Logo Students

CUL 221 – Australian Film and Television

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

Pdf icon Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor, Lecturer, Tutor
Anthony Lambert
Contact via anthony.lambert@mq.edu.au
Y3A253
Email for appointment
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
12cp at 100 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
What do we mean by 'being Australian'? In Australia, film and television are used by the creative industries and viewing public to create, share, critique and sustain ideas of identity and space, and to mediate associated cultural concerns. This unit focuses on constructions of 'Australianness' drawn from these Australian contexts, using cultural-critical frameworks to explore the production and consumption of Australian film and television locally and globally. In addition, by canvassing themes or representation, genre, style, policy, history and industrial practice, this unit explores the trajectories and texts of Australian film and television as well as the contemporary preoccupations of both. The production of identity, Indigeneity, gender, sexuality, race, religion and politics from an Australian perspective is explored through a number of Australian feature films, documentaries and television programs. These are filtered through critical perspectives from across the broad range of Cultural Studies to interrogate how 'being Australian' is performed as a complex phenomenon.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Develop scholarly and thematic familiarity (contemporary and historical) of Cultural Studies with respect to Australian film and television.
  2. Analyse Australian screen texts and associated cultural practices (Australian spaces, media, scholarly work, social and historical phenomena).
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the politicised aspects of Australian life: how definitions of Australian culture and identity work with respect to on-screen representation, texts, technologies, industries and lived realities.
  4. Identify the production of 'Australianness' through discourses of nationalism and social inclusion.
  5. Review critically, analyse and synthesise findings in written and creative form, as well as faciliate and participate in discussions and presentations.
  6. Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form.
  7. Identify issues specific to Cultural Studies practice, including ethical relations to others, social justice and equity, and the appreciation of diversity.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Surveys 5% In class: weeks 2 and 12
Presentation 25% Ongoing
Journal 30% Online: 25th May
Quarterly Tests 40% Online: Weeks 3, 6, 9 and 12

Surveys

Due: In class: weeks 2 and 12
Weighting: 5%

Outline

Students complete short answers to a series of reflective suggestions and factual questions at the beginning and the end of the semester.

Submission Requirements

The first survey will be distributed in the week one lecture and will be due for submission in the first tutorial.The second survey will be completed online and will respond to material from the second half of the course.

Late Submissions - Guidelines

Tasks 10% or less. No extensions will be granted. Students who have not submitted the task prior to the deadline will be awarded a mark of 0 for the task, except for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

Criteria

This is a pass/fail exercise based on completion to a satisfactory level by the due dates. The first survey is used as an exercise to help identify students who may require extra help. The second survey is used to gauge overall comprehension and the effectiveness of teaching exercises and content.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Develop scholarly and thematic familiarity (contemporary and historical) of Cultural Studies with respect to Australian film and television.
  • Analyse Australian screen texts and associated cultural practices (Australian spaces, media, scholarly work, social and historical phenomena).
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form.
  • Identify issues specific to Cultural Studies practice, including ethical relations to others, social justice and equity, and the appreciation of diversity.

Presentation

Due: Ongoing
Weighting: 25%

Outline

An oral presentation analysing one film and one television program that speaks to the weekly themes.You will lead the tutorial for fifteen minutes. Your tutor will allocate weeks and dates in the first tutorial and the exercises will begin in the second week.

Submission Requirements

This is an in-class exercise and there are no written components. You should use visual aids and/or clips to assist in your exploration of film, television and the weekly themes and concepts. You will be marked solely on what you do in class and individual grades/ feedback will be provided via the iLearn site on a rolling basis.

Late Submissions - Guidelines

Tasks above 10%.No extensions will be granted. Students who submit late work without an approved Disruption to Studies extension will receive a penalty of 10% per day. This penalty does not apply for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

Criteria

You must present the weekly themes creatively by offering an analysis of two texts one Australian film, and one Australian television program - (think creatively about what constitutes an Australian film or TV text – think about the broad range of genres and styles within each). Your choice of screen texts must;

1) offer both industrial historical contexts of each, and 2) place each text in a relationship with the critical materials and concepts of the specific week. At the end you will allow at least five minutes for the group to ask questions and respond to what you have done. Your tutor will grade you on a series of criteria including conceptual understanding (use the readings and your own research), analytical skills, originality, presentation and group engagement.

Seek assistance from your tutor as soon as possible if you have any problems.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Analyse Australian screen texts and associated cultural practices (Australian spaces, media, scholarly work, social and historical phenomena).
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the politicised aspects of Australian life: how definitions of Australian culture and identity work with respect to on-screen representation, texts, technologies, industries and lived realities.
  • Review critically, analyse and synthesise findings in written and creative form, as well as faciliate and participate in discussions and presentations.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form.

Journal

Due: Online: 25th May
Weighting: 30%

Outline

Students will keep a written weekly journal documenting their own responses to the set film or television screenings from weeks 1 through to (and including) week 10, using the criteria in iLearn and the weekly questions under each banner. Each entry is to be no longer than 250 words.

Submission Requirements

The full journal is due online by 6pm on May 19th, as one document submitted via the 'journal' link on the unit iLearn page.

Late Submissions - Guidelines

Tasks above 10%.No extensions will be granted. Students who submit late work without an approved Disruption to Studies extension will receive a penalty of 10% per day. This penalty does not apply for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

Criteria

Using the weekly questions on iLearn, your journal responses will offer -

1) an understanding of the content/narrative

2) an understanding of important industrial and/or social contexts that shape the text

3) any noticeable textual/stylistic features and

4) an account of the relationship between the screening and the weekly themes from the lectures and the readings.

If you quote/cite specific material you must reference appropriately. All weekly screenings must be included. Each entry is graded out of 3, and each missing entry will lose 3 marks. The overall word limit should not exceed 2500 words.

  


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Analyse Australian screen texts and associated cultural practices (Australian spaces, media, scholarly work, social and historical phenomena).
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the politicised aspects of Australian life: how definitions of Australian culture and identity work with respect to on-screen representation, texts, technologies, industries and lived realities.
  • Review critically, analyse and synthesise findings in written and creative form, as well as faciliate and participate in discussions and presentations.
  • Identify issues specific to Cultural Studies practice, including ethical relations to others, social justice and equity, and the appreciation of diversity.

Quarterly Tests

Due: Online: Weeks 3, 6, 9 and 12
Weighting: 40%

Outline

Students will complete four online tests throughout the course of the semester.

Submission Requirements

The tests are administered online, in weeks 3, 6, 9 and 12 via the associated links on iLearn. Students  must complete each test within the designated time and only one attempt is allowed. Contact the tutor if any disruption or legitimate error presents itself (with screen shots attached). The first two tests will allow fifteen minutes for completion, and the second two tests will be ten minutes long with an increased level of difficulty. Grades/ feedback are provided instantly after completion of each quiz exercise.

Tasks 10% or less. No extensions will be granted. Students who have not submitted the task prior to the deadline will be awarded a mark of 0 for the task, except for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved. As each test is worth 10%, if you fail to complete or attempt any test by the due date (without such approval), you will lose 10% for each one missed.

Criteria

The tests comprise a range of true/false responses, factual answers, and short responses to critical propositions and observations. Each test covers material from three weeks of the semester; specific topics, lectures, screenings and reading material up to and including the final week. Test 1 covers: Australianness, National identity, and Indigeneity. Test 2 covers: Multiculturalism, Screening Oz, and Spaces. Test 3 covers: Migration/Detention and Gender. Test 4 covers: Sexuality, Religion and Badlands.

As the tests are timed, students are advised to revise readings, lecture notes and screenings prior to commencing online. Students who attend tutorials, observe weekly presentations and engage in the class discussions are better equipped to complete the tests in a timely manner and to a higher standard.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Develop scholarly and thematic familiarity (contemporary and historical) of Cultural Studies with respect to Australian film and television.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the politicised aspects of Australian life: how definitions of Australian culture and identity work with respect to on-screen representation, texts, technologies, industries and lived realities.
  • Identify the production of 'Australianness' through discourses of nationalism and social inclusion.

Delivery and Resources

 Delivery: Daytime, Internal   

Technologies Used: iLearn, Echo360, Kanopy

Times and Locations for Lectures, Tutorials and Screenings

For current updates, lecture times and classrooms please consult the MQ Timetables website: http://www.timetables.mq.edu.au.

Lectures:  Tuesday 4pm-5pm E7B T5

Tutorials:  Thursdays for 1 hr (times as per enrolment).

Screenings: The required weekly screenings are done in your own time, using the Kanopy streaming links/web links  provided in iLearn (or by using the library website). You must watch each title before each appropriate tutorial.

Required and recommended resources

CUL 221 has set readings for each weekly topic which you must read and study.

Week One:  

Ryan, M. (2010) Towards an understanding of Australian genre cinema and entertainment: Beyond the limitations of ‘Ozploitation’ discourse, Continuum, 24:6, pp. 843-854.

Bye, S. (2007) 'Watching Television in Australia: A Story of Innocence and Experience', Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture 4:4, pp. 65-83.

Week Two:           

Ward, S. and T. O’Regan (2011 ) ‘Defining a national brand: Australian television drama and the global television market’, Journal of Australian Studies, 35:1, pp. 33-47.

Price, E. (2010) Reinforcing the myth: Constructing Australian identity in ‘reality TV’, Continuum, 24:3, 451-459

Week Three:      

Rekhari, S. (2008) 'The "Other" in Film: Exclusions of Aboriginal Identity from Australian Cinema', Visual Anthropology, 21:2, pp. 125-135.

Hartley, J. (2004) 'Television, Nation and Indigenous Media', Television & New Media 5: 1, pp. 7-25.

Week Four:           

Olivia Khoo (2008) ‘Cinemas of value: multicultural realism in Asian Australian cinema’, Studies in Australasian Cinema, 2:2, pp. 141-156.

Klocker, N. (2014) Ethnic Diversity within Australian Homes: Has Television Caught up to Social Reality?, Journal of Intercultural Studies, 35:1, pp. 34-52.

Week Five:              

Lambert, A. (2009) ‘Landless White Women: Tracking a Non-Aboriginal Landscape Tradition in Australian Cinema’, Metro Magazine: Media & Education Magazine, No. 163, pp. 62-66.

Arthurson, K., Darcy, M. and D Rogers (2014) ‘Televised Territorial Stigma’ Environment and Planning A 46, pp.1334 – 1350.

Threadgold, S. (2015) ‘Struggle Street is poverty porn with an extra dose of class racism’, Australian Options, Autumn 2015, pp.34-35. 

Week Six:              

Lambert, A. (2011) 'Modern' cinematic encounters: border crossing and environmental transformation in some recent Australian films’, Studies in Australasian Cinema, 5:2, pp. 185-192.

Khoo, O. (2014) ‘Missing water: imagination and empathy in Asian Australian ‘’boat stories’’ on screen’ Continuum, 28:5, pp. 605-615.

 

Week Seven:        

Hatol, M. (1993) ‘In Quest of Self-Identity: Gallipoli, Mateship, and the Construction of Australian National Identity’, Journal of Popular Film and Television, 21:1, pp.27-36.

Week Eight:           

Mules, W. (2009) 'In search of the new man: masculinity in recent Australian film and television', A Reader in Australian Popular Culture, New Delhi: SSS Publications, pp. 202-216.

Wolfe, M. J. (2016) ‘Puberty Blues—then and now: diffracting semblances of being girl in Australia, Feminist Media Studies (online), pp. 1-15. DOI: 10.1080/14680777.2016.1235598

Week Nine:            

King, Andrew S. (2009) ‘Romance and Reconciliation : The secret life of indigenous sexuality on Australian television drama’, Journal of Australian Studies, 33:1, pp. 37-50.

McKinnon, S. (2012) 'The Emerald City of Oz: The city of Sydney as a gay space in Australian feature films', Studies in Australasian Cinema, Volume 5: 3, pp. 307-319.

Week Ten:              

Horsfield, P. (2006) 'Down the tube: religion on Australian commercial television', Media International Australia Incorporating Culture and Policy 121, pp. 136-148.

Malone, P. (2012) ‘Christ Figures in Cinema, in Religion, in Theology’, Compass Theology Review, 46:3, pp.19-26.

Week Eleven:         

Rofe, M. W. (2012) 'Considering the Limits of Rural Place Making Opportunities: Rural Dystopias and Dark Tourism', Landscape Research 2012, pp. 1-11.

Turnbull, S. (2010) ‘Crime as Entertainment: The Case of TV Crime Drama’, Continuum, 24:6, 819-827.

Bodey, M. (2009) 'We love a bit of crime and grime: it's entertainment', The Australian,November 19, Available: http://www.theaustralian.com.au/media/we-love-a-bit-of-crime- and-grime-its-entertainment/story-e6frg996-1225797973815 <Accessed 26/1/13>

Week Twelve:   

Lambert, A. (2008) ‘Mediating crime, mediating culture: Nationality, femininity, corporeality and territory in the Schapelle Corby drugs case’, Crime, Media, Culture 4, pp. 237–255.

Andrejevic, M. (2011) ‘Securitainment’ in the post-9/11 era, Continuum 25:02, pp. 165-175.

Week 13: No set readings

The readings are available via the 'Unit Readings' link on the library site, or by searching the catalogue for each title and signing into the library site to connect to journals online. Contact your tutor ASAP with any problems.

Recommended further reading includes:

Arrow, M, Baker J and C Monagle (eds) (2016) Small Screens: Essays on Contemporary Australian Television, Clayton, Victoria: Monash University Publishing. 

Bennet, T. and David Carter (eds.) (2001) Culture in Australia: Policies, Publics and Programs, Cambridge: CUP.

Collins, F. and Therese Davies (2004) Australian Cinema After Mabo, Cambridge; Port Melbourne: CUP.

Frow, J. and Meaghan Morris (eds.) (1993) Australian Cultural Studies: A Reader, Chicago: University of Illinois Press.

Goldsmith B., Leeland G. and M. Ryan (eds) (2013) Intellect Directory of World Cinema: Australia and New Zealand Cinema, Bristol:Intellect Books.

Goldsmith B., Leeland G. and M. Ryan (eds) (2015) Intellect Directory of World Cinema: Australia and New Zealand Cinema 2, Bristol:Intellect Books.

Hage, G. (1998) White Nation: Fantasies of White Supremacy in Multicultural Australia, Sydney: Pluto Press.

Hodge, B and John O'Carroll (2006) Borderwork in Multicultural Australia, Crows Nest, N.S.W: Allen & Unwin.

Jupp, J. and John Nieuwenhuysen with Emma Dawson (2007) Social Cohesion in Australia, New York: CUP.

McKee, Alan. (2001) Australian television: a genealogy of great moments, South Melbourne, Vic: Oxford University Press.

McLean, I. (1999) White Aborigines: Identity Politics in Australian Art, New York: CUP.

Moran, A. (2005) Australia: Nation, Belonging and Globalistaion, London: Routledge.

Moran, Albert & Vieth, Errol. (2006). Film in Australia: an introduction. Port Melbourne, Vic: Cambridge University Press.

Nelmes, J (Ed) (2007) Introduction to film studies, Abingdon, [England]; New York: Routledge,

O'Regan, T. (1996) Australian National Cinema, London; New York: Routledge.

Prerera, S. (2009) Australia and the Insular Imagination, New York: Palgrave.

Rayner, J. (2000) Contemporary Australian Cinema: An Introduction, Manchester : Manchester University Press.

Sawal, A and R. Sawal (eds) (2009) Creative Nation: Australian Cinema and Cultural Studies Reader, New Delhi: SSS Publications.

Simpson, C., Murawska, R. and A. Lambert (eds) (2009) Diasporas of Australian Cinema Bristol: Intellect.

Turner, G. (1986) National Fictions: Literature, Film and the Construction of Australian Narrative , 2nd Edn, St Leonards: Allen & Unwin.

Turner, G. (1993) Nation, Culture Text: Australian Cultural and Media Studies, London; New York: Routledge.

Turner, Graeme & Cunningham, Stuart. Eds. (2000) The Australian TV book. St Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin.

Verhoeven, Deb. (Ed) (1999) Twin Peeks : Australian and New Zealand Feature Films, Melbourne : Damned,

 

 

 

 

Useful Journals:

Australian Humanities Review

Journal of Australian Studies

Journal of Australian Popular Culture

Media International Australia

Metro Magazine

​Screening the Past

Studies in Australasian Cinema

Unit Schedule

 UNIT LEARNING AND TEACHING SCHEDULE - AS PER THE iLearn WEEKLY ACTIVITIES

  • Week One:          Australianness  
  • Week Two:           National Identity
  • Week Three:        Indigeneity
  • Week Four:          Multiculturalism
  • Week Five:           Spaces
  • Week Six:             Migration and Detention
  • Week Seven:        Anzac (Screenings only)
  • RECESS:             17 April - 28 April (No classes)
  • Week Eight:          Gender
  • Week Nine:           Sex and Sexuality
  • Week Ten:             Religion and Spirituality
  • Week Eleven        Badlands and Criminality
  • Week Twelve:       Asian Drug Stories
  • Week 13:              Consultations 

 

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Additional information

MMCCS website https://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/faculties_and_departments/faculty_of_arts/department_of_media_music_communication_and_cultural_studies/

MMCCS Session Re-mark Application http://www.mq.edu.au/pubstatic/public/download/?id=167914

Information is correct at the time of publication

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop scholarly and thematic familiarity (contemporary and historical) of Cultural Studies with respect to Australian film and television.
  • Analyse Australian screen texts and associated cultural practices (Australian spaces, media, scholarly work, social and historical phenomena).
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the politicised aspects of Australian life: how definitions of Australian culture and identity work with respect to on-screen representation, texts, technologies, industries and lived realities.
  • Identify the production of 'Australianness' through discourses of nationalism and social inclusion.

Assessment tasks

  • Surveys
  • Presentation
  • Quarterly Tests

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop scholarly and thematic familiarity (contemporary and historical) of Cultural Studies with respect to Australian film and television.
  • Analyse Australian screen texts and associated cultural practices (Australian spaces, media, scholarly work, social and historical phenomena).
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the politicised aspects of Australian life: how definitions of Australian culture and identity work with respect to on-screen representation, texts, technologies, industries and lived realities.
  • Identify the production of 'Australianness' through discourses of nationalism and social inclusion.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form.

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation
  • Journal
  • Quarterly Tests

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyse Australian screen texts and associated cultural practices (Australian spaces, media, scholarly work, social and historical phenomena).
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the politicised aspects of Australian life: how definitions of Australian culture and identity work with respect to on-screen representation, texts, technologies, industries and lived realities.
  • Identify the production of 'Australianness' through discourses of nationalism and social inclusion.
  • Review critically, analyse and synthesise findings in written and creative form, as well as faciliate and participate in discussions and presentations.

Assessment tasks

  • Surveys
  • Quarterly Tests

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Review critically, analyse and synthesise findings in written and creative form, as well as faciliate and participate in discussions and presentations.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form.

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation
  • Journal
  • Quarterly Tests

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyse Australian screen texts and associated cultural practices (Australian spaces, media, scholarly work, social and historical phenomena).
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the politicised aspects of Australian life: how definitions of Australian culture and identity work with respect to on-screen representation, texts, technologies, industries and lived realities.
  • Review critically, analyse and synthesise findings in written and creative form, as well as faciliate and participate in discussions and presentations.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form.

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation
  • Journal
  • Quarterly Tests

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify the production of 'Australianness' through discourses of nationalism and social inclusion.
  • Identify issues specific to Cultural Studies practice, including ethical relations to others, social justice and equity, and the appreciation of diversity.

Assessment tasks

  • Surveys
  • Journal

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the politicised aspects of Australian life: how definitions of Australian culture and identity work with respect to on-screen representation, texts, technologies, industries and lived realities.
  • Review critically, analyse and synthesise findings in written and creative form, as well as faciliate and participate in discussions and presentations.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form.
  • Identify issues specific to Cultural Studies practice, including ethical relations to others, social justice and equity, and the appreciation of diversity.

Assessment task

  • Surveys

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop scholarly and thematic familiarity (contemporary and historical) of Cultural Studies with respect to Australian film and television.
  • Analyse Australian screen texts and associated cultural practices (Australian spaces, media, scholarly work, social and historical phenomena).
  • Identify the production of 'Australianness' through discourses of nationalism and social inclusion.
  • Review critically, analyse and synthesise findings in written and creative form, as well as faciliate and participate in discussions and presentations.
  • Identify issues specific to Cultural Studies practice, including ethical relations to others, social justice and equity, and the appreciation of diversity.

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation
  • Journal
  • Quarterly Tests

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Analyse Australian screen texts and associated cultural practices (Australian spaces, media, scholarly work, social and historical phenomena).
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the politicised aspects of Australian life: how definitions of Australian culture and identity work with respect to on-screen representation, texts, technologies, industries and lived realities.
  • Review critically, analyse and synthesise findings in written and creative form, as well as faciliate and participate in discussions and presentations.
  • Communicate in a manner conforming to accepted academic standards in both written and spoken form.
  • Identify issues specific to Cultural Studies practice, including ethical relations to others, social justice and equity, and the appreciation of diversity.

Assessment tasks

  • Surveys
  • Presentation