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GEOS125 – Earth Dynamics

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Convenor, Lecturer
Nathan Daczko
Contact via iLearn discussion board
12 Wally's Walk Room 220
Lecturer, Tutor
Elena Belousova
Contact via email
12 Wally's Walk Room 225
Lecturer, Tutor
Cait Stuart
Contact via iLearn Discussion board; 9850-4715
12 Wally's Walk Room 210 (open plan)
Tutor
Jonathan Munnikhuis
Contact via email
12 Wally's Walk Room 210 (open plan)
Jennifer Rowland
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
GEOS125 external
Unit description Unit description
Discover how the solid Earth works – investigate the dynamic link between plate tectonics and Earth evolution. This introductory unit is suitable for all students including those wanting to try a natural science. It explores the composition and structure of our planet and the dynamic processes that change our environment. Students become skilled at geoscience techniques that permit detailed study of the Earth, and explore via case studies volcanoes and volcanic hazards, as well as economic geology. The unit provides a strong background in geoscience for further studies in geology, geophysics, geography, museum studies, geomorphology, astronomy and environmental science; and insights into Earth materials and their relationship to the environment for students of economics, physics, archaeology, chemistry, biology, marine science and education. This unit involves eye-opening field trips in tutorial classes around campus and a day trip across the Blue Mountains.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Developed an understanding of the scientific method
  2. Developed a capacity to employ appropriate geoscientific tools to solve problems and to interpret the results
  3. Developed an understanding of the tools and methods that are used in the identification of minerals and rocks
  4. Developed an understanding of how to read geology maps to draw cross-sections and interpret geological hisotory
  5. Improved competence in accessing, using and synthesising appropriate information
  6. Enhanced capacity to present ideas clearly with supporting evidence

General Assessment Information

The dates for submission of assessment tasks are listed on the schedule.

Extensions for case study report submission will be given only for illness or misadventure, which must be supported by documentation and a written request. This request should also indicate the extension period required. Case study reports submitted late without approval will be penalised 10% of the potential total mark per day late. Students must keep a photocopy of their reports.

Queries and appeals

In the first instance, contact the unit convenor if there are any questions about the assessment tasks themselves, or about the comments and grades that you receive for your assignments or reports. You are permitted to appeal against your final grade in any of your units. Before initiating an appeal, discuss your unit grade fully with the unit convenor.

The Dangers of Plagiarism and how to avoid it

The integrity of learning and scholarship depends on a code of conduct governing good practice and acceptable academic behaviour. One of the most important elements of good practice involves acknowledging carefully the people whose ideas we have used, borrowed, or developed. All students and scholars are bound by these rules because all scholarly work depends in one way or another on the work of others.

Therefore, there is nothing wrong in using the work of others as a basis for your own work, nor is it evidence of inadequacy on your part, provided you do not attempt to pass off someone else's work as your own.

To maintain good academic practice, so that you may be given credit for your own efforts, and so that your own contribution can be properly appreciated and evaluated, you should acknowledge your sources and you should ALWAYS:

  1. State clearly in the appropriate form where you found the material on which you have based your work.
  2. Acknowledge the people whose concepts, experiments, or results you have extracted, developed, or summarised, even if you put these ideas into your own words.
  3. Avoid excessive copying of passages by another author, even where the source is acknowledged. Find another form of words to show that you have thought about the material and understood it, but remember to state clearly where you found the ideas.

If you take and use the work of another person without clearly stating or acknowledging your source, you are falsely claiming that material as your own work and committing an act of PLAGIARISM. This is a very serious violation of good practice and an offence for which you will be penalised.

YOU WILL BE GUILTY OF PLAGIARISM if you do any of the following in an assignment, or in any piece of work which is to be assessed, without clearly acknowledging your source(s) for each quotation or piece of borrowed material:

  1. Copy out part(s) of any document or audio-visual material, including computer-based material.
  2. Use or extract someone else's concepts or experimental results or conclusions, even if you put them in your own words.
  3. Copy out or take ideas from the work of another student, even if you put the borrowed material in your own words.
  4. Submit substantially the same final version of any material as a fellow student. On occasions, you may be encouraged to prepare your work with someone else, but the final form of the assignment you hand in must be your own independent endeavour.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Weekly quiz 20% each week
Case Study I: Mt Todd 15% 04/09/2017
Case Study II: Hartley 10% 30/10/2017
Hartley quiz and field notes 5% week 12 lecture
Final examination 50% to be advised

Weekly quiz

Due: each week
Weighting: 20%

The weekly online quizzes will examine 1) the lecture topics of the previous week, 2) compulsory pre-reading of information for the next laboratory practical class, 3) assigned weekly textbook readings, and 4) revision questions from any preceding week.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Developed an understanding of the tools and methods that are used in the identification of minerals and rocks
  • Developed an understanding of how to read geology maps to draw cross-sections and interpret geological hisotory

Case Study I: Mt Todd

Due: 04/09/2017
Weighting: 15%

Mt. Todd case study: You will be given specific details of what is expected when you begin each case study. Generally, each case study will involve a written report and your use of English and referencing the source of your ideas is important. Details of the required formatting of reports are given in the unit of study booklet (Part III – Case Studies).


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Developed an understanding of the scientific method
  • Developed a capacity to employ appropriate geoscientific tools to solve problems and to interpret the results
  • Developed an understanding of how to read geology maps to draw cross-sections and interpret geological hisotory
  • Improved competence in accessing, using and synthesising appropriate information
  • Enhanced capacity to present ideas clearly with supporting evidence

Case Study II: Hartley

Due: 30/10/2017
Weighting: 10%

Report for Hartley Case study: You will be given specific details of what is expected when you begin each case study. Generally, each case study will involve a written report and your use of English and referencing the source of your ideas is important. Details of the required formatting of reports are given in the unit of study booklet (Part III – Case Studies).


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Developed an understanding of the scientific method
  • Developed a capacity to employ appropriate geoscientific tools to solve problems and to interpret the results
  • Developed an understanding of how to read geology maps to draw cross-sections and interpret geological hisotory
  • Improved competence in accessing, using and synthesising appropriate information
  • Enhanced capacity to present ideas clearly with supporting evidence

Hartley quiz and field notes

Due: week 12 lecture
Weighting: 5%

Hartley Quiz - to be completed during the lecture in week 12.

Hartley field notes - to be handed in at the conclusion of the Hartley field trip.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Developed an understanding of the scientific method
  • Developed a capacity to employ appropriate geoscientific tools to solve problems and to interpret the results
  • Developed an understanding of the tools and methods that are used in the identification of minerals and rocks
  • Enhanced capacity to present ideas clearly with supporting evidence

Final examination

Due: to be advised
Weighting: 50%

Final examination (2 hours long): The final exam will cover material from the lectures, textbook readings, class exercises and case studies. Questions will draw on information and ideas from different modules to give an integrated view of the unit. The exam will include questions that ask you to apply your knowledge to interpret and solve problems. Past exam papers are available on the MQ Library website.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Developed a capacity to employ appropriate geoscientific tools to solve problems and to interpret the results
  • Developed an understanding of the tools and methods that are used in the identification of minerals and rocks
  • Developed an understanding of how to read geology maps to draw cross-sections and interpret geological hisotory
  • Enhanced capacity to present ideas clearly with supporting evidence

Delivery and Resources

INTRODUCTION

Earth Dynamics is a hands on unit of study, that sets out to acquaint you with the essential features of the materials that constitute the Earth, processes that mould the Earth’s surface, and the interaction of people and the geologic environment. The unit is an introduction to geology and not only forms the vital stepping stone for future studies in geology, but also sets out to give students from other disciplines a basic understanding of the physical Earth that will be helpful in studies and careers in environmental science, geomorphology, geophysics, biology, geodesy, gemology and economics.

We aim to help you develop the skills necessary for study of the physical Earth. By the end of the unit, you should have the skills to:

  • Make critical observations for yourself in the field
  • Identify minerals and rocks
  • Determine geometric relationships between rock units, as depicted on simple geological maps
  • Use geological information to better understand the physical Earth

These different threads come together via an understanding of the cyclic nature of rock-forming and rock degrading processes of our planet, in terms of the Plate Tectonic Theory.

Geology is a vital, living science that touches our everyday lives. For example, materials such as ore deposits, diamonds, coal and petroleum are essential to our modern civilisation, and precious stones add to our appreciation of nature's beauty. Processes such as volcanism, earthquakes, landslides and erosion may dramatically affect our wellbeing. Knowledge you gain of these materials and processes, based on scientific approaches of observation, testing and evaluation, will assist you towards a better understanding of this planet, Earth.

 

STUDY PROGRAM

Students coming into this unit have a variety of backgrounds, since there are no set pre-requisites. Some of you will have no geology or physical geography at all in your previous studies, others will have taken these subjects at HSC level, and still others will have completed GEOS112 Planet Earth here at Macquarie. However, previous studies in geology and related subjects are not necessary and in terms of your geological knowledge, by the end of this unit it should not matter what background you had before you started. In spite of this, inevitably in the early stages some of you might find many more new concepts to come to grips with than others. DO NOT BE DISCOURAGED, as by persevering into the unit of study, you will gain the satisfaction of seeing how the pieces of the overall Earth puzzle start to come together.

This unit concentrates on six major themes that will be explored and revisited in various ways throughout the unit. These themes include:

  • Deep time (prehistorical and ancient geological past)
  • Plate tectonics
  • The rock cycle
  • Geological skills e.g. mapping and mineral/rock recognition
  • How geoscience can be used to solve some of the problems of the 21st century

There are three modules that investigate different aspects of geoscience. The main ideas and objectives for the modules are:

Module 1: Tools of Geoscience (4 weeks)

By the end of this unit students should be able to:

  • Understand that the rocks we see today have undergone change through geologic time and are still undergoing change (this is known as the rock-cycle)
  • Recognise that there are 3 main groups of rocks (igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic) and be able to distinguish typical hand specimen examples of each type (Note: this skill will be reinforced throughout the unit)
  • Understand the basic concepts of the plate tectonic theory and appreciate that it is the major unifying idea of geoscience
  • Describe the main tools of geoscience and give examples of how they are used: e.g. mapping, satellite imagery, air photos, geophysical investigations, Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
  • Read and interpret topographic maps, and understand how contours are constructed and how to interpret them
  • Use geological maps including legends, scales, grid references, etc. to solve simple problems and navigate
  • Understand that maps are two dimensional representations of a three dimensional world, and the graphical techniques that are used to illustrate what is under the surface (e.g. making and interpreting geological cross sections)
  • Explain the sequence of events that led to the geological configuration of an area (geological history)

Module 2: Hot Rocks (4 weeks)

By the end of this unit students should be able to:

  • Analyse volcanic processes, the landforms produced, and volcanic hazards
  • Account for differences between volcanoes in terms of lava type (chemistry, appearance, explosiveness, etc) and their geographic position in relation to plate tectonic theory (e.g. boundary, intra-plate, etc)
  • Examine intrusive igneous processes (e.g. magma composition and behaviour), and the features these processes produce
  • Recognise common volcanic and intrusive igneous rocks and be able to use a classification scheme to identify them; interpret the origin of igneous rocks from hand specimens and field relations
  • Describe and appreciate the significance of deeper Earth processes (e.g. mantle plumes)
  • Understand the impact of plate tectonic theory on igneous processes
  • Identify the main silicate rock-forming minerals
  • Comprehend the basic chemical structure of the main groups of minerals (e.g. silica tetrahedra) and how this structure determines their appearance and physical properties
  • Illustrate how knowledge of igneous processes can be useful to people (e.g. creation of ore minerals, “hot dry rock” as a source of energy; building materials)

Module 3: Rocks Under Stress (4 weeks)

By the end of this unit students should be able to:

  • Comprehend that metamorphism causes change to existing rocks by the application of heat and pressure
  • Comprehend that rocks slowly change form and shape under the application of forces
  • Match parent rocks with metamorphosed equivalents
  • Establish that rock microstructure and the existence of particular minerals indicate that rocks have undergone change
  • Discern the difference between contact and regional metamorphism and be able to distinguish this difference in hand specimens showing a visible difference
  • Understand the concept of metamorphic grade
  • Use and interpret geological maps with intrusive rock bodies and simple structural features
  • Describe how knowledge of metamorphic processes can be of benefit to people
  • Understand the relationship between metamorphism, deformation and plate tectonic theory

 

STUDENT LEARNING EXPERIENCES

This unit can be seen as two interconnected streams. A lecture stream that will give a broad overview of the topic, provide background information and introduce new ideas and concepts that link in with the other stream. Parallel to the lecture stream are a series of laboratory and field-based activities and case study workshops.

There will be two case studies. These case studies will be extended enquiries into real geo-scientific problems, extending over several weeks. These problems are different to the ones that you would typically find in textbooks, and more closely resemble the investigations that scientists face in the real world, with many interacting factors and a number of possible solutions.

Each of the case studies will allow you to explore the ideas in depth and will provide an effective and, we hope, enjoyable method of learning. There is also the added benefit of providing you with opportunities to develop generic skills such as problem solving, teamwork, communication, accessing and evaluating information and in using scientific approaches to solve problems.

You will be working individually or in small teams for each case study, both in attempting to solve the problem and to produce a final report. The reports will be awarded marks both for your individual synthesis and/or group work. You will be expected to do substantial research outside of the scheduled time (e.g. library and/or web-based literature search).

 

FIELD TRIPS

During this unit of study you will be required to participate in two field trips: one on-campus and one off-campus. These excursions form an essential part of the unit and give you an introduction to field geology. You should take special note of the following:

Equipment: The basic requirements are a hand lens, magnet, and some method of testing mineral hardness (e.g. a pocket knife, copper coin, etc.). Buy a geological hammer only if you intend to continue in a geological field. As the weather is not always kind, note taking can be a problem if ballpoint or ink pens are used. Pencils are recommended. Bring several, and keep them sharp. Learn to be neat and tidy in these initial stages, and form a good habit early. It is much easier to discipline yourself now than to change habits later.

Clothing: Everyone has their own idea of comfort, but some common features of field clothing are obvious. Wear sensible, tough footwear, such as boots or strong sneakers. Thongs, fashion shoes and street shoes are useless and unacceptable. We will be walking over some irregular rock outcrops and may be in snake-infested areas. We cannot guarantee good quality weather; so you should have waterproof clothing. Long trousers, such as jeans, are safer than shorts. Bring a hat and sunscreen.

 

TEXTS AND REFERENCES

Unit of study booklet

This is available through the University Co-Operative Bookshop and contains the laboratory practicals and case study assignments. The booklet is essential for you to have to follow the unit. The completed worksheets are invaluable as an aid during revision for the examination.

Textbook

The recommended text is:

Tarbuck, E.J., Lutgens, F.K. and Tasa, D. (2016). Earth: An introduction to Physical Geology (12th Global). Pearson . ISBN 9781292161839

This gives more background information, often written from a different perspective from the lectures. It also contains photographs and diagrams for use in the lectures and laboratory exercises. In the library you may find several other basic textbooks on Physical Geology that will be of use to you. The other text mentioned is Merali, Z. and Skinner B.J. Visualizing Earth Science. Wiley. ISBN 978-0-471-74705-5.

Reading List

You may find the following books helpful for reference. They should provide useful supportive material to the lectures, case studies and laboratory exercises, and supplement the prescribed textbook and the Unit of Study booklet.

Earth Dynamics is a subject relying heavily on observation, so it will be of great help to look at a variety of illustrations of the features that are covered in the unit of study. The books listed below are generally well illustrated, with striking colour photographs and diagrams.

** indicates a book in Special Reserve in the Library; * indicates a book on 3-day loan.

**Branagan, D.F. and Packham, G.H., 2000. Field geology of NSW. NSW Dept of Mineral Resources. Sydney. QE45.B7

*Busch, R.M., Tarbuck, E.J. and Lutgens, F.K, 1993. A study guide to accompany "The earth — an introduction to physical geology". Merrill. QE28.2.T37

*Cattermole, P., 2000. Building Planet Earth. Cambridge University Press. QE26.2.C384

*Hamblin, W.K. 1998. Earth's Dynamic Systems. Macmillan (8th Ed.) QE28.2.H35

*Hamblin, W.K. and Howard, J.D. 1995. Exercises in Physical Geology. QE28.2.H36

**Herbert, C. and Helby, R., 1980. A Guide to the Sydney Basin. Geological Survey of NSW Bulletin 26. QE341.N4

**Kimberley, M.M and Kimberley, S.J. 1995. Study guide to Skinner/Porter's The Dynamic Earth: an introduction to physical geology. Third Edition. Wiley (3rd Ed) QE28.2K56

*Merritts, D.J., De Wet, A., and Menking, K., 1998. Environmental Geology: an earth system science approach. Freeman, New York. QE38.M47

*Monroe, J.S. and Wicander, R. 1992 Physical Geology — exploring the earth. Harper Educational Publ.; West Publ. Co St. Paul. QE28.2.M655

*Montgomery, C.W., 1993. Physical Geology. Wm C. Brown (3rd Ed.) QE28.2.M66

*Morrison, R., 1988. Voyage of the Great Southern Ark. Ure Smith Press. QE340.M67

*Morton, R.D., 1995. Student’s Companion to Skinner and Porter’s The Dynamic Earth; an introduction to Physical Geology, Third Edition. Wiley QE28.2.S552

*Murck, B.W., Skinner, B.J. and Porter, S.C., 1996. Environmental Geology. Wiley and Sons, New York. QE38.M87/1996

*Plummer, C.C. and McGeary, D., 1999. Physical Geology. Wm C. Brown Publ., Iowa (8th Ed.). QE28.2.P58

*Press, F. and Siever, R. 1998. Understanding Earth. Freeman, New York (2nd Ed.) (replaces Earth, 4th Ed.). QE28.P9

**Scheibner, E., 1999. The geological evolution of New South Wales. Dept of Mineral Resources. QE341.S296

**Skinner, B.J. and Porter, S.C., 2000. The Dynamic Earth: an introduction to physical geology. Wiley , 4th Ed. QE28.2.S55

**Skinner, B.J., Porter, S.C. and Botkin, D.B., 1999. The Blue Planet. Wiley , 2nd Ed. QB631.S57

*Smith, D.G., 1981. The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Earth Sciences Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge. QE26.2.C35

*Stanley, S.M., 1989. Earth and life through time. W.H. Freeman and Company, N.Y. QE28.3.S73

*Tarbuck, E.J., Lutgens, F.K. and Tasa, D. (2016). Earth: An introduction to Physical Geology (12th Global). Pearson . ISBN 9781292161839

**Van Andel, T.H., 1994. New views of an old planet: continental drift and the history of the earth. Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge (2nd Ed.). QE26.2.V36

*Veevers, J.J., 2000. Billion-year earth history of Australia and neighbours in Gondwanaland. GEMOC Press, Sydney. QE340.B55

CD-ROMS

**Dunning, J and Onesti, L.J., 1998. Earth Matters. Freeman and Co., New York. QE38.D8

**Tasa, D., 1999. Illustrated dictionary of earth science. Tasa Graphic Arts. QE5.I45

Library Loans

The Library at Macquarie will have provided you with information on library loans. The procedures differ for metropolitan and country students. Please familiarise yourself with the procedures appropriate in your case. If you have any enquiries contact the Library on (02) 9850-7500.

Unit Schedule

Week Date (Mon) Lecture (Thu 3-5) Textbook Reading* Laboratory Practical (Mon 11-2 or Fri 8-11, 11-2, or 3-6) Case Study Assignment
1 31 Jul Introduction – Meet Planet Earth 1 E – 1 VES

Practical 1: Introduction to Maps

 
2 7 Aug Plate Tectonics: The Unifying Theme 2 E - 7 VES Practical 2: Campus Excursion Mt Todd
3 14 Aug Hydrocarbons and other fuels 23 E Practical 3: Geological Maps Mt Todd
4 21 Aug Atoms, Elements, Minerals, Rocks 3 E - 2,3 VES Practical 4: Minerals and Mineral Properties Mt Todd
5 28 Aug Volcanoes and Volcanic Hazards 5,13 E - 9 VES Practical 5: Volcanic (Extrusive) Rocks Mt Todd
6 4 Sep Plutons and Intrusive Activity 4,13,14 E - 9 VES Practical 6: Plutonic (Intrusive) Rocks  
7 11 Sep Mineral resources 23 E Practical 7:  Minerals of Economic Significance  
Break          
8 2 Oct Metamorphism and Metamorphic Rocks 8E - 3 VES Practical 8: Metamorphic Minerals Hartley
9 9 Oct Changing Rocks and Crustal Deformation 8,10 E - 3 VES Practical 9: Metamorphic Rocks Hartley
10 16 Oct Earthquakes and Earthquake Hazards 11 E - 8 VES Practical 10: Exam revision - Maps Hartley
11 23 Oct Earth's Interior 11,12 E - 8 VES Practical 11: Exam Revision - Rocks Hartley
12 30 Oct Geochemical Tools and Dating the Earth (+ Hartley Case Study Quiz) 9 E - 10 VES Practical 12: Introduction to Geochemistry  
13 6 Nov Geochemistry 9 E - 10 VES Practical 13: Geochemistry  

 *Textbook Readings are chapters from Earth: An introduction to Physical Geology (E) and Visualizing Earth Science (VES).

IMPORTANT DATES:

Week 6 – Monday September 4th: Report for Mt Todd Case Study is due

Week 9 – Saturday October 7th or Sunday October 8th: Full-day field trip to Hartley

Week 12 – Monday 30th October: Report for Hartley Case Study is due

Week 12 – Hartley Case Study Quiz during second hour of lecture

Exam: To be advised once the examinations timetable is drawn up

 

TIME ALLOCATION

According to Macquarie University guidelines, you are required to spend 39 hours of study per credit point. For GEOS125 this works out to approximately two hours per week in lectures, approximately two hours per week at the practical laboratory sessions, one day on the off campus field trip and approximately six to seven hours per week doing at home study. Conscientious use of this time, particularly if it is spread over the whole semester will provide its reward.

 

EVALUATION

We are interested in your ideas about how the unit is progressing and how it can be improved. At certain points during the semester, you will be invited to fill out a brief survey to give us some feedback on how you find the unit content and presentation methods.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Developed a capacity to employ appropriate geoscientific tools to solve problems and to interpret the results
  • Developed an understanding of the tools and methods that are used in the identification of minerals and rocks
  • Developed an understanding of how to read geology maps to draw cross-sections and interpret geological hisotory
  • Improved competence in accessing, using and synthesising appropriate information
  • Enhanced capacity to present ideas clearly with supporting evidence

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly quiz
  • Case Study I: Mt Todd
  • Case Study II: Hartley
  • Hartley quiz and field notes

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Improved competence in accessing, using and synthesising appropriate information

Assessment tasks

  • Case Study I: Mt Todd
  • Case Study II: Hartley

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Developed an understanding of the scientific method
  • Developed a capacity to employ appropriate geoscientific tools to solve problems and to interpret the results
  • Developed an understanding of the tools and methods that are used in the identification of minerals and rocks
  • Developed an understanding of how to read geology maps to draw cross-sections and interpret geological hisotory
  • Improved competence in accessing, using and synthesising appropriate information
  • Enhanced capacity to present ideas clearly with supporting evidence

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly quiz
  • Case Study I: Mt Todd
  • Case Study II: Hartley
  • Hartley quiz and field notes
  • Final examination

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Developed an understanding of the scientific method
  • Developed a capacity to employ appropriate geoscientific tools to solve problems and to interpret the results
  • Developed an understanding of the tools and methods that are used in the identification of minerals and rocks
  • Developed an understanding of how to read geology maps to draw cross-sections and interpret geological hisotory
  • Improved competence in accessing, using and synthesising appropriate information
  • Enhanced capacity to present ideas clearly with supporting evidence

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly quiz
  • Case Study I: Mt Todd
  • Case Study II: Hartley
  • Hartley quiz and field notes
  • Final examination

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Developed an understanding of how to read geology maps to draw cross-sections and interpret geological hisotory
  • Improved competence in accessing, using and synthesising appropriate information
  • Enhanced capacity to present ideas clearly with supporting evidence

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly quiz
  • Case Study I: Mt Todd
  • Case Study II: Hartley
  • Hartley quiz and field notes
  • Final examination

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Developed an understanding of how to read geology maps to draw cross-sections and interpret geological hisotory
  • Improved competence in accessing, using and synthesising appropriate information
  • Enhanced capacity to present ideas clearly with supporting evidence

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly quiz
  • Case Study I: Mt Todd
  • Case Study II: Hartley
  • Hartley quiz and field notes
  • Final examination

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Improved competence in accessing, using and synthesising appropriate information

Assessment tasks

  • Case Study I: Mt Todd
  • Case Study II: Hartley

Changes from Previous Offering

This year sees some changes to the GEOS125 offering and we ask for your patience and feedback. We are shortening the laboratory practical component from 3 hours to 2 hours. We are adding an extra one hour to the lecture slot, with the aim is that this will be flexibly used to accommodate extra lecture material, short tasks involving practice as skills, and time to discuss the case study assignments.

Presentation of Case Study reports

You are required to research, prepare and write the case study reports at the standard expected at tertiary level. Since most of what you learn is tested in written form, it is essential that you learn to write effectively. Organisation is the key to achieving this, and the following steps should assist you.

Preparation

  1. Determine what is required in the case study report. Make sure you understand each word used to ensure that you are writing to the topic set, not to one of your own invention.
  2. Read the relevant unit material and generate a list of key words, which will help you locate other references in the Library. Do this early. Remember that reference books may be hard to find if you leave your library research too late.
  3. When taking notes from a reference always note the bibliographical information and Call Number. If you write down a quotation, take a note of the page it was on. There is nothing more frustrating than having to look back through a book for one sentence.

The Outline

  1. Introduction. Define terms and outline your approach to the topic.
  2. Discussion. This section is for explanation and discussion of the topic. It may help to write down a list of major points that will become your paragraphs, so that you can arrange your notes under each point.
  3. Conclusion. This is not a reiteration of the discussion, but a summary statement that rounds off the report.

The Drafts (at least one — more probably two or three)

  1. Keep referring back to the question — have you strayed from the topic?
  2. Single sentences or paragraphs should not express too many ideas. A logical development of your theme should be the aim throughout the essay.
  3. In your initial draft, do not worry too much about the word limit. It is a simple matter to cut down extraneous or repetitive material in subsequent rewrites — in fact this should be your aim.
  4. Support your statements with facts and references.
  5. References: quotations should be used only if the point being made is vital to your argument and if you could not express it better yourself. If you paraphrase, you must acknowledge your authority as you would when quoting directly – after the paraphrased section or quotation, i.e. (Smith, 1981, p.132). Make sure you document this reference in your Bibliography or list of References. Remember, plagiarism is cheating! All references must be clearly documented at the end of your assignment. For more details on referencing of material see Appendix 2 of your Unit of Study Booklet.

The Final Product

  1. If possible, allow a few days between writing your final draft and the finished report, to allow you to critically read and edit it. There is a danger that if it is too fresh in your mind, you will read what you think is there, rather than what you have actually written. Read your final draft through several times — once for fluency and clarity of ideas, once for punctuation and once for spelling. For clarification of problems, refer to an authority such as the Australian Government Publishing Service Style Manual.
  2. Write (or type — learn now if you are an untidy writer) your assignment for submission, and then check it again. Is there a title, your name on each page, page numbers, etc.?
  3. Submit your case study report on or before the due date to the GEOS125 assignment box in the ELS Centre (level 1, E7A), and keep a digital copy or photocopy. Assignment boxes are located in the reception area of the ELS Centre (Room 101), which is on the ground floor at the western end of building E7A.  Campus maps are available at http://www.bgo.mq.edu.au/campus.htm. The Centre opens from 8.30am to 5.30pm on Monday to Friday. An after hours submission box is located at the entrance to E7A, (a labelled slot in the door nearest to E5A). All assignments are to be submitted before class on the date specified and must include a completed and signed coversheet stapled to the front cover. The Assignment Cover Sheets are partly filled out for you at the end of the unit outline or alternatively, these can be downloaded from the web at www.els.mq.edu.au, click on ELS Assignment Cover Sheet.

Formatting

  1. All typed text submitted for case studies is to be 12 point font at 1.5 line spacing. Margins should be approximately 2cm. Place your name in the header and number each page.
  2. Page limits should be strictly adhered to.
  3. In all that you hand in, marks will be given for “communication”; that is how effectively you communicate your ideas. This will include how well your text/maps/profiles/sketches convey your concepts, and how well written your report is (including correct use of English and of referencing procedures – see Appendix 2).

Now, perhaps, you can see how important it is to start the whole process early if you are to do a good job. If you are having problems along the way, consult your Tutor, and consult a how-to-do-it text.