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CUL 321 – Racialised Punishment and the Construction of Nation

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Jillian Kramer
Contact via Email
Y3A 152 (02) 9850 2252
2-4pm on Mondays
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
39cp at 100 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
In this unit we examine a range of embodied subjects that stand in a relation of crisis and/or dissent in the context of dominant Australian culture. We focus specifically on how such apparatuses of racialised punishment as the camp, prison, reserve and detention centre have been constitutive in founding and shaping the Australian nation. We examine: Aboriginal sovereignty and the colonial camp; the cultural politics of terrorism and state violence; the power of whiteness; the racialisation of criminality and the prison industry; histories of political internment; and Australia's treatment of refugees and asylum seekers. These topics are examined through the lens of social justice and are situated in the context of film, documentaries and contemporary news media. The unit brings into focus the manner in which targeted communities have mobilised activist networks and a range of media in order to work toward social change and a more just society.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate critical skills, informed by cultural theories, that will enable students to understand the ways in which the categories of nation and national identity are inscribed with a series of normative values that function to construct othered subjects that are disenfranchised and/or excluded from the official corpus of nation.
  2. Develop the ability to synthesise and articulate the relations between knowledge and power in the context of nation.
  3. Deploy analytical skills that enable students critically to evaluate institutions of authority in order to disclose such things as institutional racism and other discriminatory practices.
  4. Develop ethical skills that will enable students to address issues of cultural difference and social justice concerns within the context of the Australian nation and its relation to global events and issues.
  5. Deploy critical argumentation skills that will enable students to support and materially evidence their particular viewpoints on contentious national issues.
  6. Employ cultural literacy skills that will enable students to address issues concerned with cultural difference in an informed manner.
  7. Develop socially active and responsible skills that will enable students to analyse and solve problems.

General Assessment Information

Late Submissions:

Tasks 10% or less: No extensions will be granted. Students who have not submitted the task prior to the decline will be awarded a mark of 0 for the task, except for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved. 

Tasks above 10%: No extensions will be granted. Students who submit late work without an extension ​will receive a penalty of 10% per day. This penalty does not apply for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Engagement & Participation 10% Ongoing
Critical Analysis 15% 11:59pm 19 March 2017
Policy Briefing Paper 25% 11:59pm 26 April 2017
Final Essay 50% 11:59pm 5 June 2017

Engagement & Participation

Due: Ongoing
Weighting: 10%

Over the course of this session, students are expected to actively engage and participate in weekly tutorial activities and class discussions. You will be assessed on your engagement in tutorial activities and, in line with the learning outcomes, your ability to develop ethical and informed means of contributing to debates on complex and often contentious issues of cultural difference and social justice. 

​Assessment Criteria:

Students will be assessed according to the following criteria: 

  1. Demonstrates preparation for tutorials, including engagement with the weekly lectures and required readings 
  2. Demonstrates active engagement with peers in the tutorial activities 
  3. Demonstrates cultural literacy skills in order to offer informed and ethical responses to activities 

If you cannot attend a tutorial due to an unavoidable and serious disruption, please email your unit convenor and submit a disruption to studies notification via ask.mq.edu.au. To learn more about how to apply for Disruption to Studies, please click here.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate critical skills, informed by cultural theories, that will enable students to understand the ways in which the categories of nation and national identity are inscribed with a series of normative values that function to construct othered subjects that are disenfranchised and/or excluded from the official corpus of nation.
  • Develop the ability to synthesise and articulate the relations between knowledge and power in the context of nation.
  • Deploy analytical skills that enable students critically to evaluate institutions of authority in order to disclose such things as institutional racism and other discriminatory practices.
  • Develop ethical skills that will enable students to address issues of cultural difference and social justice concerns within the context of the Australian nation and its relation to global events and issues.
  • Employ cultural literacy skills that will enable students to address issues concerned with cultural difference in an informed manner.
  • Develop socially active and responsible skills that will enable students to analyse and solve problems.

Critical Analysis

Due: 11:59pm 19 March 2017
Weighting: 15%

For this assessment, students are required to perform a 500-800 word critical analysis of one of the required readings from weeks one, two or three of this unit. In their analysis, students must outline the purpose of their chosen text and the contribution that it makes to scholarly research (such as the theoretical concepts, arguments or methodologies developed by the author). Most importantly, they should also include an informed and nuanced critique of their chosen text that identifies any inadequacies or gaps in the research and explores how the research could be extended and adapted for our contemporary context. 

 

Assessment Criteria:

Students will be assessed according to the following criteria:

  1. Demonstrates the ability to identify and outline the purpose of the selected text 
  2. Demonstrates engagement with relevant external scholarly research in order to identify and outline the contribution the selected text makes to the field
  3. Demonstrates an understanding of the theoretical concepts, arguments and/or methodologies explored in the selected text
  4. Draws on external research to perform an informed and nuanced critique of the chosen text that identifies potential gaps in the research and potential ways in which the research could be extended 
  5. Demonstrates the effective use of writing skills to present academic research, including consistent and accurate use of in-text referencing

Submission: Students will submit their Critical Analysis via the Turnitin link on the unit iLearn Site.

Late Penalty: A late penalty of 10% per day (including weekends) will be deducted for late submissions.

Disruption to Studies: Students who have experienced an unavoidable and serious disruption to their studies and are seeking an extension should contact the unit convenor and submit a Disruption to Studies application via ask.mq.edu.au. Extensions will only be granted in line with University Policy. To learn more about how to apply for Disruption to Studies, please click here


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Deploy analytical skills that enable students critically to evaluate institutions of authority in order to disclose such things as institutional racism and other discriminatory practices.
  • Deploy critical argumentation skills that will enable students to support and materially evidence their particular viewpoints on contentious national issues.
  • Develop socially active and responsible skills that will enable students to analyse and solve problems.

Policy Briefing Paper

Due: 11:59pm 26 April 2017
Weighting: 25%

For this assessment, students are required to write a policy briefing paper that could be submitted to either local, state or federal institutions or government bodies. In order to write this briefing paper, they must select one specific issue or case study that we have discussed so far in the unit. Then, students must prepare a scholarly policy paper that draws on theoretical concepts and cultural studies methodologies in order to critically analyse the issue at stake and offer productive recommendations.

For example, you may identify a specific issue such as the criminalisation of Indigenous people in the Northern Territory following the introduction of new legislation or the erasure of Indigenous counter-histories in our high school history syllabus. After identifying a topic, you must then use cultural studies concepts and methodologies, relevant external research and a case study or example in order to perform a well-informed analysis of the issue. In line with the unit's learning outcomes, you must also outline well-researched and ethical recommendations. We will further discuss the components of policy briefings and scholarly research in selected weekly tutorials.

Assessment Criteria: 

Students will be assessed according to the following assessment criteria:

  1. Demonstrates a clear and effective grasp of the relevant key concepts and methodologies explored in this unit  
  2. Demonstrates scholarly research into the issue under review, including engaging with relevant research papers, case studies and resources such as legislation, institutional policies and government procedures. 
  3. Draws on relevant concepts and research in order to provide a well-informed analysis of the issue under review 
  4. Deploys cultural literacy and analytical skills in order to put forward well-developed, ethical and responsible recommendations
  5. Demonstrates the effective use of writing skills to present the policy briefing paper, including consistent and accurate use of in-text referencing.

Submission: Students will submit their Briefing Paper via the Turnitin Link on the unit iLearn Site.

Late Penalty: A late penalty of 10% per day (including weekends) will be deducted for late submissions.

Disruption to Studies: Students who have experienced an unavoidable and serious disruption to their studies and are seeking an extension should contact the unit convenor and submit a Disruption to Studies application via ask.mq.edu.au. Extensions will only be granted in line with University Policy. To learn more about how to apply for Disruption to Studies, please click here

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate critical skills, informed by cultural theories, that will enable students to understand the ways in which the categories of nation and national identity are inscribed with a series of normative values that function to construct othered subjects that are disenfranchised and/or excluded from the official corpus of nation.
  • Deploy analytical skills that enable students critically to evaluate institutions of authority in order to disclose such things as institutional racism and other discriminatory practices.
  • Develop ethical skills that will enable students to address issues of cultural difference and social justice concerns within the context of the Australian nation and its relation to global events and issues.
  • Deploy critical argumentation skills that will enable students to support and materially evidence their particular viewpoints on contentious national issues.
  • Employ cultural literacy skills that will enable students to address issues concerned with cultural difference in an informed manner.
  • Develop socially active and responsible skills that will enable students to analyse and solve problems.

Final Essay

Due: 11:59pm 5 June 2017
Weighting: 50%

Students must write a 2,000 word essay in response to one of the questions listed below. In their answers, students must use the theoretical concepts discussed over the course of the semester in order to develop an well-informed argument that can be demonstrated via analysis of examples or a relevant case study. 

Questions:

  1. Discuss the issues of contested histories and space, colonial assimilation and the politics of Aboriginal identities in the context of Blackman’s Houses and Ian Anderson’s essay “Re-claiming Tru-ger-nan-ner.”
  2. Discuss the significance of what Irene Watson calls “proper law-full acknowledgements of the sovereignty of Aboriginal peoples.”
  3. Discuss the key attributes of "invisible whiteness” and ground your discussion in concrete historical and contemporary examples.
  4. Discuss the concepts of Aboriginal law, colonial law and terra nullius in the context of Dhakiyarr vs the King.
  5. Discuss the relation between colonial policing and racialised punishment in the context of contemporary Australian culture. 
  6. What are the key issues that emerge from the yoking of crime to ethnicity, and the consequent criminalisation of specific ethnic minorities?  Discuss in the context of Collins et al’s essay, Of Middle Eastern Appearance and/or contemporary of racial profiling, policing and crime.
  7. Discuss the importance of the camp, as a place of quarantine, internment and punishment of targeted groups, in the context of Australian history and national identity.
  8. How is suburban space also a place where cultural politics is played out?  Discuss in relation to ethnic architecture, backyards and their relation to issues of memory, identity and place.
  9. Discuss the significance of Aboriginal “life writing” and oral histories in the context of Auntie Rita and dominant colonial histories.
  10. Discuss the relationship between Indigenous sovereignty and white colonial possession in the context of Australia’s policies on refugees and asylum seekers.
  11. Stage an in-depth critique of the politics of fear and terror.
  12. Construct a question of your choice that focuses on a text and any of the issues raised in the course of this unit.  Please consult with your tutor if you wish to take up this option.

Assessment Criteria: 

Students will be assessed according to the following assessment criteria:

  1. Demonstrates a clear and effective grasp of the relevant key concepts, arguments and methodologies explored in this unit  
  2. Demonstrates scholarly and nuanced engagement with cultural studies research in order to address issues of power, cultural difference and social justice concerns
  3. Demonstrates critical argumentation skills by drawing on both academic research and their own forensic analysis of a chosen case study or examples in order to materially support and illustrate their argument 
  4. Effectively addresses the chosen question using relevant scholarly and external texts 
  5. Demonstrates the effective use of writing skills to present academic research, including consistent and accurate use of in-text referencing

Submission: Students will submit the Final Essay via the Turnitin Link on the unit iLearn Site.

Late Penalty: A late penalty of 10% per day (including weekends) will be deducted for late submissions.

Disruption to Studies: Students who have experienced an unavoidable and serious disruption to their studies and are seeking an extension should contact the unit convenor and submit a Disruption to Studies application via ask.mq.edu.au. Extensions will only be granted in line with University Policy. To learn more about how to apply for Disruption to Studies, please click here


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate critical skills, informed by cultural theories, that will enable students to understand the ways in which the categories of nation and national identity are inscribed with a series of normative values that function to construct othered subjects that are disenfranchised and/or excluded from the official corpus of nation.
  • Develop the ability to synthesise and articulate the relations between knowledge and power in the context of nation.
  • Deploy analytical skills that enable students critically to evaluate institutions of authority in order to disclose such things as institutional racism and other discriminatory practices.
  • Deploy critical argumentation skills that will enable students to support and materially evidence their particular viewpoints on contentious national issues.
  • Employ cultural literacy skills that will enable students to address issues concerned with cultural difference in an informed manner.
  • Develop socially active and responsible skills that will enable students to analyse and solve problems.

Delivery and Resources

Attendance:

You are required to attend all tutorials. As participation in the process of learning is linked to, and underpins the unit Learning Outcomes, you will need to either apply for Disruptions to Studies to cover any missed tutorial (if the disruption is greater than three consecutive days) or supply appropriate documentation to your unit convenor for any missed tutorial (if less than three consecutive days).

Unit Delivery:

Lectures and Tutorials will begin in the first week of the semester.

This unit will be taught through a combination of lectures and tutorials.  Echo recordings of the lectures and the lecture notes will be available on iLearn. Each week, students will also be required to complete the set readings and relate them to the lecture material.  Students should use the set tutorial questions in the unit schedule to orient their reading of relevant materials.

All students are expected to contribute to group discussions and, as this is a unit that explicitly taps into topical issues in the context of the Australian nation, students are expected to follow current developments in government policy, the media, and so on, and to related these developments to the issues under discussion.

For lecture times and classes, please consult the MQ timetable website: http://www.timetables.mq.edu.au. This website will display up-to-date information on your classes and classroom locations.

Required Texts: CUL321 Reader

The CUL321 Unit Reader is available for purchase from the CoOp Bookshop. If you have any issues buying or finding a copy of the unit reader, please inform Jillian Kramer via email at jillian.kramer@mq.edu.au 

 

REQUIRED TEXT: CUL321 READER: Racialised Punishment and the Construction of the Nation

Recommended texts:

Agamben, Giorgio, Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1998)

Agamben, Giorgio, State of Exception (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005)

Anderson, Warwick, The Cultivation of Whiteness (Melbourne: Melbourne University Press, 2002)

Ang, Ien, Sharon Chalmers, Lisa Law and Mandy Thomas (eds.), Alter/Asians (Annandale: Pluto Press, 2000)

Bahbha, H, Nation and Narration (London: Routledge, 1990)

Beaumont, Joan, Ilma Martinuzzi O’Brien and Matthew Trinca, Under Suspicion: Citizenship and Internment in Australia during the Second World War (Canberra: National Museum of Australia, 2008)

Blake, Thom, Dumping Ground: A History of the Cherbourg Settlement (St Lucia: University of Queensland Press, 2001)

Bonuto, Osvaldo, A Migrant’s Story (St Lucia: University of Queensland Press, 1994).

Burke, Anthony (2001) In Fear of Security: Australia’s Invasion Anxiety (Annandale: Pluto Press)

Corlett, David, Following Them Home: The Fate of the Returned Asylum Seekers (Melbourne: Black Inc., 2005)

Couchman, Sophie, John Fitzgerald and Paul Macgregor (eds.), After the Rush: Regulaiton, Participation, and Chinese Communities in Australia 1860-1940 (Fitzroy, Vic.: Otherland, 2004)

Crock, Mary, Ben Saul and Azadeh Dastyari, Future Seekers II: Refugees and Irregular Migration in Australia (Annandale, NSW: Federation Press, 2006)

Cuneen, Chris, David Fraser and Stephen Tomsen, Faces of Hate: Hate Crime in Australia.  (Annandale: Hawkins Press, 1997)

Davis, Angela Y., Are Prisons Obselete? (New York: Seven Stories Press, 2003)

de Certeau, Michel, The Capture of Speech and Other Political Writings (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1997)

de Certeau, Michel, Luce Giard and Pierre Mayol, The Practice of Everyday Life, vol. 2 (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1998)

Donald, James and Ali Rattansi (eds.), 'Race,' Culture and Difference (London: Sage Publications, 1993)

Frankenberg, Ruth, The Social Construction of Whiteness: White Women, Race Matters (London: Routledge, 1993)

Foucault, M, The History of Sexuality.  Trans. Robert Hurley (London: Penguin, 1990)

Giannacopuolos, Maria, “Tampa: Violence at the Border,” Social Semiotics, 15.1 (2005): 29-47.

Giannacopoulos, Maria, “Mabo, Tampa and the Non-Justiciability of Sovereignty,” in S. Perera (ed.), Our Patch (Perth: Network, 2007.

Gleeson, Jane, M. A. Hamilton, G. Morgan, M. Wynne-Jones, Marrickville Backyards (Dulwich Hill: Marrickville Community History Group, 2001)

Grimshaw, Patricia et al, Creating a Nation (Ringwood: McPhee Gribble, 1994)

Hage, G,  White Nation (Annandale: Pluto Press, 1998)

Hall, Stuart, David Held and Tony McGrew (eds.), Modernity and Its Futures (Cambridge: Polity Press in Association with the Open University, 1992)

Heiss, Anita, Token Koori (Sydney: Curringa Communications, 1998)

Heiss, Anita, Dhuuluu-Yala (To Talk Straight): Publishing Aboriginal Literature (Canberra: Aboriginal Studies Press, 2003)

Hill, Mike (ed.), Whiteness: A Critical Reader (New York: New York University Press, 1997)

Hodson, Michael, “Government Lies Again – Tiwi Islanders: ‘We’re all non-Australians’”  fromGreen Left Weekly http://www.greenleft.org.au and

http://www.greenleft.org.au/back/2003/562/562p7b.htm

hooks, bell, Yearning: Race, Gender, and Cultural Politics (Boston: South End Press, 1990)

Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission (HREOC), A Last Resort: A summary guide to the National Inquiry into Children in Immigration Detention (Sydney: HREOC, 2004)

Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commisssion (HREOC), IsmaÎ -- Listen: National consultations on eliminating prejudice against Arab and Muslim Australians (Sydney: HREOC, 2001)

Jakubowicz, Andrew et al, Racism, Ethnicity and the Media (St Leonards: Allen & Unwin, 1991994)

Leach, Michael and Fethi Mausouri, Lives in Limbo (Sydney: University of New South Wales Press, 2004)

Lygo, Iain, News Overboard: The Tabloid Media, Race Politics and Islam (n.p.: Southerly Change Media, 2004)

Nakayama, Thomas K. and Judith N. Martin (ed.), Whiteness: The Communication of Social Identity (Thousand Oaks: Sage, 1999)

Mitchell, D. T. and S. Snyder, Cultural Locations of Disability (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2006)

Moores, Irene (ed.), Voices of Aboriginal Australia (Springwood: Butterfly Books, 1995)

Moreton-Robinson (ed.), Whitening Race (Canberra: Aboriginal Studies Press, 2004)

Morton-Robinson, Aileen, “The Possessive Logic of Patriachal White Sovereignty,” Borderlands ejournal 3.2 at: http://www.borderlandsejournal.adelaide.edu.au/vol3no2_2004/moreton-possessive.html

Moreton-Robinson, Aileen, “The House that Jack Built: Britishness and White Possession,” Australian Critical Race and Whiteness Studies Association Journal, 1 (2005): 21-29.

Osuri, Goldie, “Regimes of Terror: Contesting the War on Terror,” Borderlands ejournal 5.1 at: http://www.borderlandsejournal.adelaide.edu.au/vol5no1/osuri.html

Osuri, Goldie and Bobby Banerjee, “White Diasporas: Media Representations of September 11 and the Unbearable Whiteness of Being Australian,” Social Semiotics, 14.2: 151-171.

Palombo, Lara, “Whose Turn Is It?  White Diasporic and Transnational Practices and the Necropolitics of the Plantation and Internment Camps,” Australian Critical Race and Whiteness Studies Association e-journal, 3.1 (2007: 1-20.

Perera, Suvendrini, Australia and the Insular Imagination: Beaches, Borders, Boats, and Bodies (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).

Perera, Suvendrini, “The Impossible Refugee of Western Desire” at  http://www.lines-magazine.org/

Perera, Suvendrini, “What is a camp…? Borderlands 1.1 (2002), at http://www.boderlandsejournal.adelaide.edu.au/vol1no1_2002/perera.html 

Perera, Suvendrini, “A Line in the Sea: The Tampa, Boat Stories and the Border,” Cultural Studies Review 8 (2002): 11-27.

Perera, Suvendrini,“Whiteness and Its Discontents,” Journal of Intercultural Studies 20.2 (1999): 183-198

Perera, Suvendrini (ed.), Our Patch (Perth: Network, 2007).

Poynting, Scott, Greg Noble, Paul Tabar and Jock Collins, Bin Laden in the Suburbs: Criminalising the Arab Other (Sydney: Sydney Institute of Criminology, 2004)

Pugliese, Joseph, “Penal Asylum: Refugees, Ethics, Hospitality,” Borderlands ejournal at: http://www.borderlandsejournal.adelaide.edu.au/vol1no1_2002/pugliese.html

Pugliese, Joseph, “The Locus of the Non: The Racial Fault Line ‘of Middle Eastern Appearance,” Borderlands ejournal at: http://www.borderlandsejournal.adelaide.edu.au/vol2no3/pugliese.html

Pugliese, Joseph, “Each Death is the First Death,” HEAT, 6 (2003): 7-12.

Pugliese, Joseph, “Subcutaneous Law: Embodying the Migration Amendment Act 1992,” The Australian Feminist Law Journal, 21 (2004): 23-34.

Pugliese, Joseph, “Asymmetries of Terror,” Borderlands ejournal at: http://www.borderlandsejournal.adelaide.edu.au/vol5no1_2005/pugliese.html 

Pugliese, Joseph, “Diasporic Architecture, Whiteness and the Cultural Politics of Space,” in Sudeep Dasgupta (ed.), Constellations of the Transnational (Amesterdam: Rodopi, 2007), pp. 23-50.

Roediger, D., Towards an Abolition of Whiteness (London: Verso, 1994)

Sedgewick, Eve Kosofsky, Epistemology of the Closet  (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1990)

Snyder, Sharon L. and David T. Mitchell, Cultural Locations of Disability (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006).

Snyder, Sharon L. and David T. Mitchell, A World Without Bodies (Chicago: Brace Yourself Productions, 2002)

Spivak, G C, In Other Worlds (New York and London: Methuen, 1987)

Spivak, G C, The Post-Colonial Critic (London and New York: Routledge, 1990)

Thadenka, Learning to Be White (New York: Continuum, 2000)

Watson, Irene, “Aboriginal Sovereignties: Past, Present and Future (Im)Possibilities,” in Suvendrini Perera (ed.), Our Patch (Perth: Network, 2007), pp. 23-44.

Watson, Irene, “Buried Alive,” Law and Critique 13 (2000): 253-269.

Unit Schedule

Week 1: Introduction 

Readings: Michael Hodson, “Government Lies Again – Tiwi Islanders: ‘We’re all non-Australians’” from Green Left Weekly http://www.greenleft.org.au

http://www.greenleft.org.au/back/2003/562/562p7b.htm

Tony Birch, “The Last Refuge of the ‘un-Australian’”

Suvendrini Perera, “Girt by Sea”

 

WEEK 2: Contested Histories and Aboriginal Sovereignties

Screening: “Black Man’s Houses”

Readings: Ian Anderson, “Re-claiming Tru-ger-nan-ner: Decolonizing the Symbol”

Irene Watson, “Aboriginal Sovereignties: Past, Present and Future (Im)Possibilities”

First Nations Interim National Unity Government, “Declarations of Independence Advanced at Brisbane Treaty Talks”

Murrawarri Republic, “Queen Recognises Murrawarri Republic”

Questions:

  1. Discuss what Anderson means when he says that Tru-ger-nan-ner signifies the “land empty of natives and the colonial period over.”
  2. Discuss the problematic concepts of “authentic” and “hybrid” Aboriginals – with specific reference to Anderson’s essay and  Blackman’s Houses.
  3. What needs to be done in order to recognise Aboriginal sovereignties?
  4. Discuss the political, legal and cultural ramifications of Irene Watson’s call for Aboriginal sovereignties.

 

WEEK 3: Whiteness

Readings:  K. E. Supryia, “White Difference”

Ruth Frankenberg, “Thinking Through Race”

Anita Heiss, “Invisible Whiteness” and “My Best Friend is White”

Questions: 

  1. How is whiteness “invisible”?  What are the key attributes of whiteness?
  2. How is whiteness about power, privilege and institutionality?
  3. What does Frankeberg mean by the “colour and power evasiveness” of whiteness?
  4. How does, according to Frankenberg, whiteness normalise race privilege?
  5. How does Hiess make whiteness visible in her poems?  What Black tactics does she deploy in order to counter-act white racism?

 

WEEK 4: The Racialisation of Punishment

Readings: Chris Cuneen, “The Nature of Colonial Policing”

Gerry Georgato, “The Burning Issue of Deaths in Custody: Aboriginal People Die 5 Times the Rate of Apartheid South Africa”

Natasha Robinson, “Black Sentences Soar as Juvenile Jails Become a ‘Storing House’”

Angela  Davis, “Race and Criminalization”

Angela Davis, “The Prison Industrial Complex”

Questions: 

  1. Discuss in detail the nature of colonial policing?
  2. How does the history of colonial policing fundamentally inform contemporary relations between Aboriginals and the law?
  3. According to Davis, what is the relation between race and the punishment industry?  You must discuss, in particular, the connection between racialised minorities and the political economics of prisons.
  4. Explain and discuss the “prison industrial complex” in the context of Australia’s Refugee Detention Centres.

 

WEEK 5: Aboriginal Law Versus Colonial Law

Readings: Irene Watson, “Buried Alive”

Shaunnagh Dorsett and Shaun McVeigh, “Just So: ‘The Law Which Governs Australia Is Australian Law’”

Screaning: Dhakiyarr vs the King

Questions:

  1. Define the legal concept of terra nullius and discuss in detail its impact on Australia’s Indigenous peoples.
  2. Discuss Watson’s understanding of Aboriginal law and how it differs from European law.
  3. How does white common law ensure the reproduction of colonial possession of the continent of Australia?
  4. Discuss the collision of Aboriginal law and white colonial law in the context of Dhakiyarr vs the King.

 

WEEK 6: The Racialisation of Crime and Cultural Panics

Readings: Jock Collins et al, “Crime and Ethnicity in Australia: Myths and Realities”

Scott Pointing et al, “The Arab Other”

David Fraser et al, “Violence Against Arab Australians”

Joseph Pugliese, “The Locus of the Non: The Racial Fault-Line ‘of Middle Eastern Appearance,’” Borderlands e-journal 2.3 at: http://www.borderlandsejournal.adelaide.edu.au/vol2no3_2003/pugliese_non.htm.

Questions:

  1. What is problematic about the ethnic descriptor “of Middle Eastern appearance” as used by both the police and the media?
  2. Discuss the relationship between issues of class, gender and ethnicity in Of Middle Eastern Appearance.
  3. Discuss the role of government and the media in creating cultural panics about “ethnic crime” and “ethnic gangs.”
  4. Explain what is at stake in the use of qualifiers like the term “ethnic” in the discussion of crime and criminal behaviour.

 

MID-SEMESTER BREAK

WEEK 7: READING WEEK

WEEK 8: The Camp and Histories of Internment

Readings: Suvendrini Perera, “What is a camp…? Borderlands 1.1 (2002), at http://www.boderlandsejournal.adelaide.edu.au/

David Mitchell and Sharon Snyder, “The Eugenic Atlantic: Disability and the Making of an International Science”

“William Cooper: The Aboriginal Who Stood up to Hitler”

Osvaldo Bonuto, “’J’accuse’: Internment”

Lara Palombo, “Whose Turn Is It?  White Diasporic and Transnational Practices and the Necropolitics of the Plantation and Internment Camps”

Questions:

  1. Discuss the importance of the camp in the construction of the nation, its aliens and its borders, with reference to the Perera and Palombo essays.
  2. What is the relation between 9/11 and the internment of aliens during World War II?
  3. Discuss the use of science by politicians and the military in the internment and eventual extermination of people with disabilities in the context of the Nazi death camps, with reference to the Mitchell and Snyder essays.
  4. What are the key issues that Bonuto’s story of internment exposes?
  5. Discuss the contemporary interment of aliens (eg, refugees, people of  “Middle Eastern appearance,” and the prisoners at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba).

 

WEEK 9: The Cultural Politics of Suburban Space and Ethnic Architecture

Mirjana Lozanovka, “Abjection and Architecture: The Migrant House in Multicultural Australia”

Said and Souad Lahoud “It’s In the Blood: Culture and Identity and Their Suburban Backyard”

Joseph Pugliese, “A Topolitology of Mourning: Practices of Mourning and the Diasporic Transpositions of Space”

Joseph Pugliese, “Migrant Heritage in an Indigenous Context”

Questions:

  1. What is the relation between migrant architecture, hegemonic concepts of nation/identity and abjection?
  2. Discuss the dismissal of migrant architecture, house styles and decoration in terms of “kitsch.”  Examine the value system operating in these acts of condescension.
  3. How is the suburban backyard a site of resistance and a refuge against assimilation ideologies?
  4. How is the home “a place for the body, a place for life?” Discuss in detail.
  5. Discuss the significance of locating migrant heritage within an Indigenous context.

 

WEEK 10:  “Fighting with Our Tongues”: Indigenous Life Writings

Readings: Jackie Huggins, selections from Auntie Rita

Tess Allas, “A Stitch in Time”

William Ferguson and John Patten, “Cries from the Heart: Aborigines Claim Citizen Rights!”

Aileen Moreton-Robinson, “Tellin’ It Straight: Self-Representation within Indigenous Women’s Life Writings”

Jackie Huggins, “Auntie Rita’s File”

Anita Heiss, “Indigenous Writing and Identity”

Questions: 

  1. Discuss the importance of the oral history genre in Auntie Rita.
  2. Discuss the significance of the narrative weave of two voices in Auntie Rita.
  3. What is the relationship between “life writing” and dominant histories as dramatised in Auntie Rita and as discussed by Heiss and Moreton-Robinson?
  4. Discuss the history of white women’s role in the colonial subjugation of Aboriginal people 
  5. What are the tactics of resistance against colonial power as articulated by both Huggins and Moreton-Robinson?

 

WEEK 11: At the Border: Australia’s Refugees and Asylum Seekers

Screening: “The Man Who Jumped”

Readings: Suvendrini Perera, “A Line in the Sea: The Tampa, Boat Stories and the Border”

Joseph Pugliese, “The Recknoning of Possibles: Asylum Seekers, Justice and the Indigenisation of the Levinasian Third”

Ray Jackson, “An Open Letter to Kevin Rudd MP”

Ray Jackson, “Indigenous Leader to Asylum Seekers: ‘You are Welcome Here’”

Bianca Hall, “Overwhelming Majority of Boat Arrivals Deemed to Be Refugees”

Maria Giannacopoulos, “Tampa: Violence at the Border”

Questions: 

  1. Discuss the historical roots of white Australia’s fear of  “alien invasions.”
  2. Discuss the relation between Indigenous sovereignty, white colonial possession and Australia’s refugee crisis.
  3. How does the mandatory imprisonment of refugees and asylum seekers contravene Human Rights (as outlined by UN charters)?
  4. Discuss the ethnicity of the refugees and asylum seekers imprisoned in Australian prisons. 
  5. How can the mandatory imprisonment of refugees be seen as another form of racialised punishment?  Relate this to Angela Davis’ thesis on the racialised punishment industry and Australia’s use of the private company ACM to manage the prisons.
  6. Discuss the role of law in the construction and maintenance of a regime of penal asylum for refugees and asylum seekers.

 

WEEK 12: The Politics of Fear and Terror

Readings: Goldie Osuri: “Regimes of Terror: Contesting the War on Terror”

Joseph Pugliese, “Asymmetries of Terror”

Suvendrini Perera, “Race Terror, Sydney, December 2005”

All three essays are in Borderlands ejournal available at:

http://www.borderlandsejournal.adelaide.edu.au/issues/vol5no1.html

Questions:

  1. Discuss the parallels between contemporary political uses of fear and terror and the historical period of the Cold War.
  2. What is at stake in the government and media fostering of a politics of fear and terror?
  3. Why must the concept of “terrorism” be thought outside of eurocentric discourses and what is so often left unaddressed in western discussions of terrorism?
  4. What needs to be done in order to begin to dismantle regimes of fear and terror?

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Additional information

MMCCS website https://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/faculties_and_departments/faculty_of_arts/department_of_media_music_communication_and_cultural_studies/

MMCCS Session Re-mark Application http://www.mq.edu.au/pubstatic/public/download/?id=167914

Information is correct at the time of publication

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate critical skills, informed by cultural theories, that will enable students to understand the ways in which the categories of nation and national identity are inscribed with a series of normative values that function to construct othered subjects that are disenfranchised and/or excluded from the official corpus of nation.
  • Develop the ability to synthesise and articulate the relations between knowledge and power in the context of nation.
  • Deploy analytical skills that enable students critically to evaluate institutions of authority in order to disclose such things as institutional racism and other discriminatory practices.
  • Develop ethical skills that will enable students to address issues of cultural difference and social justice concerns within the context of the Australian nation and its relation to global events and issues.
  • Deploy critical argumentation skills that will enable students to support and materially evidence their particular viewpoints on contentious national issues.
  • Employ cultural literacy skills that will enable students to address issues concerned with cultural difference in an informed manner.
  • Develop socially active and responsible skills that will enable students to analyse and solve problems.

Assessment tasks

  • Engagement & Participation
  • Critical Analysis
  • Policy Briefing Paper
  • Final Essay

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate critical skills, informed by cultural theories, that will enable students to understand the ways in which the categories of nation and national identity are inscribed with a series of normative values that function to construct othered subjects that are disenfranchised and/or excluded from the official corpus of nation.
  • Develop the ability to synthesise and articulate the relations between knowledge and power in the context of nation.
  • Deploy analytical skills that enable students critically to evaluate institutions of authority in order to disclose such things as institutional racism and other discriminatory practices.
  • Develop ethical skills that will enable students to address issues of cultural difference and social justice concerns within the context of the Australian nation and its relation to global events and issues.
  • Deploy critical argumentation skills that will enable students to support and materially evidence their particular viewpoints on contentious national issues.
  • Employ cultural literacy skills that will enable students to address issues concerned with cultural difference in an informed manner.
  • Develop socially active and responsible skills that will enable students to analyse and solve problems.

Assessment tasks

  • Engagement & Participation
  • Critical Analysis
  • Policy Briefing Paper
  • Final Essay

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop the ability to synthesise and articulate the relations between knowledge and power in the context of nation.
  • Deploy analytical skills that enable students critically to evaluate institutions of authority in order to disclose such things as institutional racism and other discriminatory practices.
  • Develop ethical skills that will enable students to address issues of cultural difference and social justice concerns within the context of the Australian nation and its relation to global events and issues.
  • Deploy critical argumentation skills that will enable students to support and materially evidence their particular viewpoints on contentious national issues.
  • Employ cultural literacy skills that will enable students to address issues concerned with cultural difference in an informed manner.
  • Develop socially active and responsible skills that will enable students to analyse and solve problems.

Assessment tasks

  • Engagement & Participation
  • Critical Analysis
  • Policy Briefing Paper
  • Final Essay

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop the ability to synthesise and articulate the relations between knowledge and power in the context of nation.
  • Develop ethical skills that will enable students to address issues of cultural difference and social justice concerns within the context of the Australian nation and its relation to global events and issues.
  • Deploy critical argumentation skills that will enable students to support and materially evidence their particular viewpoints on contentious national issues.
  • Develop socially active and responsible skills that will enable students to analyse and solve problems.

Assessment tasks

  • Engagement & Participation
  • Critical Analysis
  • Policy Briefing Paper
  • Final Essay

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop the ability to synthesise and articulate the relations between knowledge and power in the context of nation.
  • Deploy analytical skills that enable students critically to evaluate institutions of authority in order to disclose such things as institutional racism and other discriminatory practices.
  • Develop ethical skills that will enable students to address issues of cultural difference and social justice concerns within the context of the Australian nation and its relation to global events and issues.
  • Deploy critical argumentation skills that will enable students to support and materially evidence their particular viewpoints on contentious national issues.
  • Employ cultural literacy skills that will enable students to address issues concerned with cultural difference in an informed manner.
  • Develop socially active and responsible skills that will enable students to analyse and solve problems.

Assessment tasks

  • Engagement & Participation
  • Critical Analysis
  • Policy Briefing Paper
  • Final Essay

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate critical skills, informed by cultural theories, that will enable students to understand the ways in which the categories of nation and national identity are inscribed with a series of normative values that function to construct othered subjects that are disenfranchised and/or excluded from the official corpus of nation.
  • Develop the ability to synthesise and articulate the relations between knowledge and power in the context of nation.
  • Deploy analytical skills that enable students critically to evaluate institutions of authority in order to disclose such things as institutional racism and other discriminatory practices.
  • Develop ethical skills that will enable students to address issues of cultural difference and social justice concerns within the context of the Australian nation and its relation to global events and issues.
  • Deploy critical argumentation skills that will enable students to support and materially evidence their particular viewpoints on contentious national issues.
  • Employ cultural literacy skills that will enable students to address issues concerned with cultural difference in an informed manner.
  • Develop socially active and responsible skills that will enable students to analyse and solve problems.

Assessment tasks

  • Engagement & Participation
  • Critical Analysis
  • Policy Briefing Paper
  • Final Essay

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate critical skills, informed by cultural theories, that will enable students to understand the ways in which the categories of nation and national identity are inscribed with a series of normative values that function to construct othered subjects that are disenfranchised and/or excluded from the official corpus of nation.
  • Develop the ability to synthesise and articulate the relations between knowledge and power in the context of nation.
  • Deploy analytical skills that enable students critically to evaluate institutions of authority in order to disclose such things as institutional racism and other discriminatory practices.
  • Develop ethical skills that will enable students to address issues of cultural difference and social justice concerns within the context of the Australian nation and its relation to global events and issues.
  • Deploy critical argumentation skills that will enable students to support and materially evidence their particular viewpoints on contentious national issues.
  • Employ cultural literacy skills that will enable students to address issues concerned with cultural difference in an informed manner.
  • Develop socially active and responsible skills that will enable students to analyse and solve problems.

Assessment tasks

  • Engagement & Participation
  • Critical Analysis
  • Policy Briefing Paper
  • Final Essay

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Deploy analytical skills that enable students critically to evaluate institutions of authority in order to disclose such things as institutional racism and other discriminatory practices.
  • Develop ethical skills that will enable students to address issues of cultural difference and social justice concerns within the context of the Australian nation and its relation to global events and issues.
  • Deploy critical argumentation skills that will enable students to support and materially evidence their particular viewpoints on contentious national issues.
  • Employ cultural literacy skills that will enable students to address issues concerned with cultural difference in an informed manner.
  • Develop socially active and responsible skills that will enable students to analyse and solve problems.

Assessment tasks

  • Engagement & Participation
  • Critical Analysis
  • Policy Briefing Paper
  • Final Essay

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Deploy analytical skills that enable students critically to evaluate institutions of authority in order to disclose such things as institutional racism and other discriminatory practices.
  • Develop ethical skills that will enable students to address issues of cultural difference and social justice concerns within the context of the Australian nation and its relation to global events and issues.
  • Deploy critical argumentation skills that will enable students to support and materially evidence their particular viewpoints on contentious national issues.
  • Employ cultural literacy skills that will enable students to address issues concerned with cultural difference in an informed manner.
  • Develop socially active and responsible skills that will enable students to analyse and solve problems.

Assessment tasks

  • Engagement & Participation
  • Critical Analysis
  • Policy Briefing Paper
  • Final Essay