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ICOM101 – Intercultural Relations

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Sabine Krajewski
Contact via sabine.krajewski@mq.edu.au
Y3A 165H
Wed after 1pm, please confirm your appointment via email.
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit introduces a theoretical framework for the analysis of intercultural communication. Some of the concepts introduced in ICOM100, such as power and discourse will be revisited and reapplied. Students will be introduced to Marshall McLuhan's notion of the global village and look at the importance of intercultural communication as part of the latest phase of globalisation. Lectures and tutorials are dedicated to the cultural, economic and political implications of intercultural communication and will address intercultural communication across university settings, in the workplace, and in the media. In this unit we expand our knowledge of international media flows and explore media image management. Approaches on how to increase social tolerance and understanding are assessed in the context of how intercultural communication may be used as a tool in conflict situations.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate basic knowledge of intercultural communication theory; key issues and concepts: culture, global village, power, interpersonal and intergroup communication, conflict and conflict management
  2. Define cultural identity and develop empathy
  3. Extend communication skills relevant to cross-cultural conflict
  4. Identify creative ways to manage intercultural (work) situations
  5. Assess political and social developments in the context of globalization and intercultural relations

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
active engagement 25% week 4
Identity Sheet 10% week 7
Essay 45% Week 11
Mini Essay 20% week 9

active engagement

Due: week 4
Weighting: 25%

 

To be successful in this unit, you need to actively participate in lectures and tutorials.  Marks will be awarded for active participation rather than physical presence. There will be 2 in class assessments, one in weeks 3 and 4, the other in weeks 6 and 7. In week 3, you will be divided into 3 groups. Each student of each group will individually research  an aspect of the history of globalization as outlined on p. 51 in your coursebook. In week 4, each group gets together and compares notes on the events, time periods, etc, then each group draws a timeline and presents their results to the other groups. Your individual findings need to be uploaded to ilearn before class, the group summary after class. 

 

Marking Criteria for the history of globalisation task

Fail

 

Pass

 

Credit

 

Distinction

 

High Distinction

Not attempted, information not relevant,

unable to contribute to group work

 

Some relevant info from reliable sources

some input to group assignment

participation in discussion

 

Thorough approach, appropriate info from a variety of sources

leadership in discussion and group work

 

Excellent approach, relevant information well reflected, leadership in discussion and group work

 

Comprehensive results, good presentation of findings, leadership in discussion and group work, ability to include other students ideas

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate basic knowledge of intercultural communication theory; key issues and concepts: culture, global village, power, interpersonal and intergroup communication, conflict and conflict management
  • Define cultural identity and develop empathy
  • Extend communication skills relevant to cross-cultural conflict
  • Identify creative ways to manage intercultural (work) situations
  • Assess political and social developments in the context of globalization and intercultural relations

Identity Sheet

Due: week 7
Weighting: 10%

 

Prepare a short account about your identities. Use chapter 4 to inform yourself about avowed and ascribed identities and think about how much your own identity depends on where you are, where you grew up, your age, gender, ethnicity, etc. Your identity page needs to be brief, one page ( around 300w) must suffice. Upload your identity sheet (use link on ilearn) before coming to class in week 7. In week 7, share your identity page with your group. You will be instructed how to peer review each other's work.

 

 

Marking Criteria identity sheet                                 ICOM 101

 

 

 

HD

D

Cr

P

F

 

 

identity concept

Clear definition of identities and how they interact with each other

use of relevant examples

A good understanding of identity and different facets of identity

Use of different sources/materials to introduce topic

A good understanding of identity and different facets of identity

Some understanding of identity

Not well connected to topic of the week

 

 

use of terminology

thorough understanding of different types of identity and how it is communicated

good understanding of different types of identity and how it is communicated

some understanding of different types of identity

outlines different types of identity

Read from script, not well coordinated between partners, difficult to follow

 

 

explanation of connection between identity, culture and place

well referenced demonstration of knowledge about how culture, identity and place are connected

good demonstration of knowledge about how culture, identity and place are connected

some understanding of the connection between culture, identity and place.

Some effort to explain connection between culture, identity and place.

No mention of connections between identity, place and culture

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate basic knowledge of intercultural communication theory; key issues and concepts: culture, global village, power, interpersonal and intergroup communication, conflict and conflict management
  • Define cultural identity and develop empathy
  • Extend communication skills relevant to cross-cultural conflict
  • Identify creative ways to manage intercultural (work) situations

Essay

Due: Week 11
Weighting: 45%

 

Choose a question that interests you (see list online) and write a critical essay of 1,500-2,000words. Your essay needs to be referenced and have in-text citations. Topics will be available by mid semester. To upload your essay, please use the turnitin link on ilearn.

 

Marking Criteria Essay 101: 1,500 - 2,000words

 

HD

 

D

Credit

Pass

Fail

Structure

and style

 

Clearly distinguished but well connected intro, body and conclusion; paragraphs for each new topic/thought,

Conclusion clearly refers to author’s argument and rounds up the essay

 

Clear intro, body and conclusion; paragraphs for each new topic/thought,

Conclusion clearly refers to author’s argument

Recognisable introduction, body and conclusion,

Conclusion confirms author’s view

Recognisable introduction, body and conclusion though inappropriate length of either part, conclusion does not go beyond summary

No clear structure, no recognisable structure of thought or argument

referencing

Consistent and correct referencing; complete reference list; uses well chosen sources beyond reader, well balanced (books/journals, internet) appropriate amount

 

Consistent referencing; complete reference list; uses sources beyond reader, well balanced (books/journals, internet) appropriate amount

Consistent referencing; complete reference list uses sources beyond reader

Inconsistencies in referencing or incomplete ref. list, most sources from internet or reader

Inappropriate or no referencing, badly composed or no reference list

Argument

Distinct argument well supported by theoretical framework and relevant scholars

 

Clear argument well supported by theoretical framework and relevant scholars

Clear argument but not well supported

or

Many relevant scholars discussed but no own argument

Some argument but inconsistent, scholars/theories referred to but not always conclusive or relevant

Merely a summary of what others have said

Or

Own argument but unsupported

relevance

Competently answers the essay question, introduces vital background info, uses up to date and relevant examples

 

Fully answers the essay question, introduces valid background info, relevant examples

Answers essay q but does not include much background information or examples

Answers essay question to large extend,

No relevant examples or background info

Does not address essay question

 

 

 

Late Submissions

Tasks 10% or less. No extensions will be granted. Students who have not submitted the task prior to the deadline will be awarded a mark of 0 for the task, except for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

 

Tasks above 10%. Students who submit late work without an extension will receive a penalty of 5% per day. This penalty does not apply for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

 

 

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate basic knowledge of intercultural communication theory; key issues and concepts: culture, global village, power, interpersonal and intergroup communication, conflict and conflict management
  • Define cultural identity and develop empathy
  • Assess political and social developments in the context of globalization and intercultural relations

Mini Essay

Due: week 9
Weighting: 20%

You will be discussing chapter 6 in class in week 8. Afterwards, choose one of the discussion questions at the end of chapter 6, p.149 in your book: question 3,4, or 5. Write a mini essay of about 500 words on one of the questions, include in-text citations and attach a short reference list (1-3 sources). Upload your work to Turnitin on ilearn before class in week 9.

The marking criteria are the same as for your longer, final essay, see above.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Extend communication skills relevant to cross-cultural conflict
  • Assess political and social developments in the context of globalization and intercultural relations

Delivery and Resources

Lecture: Tues 2-3 (1hour)  T5

Tutorials: see student timetable

Resources: ilearn

Textbook: Sorrells, Kathryn 2016. Intercultural Communication. Globalization and Social Justice. 2nd edition, Sage.

Unit Schedule

 

Week 1

Introduction: Lecture

Globalisation has drawn people together in complex systems, created competition for resources as well as offered amazing opportunities to traverse the world.

Does an assessment of Intercultural relations help make sense of global interconnectedness? How do we negotiate the complexities of cross cultural contact?

No tutorials in week one

Week 2

The theoretical field of intercultural relations began as an attempt to ensure contact was positive and constructive. How much does culture influence the way we see the world?

Reading: Chapter 1, Definitions of Culture

Tutorial: Intercultural Praxis in the Context of Globalization

be prepared to explain some of the key terms listed on p. 24!

 

Week 3 Rethinking the concept of globalisation: what does globalisation mean for individuals and nation states?

Lecture: As McLuhan explicates in his notion of the global village, there is a trend for the homogenisation of lifestyles, cities, goods and even the arts across the world. Yet billions of people continue to lead traditional lives in villages and isolated communities. Working with these people requires a real ability to negotiate deep cultural challenges.

Reading: chapter 2: Understanding the Context of Globalization

Tutorial: Intercultural Dimensions of Economic, Political and Cultural Globalization

In preparation of week 4, students will be divided into 3 groups. Each group is assigned to research the history of globalization as outlined in your book, p. 51.

Week 4

 

Tutorial: The history of globalization. Each group gets together and compares notes on the events, time periods, etc. they have found in their research. Together, each group will draw a timeline. Each group presents and all three projects will be compared and discussed. This will be one of your in class assessments.

Reading: chapter 2

 

Week 5

Gender, race, class.

Lecture: physical bodies play a major role in shaping public spheres and therefore cross cultural relations. Race as a social construct functions to keep power relations in place, social class as a category seems to have been replaced by notions of equal opportunity and classless societies and gender seems to be much less important in workplaces than it used to be - or is it?

Tutorial: Have a look at the discussion questions on page 74 before coming to class.

Reading: Chapter 3, in particular from page 56 to page 70. 

 

Week 6

How do the media influence our perceptions of race and ethnicity and how do perceptions of race/ethnicity shape the way we communicate across cultures?

Reading: chapter 3

In preparation for week 7, write a very short account (about 1 page) about your identities. Think about avowed and ascribed identity, and how your personal identity depends on where you are, where you grew up, your age, gender, ethnicity...

Week 7

Identity and cultural space.

Lecture: Are cultures still grounded in geographic location? What are the implications of changed communication modes, glocalization forces and cultural identities?

Tutorial: Share your thoughts about your identities, discuss avowed and ascribed identity and the notion of 'home'. Use chapter 4 to elaborate. Hand in your identity page to your tutor, it will be your second in class assessment.

Reading: chapter 4

 

 

Week 8

Lecture: Travel and living in new conditions typically leave people feeling disoriented and uncertain as familiar conditions are challenged by new ways of doing things. Culture shock is the classic sign of intercultural stress – but is cultural transition a negative experience?

Tutorial: Cultural transition and intercultural learning

Reading: Chapter 6, Crossing Borders

With your guided discussion during the tutorial in mind, write a mini essay on one of the following discussion questions at the end of ch6, page 149: question 3, question 4, or question 5. Your mini essay should be around 500words and have in-text citations as well as a short reference list (2 or 3 sources). This is your last in class assessment. Upload before next class in week 9.

 

Week 9

Lecture: Is there a clash of civilizations as Huntington predicted? We will explore the role of religion in different parts of the world and identify how  intercultural relations are affected by religious beliefs.

Tutorial: To understand the role of religion in so-called secular societies, it is useful to look at how law and politics are intertwined with religion.( ch 9, pages 210-214)

Reading: chapter 9

 

Week 10

Power imbalance and conflict

Tutorial: Identify the sources of conflict and different ways of analysis and solution styles. How useful is the framework of analysis for intercultural conflict Sorrells offers? (p.217)

Reading: chapter 9, Negotiating intercultural conflict and social justice

Week 11

Lecture: Global citizenship: rights and responsibilities

Tutorial: What does citizenship actually mean? What is social justice?

Reading: chapter 10, Engaging Intercultural Communication for Social Justice

 

Critical essay due this week!

Week 12

Tutorial: Empowerment for Change

Reading: chapter 10, analyse empowerment case studies

 

 

Week 13

No lecture.

Tutorial time will be used for wrap up and individual feedback

 

 

 

REQUIRED READING

Textbook: Sorrells, Kathryn 2016. Intercultural Communication. Globalization and Social Justice. 2nd edition, Sage.  

 

RECOMMENDED READING

Brislin, R., 2000. Understanding Culture's Influence on Behaviour. (2nd edition) Harcourt Brace, Fort Worth.

Jackson, Jane, 2014. Introducing Language and Intercultural Communication. Routledge, London, New York.

Martin, J. N. & T.K. Nakayama, 2012. Intercultural Communication in Contexts, (6th edition). McGaw Hill, London, NY.

Samovar, L, R. E. Porter and E. R. McDaniel, 2011. Intercultural Communication - A reader. (13th edition) Boston: Wadsworth

Weaver, G., 2000 (ed.). Culture, Communication and Conflict

(2nd edition). Pearson Publishing, Boston.

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Additional information

MMCCS website https://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/faculties_and_departments/faculty_of_arts/department_of_media_music_communication_and_cultural_studies/

MMCCS Session Re-mark Application http://www.mq.edu.au/pubstatic/public/download/?id=167914

Information is correct at the time of publication

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate basic knowledge of intercultural communication theory; key issues and concepts: culture, global village, power, interpersonal and intergroup communication, conflict and conflict management
  • Define cultural identity and develop empathy
  • Extend communication skills relevant to cross-cultural conflict
  • Identify creative ways to manage intercultural (work) situations
  • Assess political and social developments in the context of globalization and intercultural relations

Assessment tasks

  • active engagement
  • Identity Sheet
  • Essay
  • Mini Essay

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate basic knowledge of intercultural communication theory; key issues and concepts: culture, global village, power, interpersonal and intergroup communication, conflict and conflict management
  • Define cultural identity and develop empathy
  • Extend communication skills relevant to cross-cultural conflict
  • Identify creative ways to manage intercultural (work) situations
  • Assess political and social developments in the context of globalization and intercultural relations

Assessment tasks

  • active engagement
  • Identity Sheet
  • Essay
  • Mini Essay

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Extend communication skills relevant to cross-cultural conflict
  • Identify creative ways to manage intercultural (work) situations

Assessment tasks

  • active engagement
  • Essay
  • Mini Essay

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Extend communication skills relevant to cross-cultural conflict
  • Identify creative ways to manage intercultural (work) situations

Assessment tasks

  • active engagement
  • Identity Sheet
  • Essay

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate basic knowledge of intercultural communication theory; key issues and concepts: culture, global village, power, interpersonal and intergroup communication, conflict and conflict management
  • Define cultural identity and develop empathy
  • Extend communication skills relevant to cross-cultural conflict
  • Identify creative ways to manage intercultural (work) situations
  • Assess political and social developments in the context of globalization and intercultural relations

Assessment tasks

  • active engagement
  • Identity Sheet
  • Essay
  • Mini Essay

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Define cultural identity and develop empathy
  • Extend communication skills relevant to cross-cultural conflict
  • Assess political and social developments in the context of globalization and intercultural relations

Assessment tasks

  • Identity Sheet
  • Mini Essay

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Define cultural identity and develop empathy
  • Extend communication skills relevant to cross-cultural conflict
  • Identify creative ways to manage intercultural (work) situations
  • Assess political and social developments in the context of globalization and intercultural relations

Assessment task

  • Mini Essay

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Define cultural identity and develop empathy
  • Extend communication skills relevant to cross-cultural conflict
  • Identify creative ways to manage intercultural (work) situations

Assessment task

  • active engagement

Changes from Previous Offering

Unit outline has been modified, assessment tasks have been adjusted.