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PSY 235 – Developmental Psychology

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Cathy McMahon
Contact via cathy.mcmahon@mq.edu.au
C3A Room 715
Tuesday 12-2pm, Wednesday 9-10am
Senior Tutor/Administration
Alexandra Lonergan
Contact via alexandra.lonergan@mq.edu.au
Administrator Student Office
Novello Alday
Tutor
Anna-Lisa Camberis
Tutor
Andy Hall
Tutor
Nasreen Yasin
Tutor
Daniell Steinberg
Tutor
Christine Leonards
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
[(PSY104(P) and PSY105(P)) and (STAT122 or STAT170(P) or STAT171 or PSY122(P))] or [admission to GDipPsych] or [((PSY104(P) and PSY122(P)) or PSYC104)) and (admission to BA-PsychLLB or GCertSphComm or GDipSphComm or DipSphComm)] or [(PSYC104 and PSYC105] or [PSY104(P) and PSYC105 and STAT170(P)] or [PSYC104 and PSY105(P) and STAT170(P)]
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit involves the study of how humans grow and change across the life span from conception until death. The unit consolidates and extends topics introduced in the developmental section of PSYC105. We explore developmental continuities and changes that are normative and common to most people, but also ways in which people differ from one another. In particular we focus on theories that seek to explain development and the extent to which development is influenced by genes, the physical environment, social relationships, and the context in which the individual lives. We survey major theories, research findings, and contemporary issues in physical, cognitive, social-emotional, and personality development across the life span. The tutorial sessions complement the lectures and focus on developmental research methodologies and practical applications of developmental theory.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Knowledge: Recall, recognise and describe key concepts of the major developmental theories. (Lectures, Textbook)
  2. Understanding: Describe the processes of development from conception through pregnancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood (Lectures, Textbook)
  3. Application: Apply developmental theories to various real-life scenarios to explain or predict observed human behaviour at different stages across the lifespan. (Lectures, Tutorials, Literature Review)
  4. Research Skills and Critical Analysis: Collect, integrate and critically evaluate a body of developmental research literature on a specified developmental topic.
  5. Academic writing: Clearly present a line of argument using a concise and clear academic writing style (APA Publication Manual, journal articles)

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Quiz 10% Week starting 11/9/17
Literature Review 40% 5.00pm Monday 18/9/17
Final Examination 50% Final Examination Period

Quiz

Due: Week starting 11/9/17
Weighting: 10%

This quiz is "open book" and is a low-risk introductory assessment task to ensure you engage with lecture and tutorial material during the early weeks. You will receive feedback on your performance. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Knowledge: Recall, recognise and describe key concepts of the major developmental theories. (Lectures, Textbook)

Literature Review

Due: 5.00pm Monday 18/9/17
Weighting: 40%

This assessment task assesses research, integration, critical analysis and academic writing skills. You will receive a detailed handout regarding this assessment task and guidance in lectures and tutorials about how to approach it.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding: Describe the processes of development from conception through pregnancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood (Lectures, Textbook)
  • Application: Apply developmental theories to various real-life scenarios to explain or predict observed human behaviour at different stages across the lifespan. (Lectures, Tutorials, Literature Review)
  • Research Skills and Critical Analysis: Collect, integrate and critically evaluate a body of developmental research literature on a specified developmental topic.
  • Academic writing: Clearly present a line of argument using a concise and clear academic writing style (APA Publication Manual, journal articles)

Final Examination

Due: Final Examination Period
Weighting: 50%

This test assesses knowledge, understanding and application of unit content including tutorial content.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Knowledge: Recall, recognise and describe key concepts of the major developmental theories. (Lectures, Textbook)
  • Application: Apply developmental theories to various real-life scenarios to explain or predict observed human behaviour at different stages across the lifespan. (Lectures, Tutorials, Literature Review)

Delivery and Resources

The unit is comprised of lectures and tutorials. 

Lectures: 1 x 2-hour lecture each week on Wednesday 10 am - 12 midday in X5BT1. Lectures are live streamed. 

Lecture recordings are available through echo on ilearn.

Tutorials: 1 x 2-hour tutorial each fortnight. There are five tutorial topics. There are some weeks with no tutorials. 

Students are strongly advised to attend the tutorials once per fortnight. Students are divided into A and B Streams. The A Stream will begin tutorials in the second week of session 2 (starts Monday 7th August),   and the B Stream will begin in the third week (starting Monday 14th August). There are no tutorials in the weeks starting Monday 4rd October (Labor Day Public Holiday), and Monday 11th October.

The timetable for classes can be found on the University web site here   

Tutorial Attendance: There are no marks allocated for tutorial attendance, but attendance is strongly encouraged as the format is interactive, material covered in class discussions is included in quizzes and examinations, and the classes and content are not recorded. At many of the tutorials we will use videotaped stimulus material to discuss theoretical and methodological issues. The emphasis is on active engagement with this material.

Prescribed text: The textbook has been custom designed by Associate Professor Catherine McMahon for this course and includes material from two Australian textbooks as well as excerpts from a chapter in a North American textbook. All three source texts are published by Pearson Custom Publishing.

PSY 235 Developmental Psychology 3rd Edition: A Macquarie Custom Book is available in the bookshop. See the Unit Schedule for full details of relevant sections. 

Authors of content in the custom book    

White, F., Hayes, B., Livesey, D. (2013). Developmental Psychology from Infancy to Adulthood. (3rd edition). Sydney: Pearson Australia.

Peterson, C. (2010). Looking Forward through the Lifespan (5th ed.). Sydney: Pearson Australia.

 

 

Unit Schedule

(Note: Page numbers for readings are at top of page in text book)

MODULE 1 INTRODUCTION AND EARLY DEVELOPMENT 

Introduction, Overview of Theory, Approach to writing a literature review: McMahon Textbook 1-37.

2 Aug

No Tutorial

Prenatal Development, Genes, Environment: McMahon 

Textbook 37-71.

9 Aug

Tutorial 1A

Physical and Perceptual Development: McMahon 

Textbook 74-95;  100-129.

16 Aug

Tutorial 1B

MODULE 2 COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT 

Cognitive Development A: Warburton

Textbook 174-209.

Cognitive Development B: McMahon

Textbook 134-170.

23 Aug

Tutorial 2A

 

30 Aug

Tutorial 2B

 

 

MODULE 3 SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT A

Temperament and Q&A Session: McMahon

Textbook 214-226.

Opportunity to ask questions about your Literature Review

6 Sept

Tutorial 3A

 Social-Emotional Development and Attachment: McMahon

Textbook 226-240.

13 Sept

Tutorial 3B

MID-SESSION BREAK:   Literature Reviews are due Monday  18th September at 5.00pm

 

 MODULE 4 SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT B

Contexts for Development: Families & Parenting: McMahon  

Textbook 244-255. 

5  Oct

No tutorial

Gender Development: Bussey 

Textbook 259-270. 

Moral Development: Bussey ​

Textbook 276-305.

11 Oct

No tutes

18 Oct

Tutorial 4A

MODULE 5 ADULT DEVELOPMENT AND AGEING 

Adolescence/Adult Development: Warburton/Ferguson

Extracts from Berk, L.E. Textbook 309-319.

Adult Development Continued: Ferguson

Extracts from Berk, L.E. Textbook 324-345.

Death and Dying: Ferguson

Textbook 349-375. 

 

25 Oct

Tutorial 4B

1 Nov

Tutorial 5A

8 Nov

Tutorial 5B

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Academic Honesty: 

Students are responsible for ensuring academic integrity practices are followed at all times. Your first step is to read the University's Academic Honesty Policy, and make sure you know what constitutes good practice and what plagiarism is, see link above.

Plagiarism is an example of dishonest academic behaviour and is defined by the Policy on Academic honesty as: “Using the work or ideas of another person and presenting this as your own without clear acknowledgement of the source of the work or ideas”. There are two main issues. The first is presenting text from a publication or material retrieved from a website as though it were your own.  When doing a literature review that involves presenting an analysis of the work of a number of theorists and researchers you need to make sure you know how to reference and cite correctly.

The other practice is the potential for collusion with other students. Informal study groups are encouraged as a good way to assist your learning, but please remember that all your independently assessed assignments must be totally independently completed. Unless you are doing a group project where each member contributes to producing one piece of work, for which you get the one mark, using part or all of someone else's work constitutes collusion and breaches the University's Academic Honesty policy.

Do not collude with any other student by selling, giving, lending, explaining or showing all or parts of your independently assessed work/answers/past or current assignments, and do not ask to buy, borrow, see and use all or parts of the work of another student. Plagiarism is a serious breach of the University's rules and carries significant penalties.  The Schedule of Penalties can be found at: http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/schedule_penalties.html

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Knowledge: Recall, recognise and describe key concepts of the major developmental theories. (Lectures, Textbook)
  • Understanding: Describe the processes of development from conception through pregnancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood (Lectures, Textbook)
  • Application: Apply developmental theories to various real-life scenarios to explain or predict observed human behaviour at different stages across the lifespan. (Lectures, Tutorials, Literature Review)

Assessment tasks

  • Quiz
  • Final Examination

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understanding: Describe the processes of development from conception through pregnancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood (Lectures, Textbook)
  • Application: Apply developmental theories to various real-life scenarios to explain or predict observed human behaviour at different stages across the lifespan. (Lectures, Tutorials, Literature Review)
  • Research Skills and Critical Analysis: Collect, integrate and critically evaluate a body of developmental research literature on a specified developmental topic.
  • Academic writing: Clearly present a line of argument using a concise and clear academic writing style (APA Publication Manual, journal articles)

Assessment tasks

  • Literature Review
  • Final Examination

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Application: Apply developmental theories to various real-life scenarios to explain or predict observed human behaviour at different stages across the lifespan. (Lectures, Tutorials, Literature Review)
  • Research Skills and Critical Analysis: Collect, integrate and critically evaluate a body of developmental research literature on a specified developmental topic.

Assessment task

  • Literature Review

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Application: Apply developmental theories to various real-life scenarios to explain or predict observed human behaviour at different stages across the lifespan. (Lectures, Tutorials, Literature Review)

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understanding: Describe the processes of development from conception through pregnancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood (Lectures, Textbook)
  • Research Skills and Critical Analysis: Collect, integrate and critically evaluate a body of developmental research literature on a specified developmental topic.
  • Academic writing: Clearly present a line of argument using a concise and clear academic writing style (APA Publication Manual, journal articles)

Assessment task

  • Literature Review

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Application: Apply developmental theories to various real-life scenarios to explain or predict observed human behaviour at different stages across the lifespan. (Lectures, Tutorials, Literature Review)

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Application: Apply developmental theories to various real-life scenarios to explain or predict observed human behaviour at different stages across the lifespan. (Lectures, Tutorials, Literature Review)
  • Research Skills and Critical Analysis: Collect, integrate and critically evaluate a body of developmental research literature on a specified developmental topic.
  • Academic writing: Clearly present a line of argument using a concise and clear academic writing style (APA Publication Manual, journal articles)

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Academic writing: Clearly present a line of argument using a concise and clear academic writing style (APA Publication Manual, journal articles)