which focus on bodily-being
  • Evidence engagement with and reflection on the process of learning

Assessment task

  • Essay

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Outline a theoretically informed account of the relationship between forms of knowledge and experiences of embodied subjectivity and sociality
  • Apply key methods of critical analysis to evaluate social economic, legal and or medical practices which focus on bodily-being
  • Communicate effectively and ethically in a range of contexts and modes of writing

Assessment tasks

  • Essay plan & planning meeting
  • Essay
  • Active Contribution

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Apply key methods of critical analysis to evaluate social economic, legal and or medical practices which focus on bodily-being

Assessment tasks

  • Essay plan & planning meeting
  • Essay
  • Active Contribution

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which “health“ is understood and experienced across a range of contexts.
  • Interrogate key concepts around “health”, showing an awareness of debates around definitions of these terms
  • Apply key methods of critical analysis to evaluate social economic, legal and or medical practices which focus on bodily-being
  • Communicate effectively and ethically in a range of contexts and modes of writing

Assessment task

  • Active Contribution

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Communicate effectively and ethically in a range of contexts and modes of writing
  • Evidence engagement with and reflection on the process of learning

Assessment tasks

  • Essay
  • Active Contribution

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Communicate effectively and ethically in a range of contexts and modes of writing
  • Evidence engagement with and reflection on the process of learning

Assessment tasks

  • Reading summaries
  • Essay plan & planning meeting
  • Essay
  • Active Contribution

Changes from Previous Offering

Changes in 2016 include: * Some changes to the ordering of lectures and changes to set readings  * setting back the date of the exam to the end of Week 6 to allow students longer to read and reflect on key ideas * increasing the number of reading summaries to ensure ongoing preparation for the take-home exam.  Weighting of the summaries remains the same, making these "low stakes" assessments that give students an opportunity to rehearse ideas with little risk.