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SOC 295 – Work and Employment

2017 – S2 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Lecturer and course convenor
Norbert Ebert
Contact via Email
by appointment
Head tutor for external students
Charlotte Overgaard
Contact via Email
Head tutor for internal students
Kais Al-Momani
Contact via Email
On campus tutor
Evelyn Honeywill
Contact via Email
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
12cp at 100 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
Work and employment are basic social experiences. How can we understand them and why are they so important to us? This unit searches for answers by applying sociological key concepts to contemporary work and employment issues. The unit is made up of three parts. The first part examines the relevance of work for individuals and society. In the second part we investigate the organisation of work and employment on a political, organisational and individual level. The final part deals with our experience of work. It contemplates the future of work in terms of work-life balance and the chances for individuals' self-realisation. On the basis of those three parts you will gain a clear understanding of work and employment in contemporary societies.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. 1. Identify the characteristics of contemporary work societies and the prevalence of work and employment for individual, organisational and social wellbeing. 2. Recognise the risks and opportunities originating in the organisation, structures and processes characterising work societies. 3. Integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments to understand the link between economic and social roles of work and employment for individuals and societies. 4. Students will learn how to think sociologically about work and employment.

General Assessment Information

How to get the most out of SOC295

SOC295 Work and Employment has a simple and easy to follow structure. It is based on the idea of learning in three ways: reading about, listening to and writing about key ideas, topics and concepts. Every week follows this pattern with a clear focus on a key question.

  1. READING: The reading(s) provide you with essential information around the key question. If possible, do the readings before you come to the lectures.
  2. LISTENING: Every lecture identifies and addresses a key question in relation to work and employment.
  3. WRITING: Once you have done the reading(s) and listened to the lecture, it is time to discuss with other students (online or in the on campus tutorials) how to write an answer to the key question. Finally, in the writing tasks you articulate in your own words how the key question can be answered using the course material.

The assessments in SOC295 build on linking these three components of the course. Following those three steps will enable you to do well in SOC295 an not much extra work is needed.

How to submit the assignments

The writing tasks 1 and 2 have to be submitted via the turnitin links on iLearn by 11.59pm on the due date. You can submit your assignment only ONCE! Please do not panic if you (for whatever reason) submit your assignment a few minutes late. We will not deduct marks for that. Your grades will be made available on gradebook on iLearn too, but remain subject to change until the end of the course and depend on your overall performance in the course.

How to deal with difficulties

The first rule is let your tutor know asap. The sooner we know, the sooner we can help. In particular there is little we can do to help you once the due date of assignments has passed.

The second rule is, please bring your questions to the tutorials /discussion boards and ask your tutor before you individually emailing us. Often others have the same questions about referencing or contents related questions. Generally, the advice is to ask as early as possible and not avoid asking.

For issue affecting your performance, but which are unrelated to the course contents and prevent your from participating in tutorials or from submitting assignments or from completing the unit, please let us know and visit www.ask.mq.edu.au where you can submit the appropriate application including the required documentation. This is essential to grant you extensions in particular beyond the enf of semester if required.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Tutorial participation 20% ongoing
Weekly quiz 20% week 2 - 11
Writing task 1 30% 01/09/2017
Writing task 2 30% 27/10/2017

Tutorial participation

Due: ongoing
Weighting: 20%

SOC295 is structured around weekly key questions. Every lecture provides you with information on what is involved in a possible answer to the key question. For your writing task too, you need to choose a key question and try to answer it in your own words as best as you can.

Tutorials in SOC295 have a clear goal: Based on the lecture material and the reading(s), the tutorial is the space where you learn how to successfully answer a key question in assignment 1 and 2 (writing tasks). By discussion exactly that, you automatically repeat and learn the course contents.

For external students participation requires discussions on iLearn and we encourage you to share and discuss with others how you would answer the key question of the week. You can also share other thoughts about concepts, ideas, examples and discuss them with others.

We expect you to post within a week after the lecture (Tuesday). There are no extensions possible. Should you have problems or serious reasons for not being able to post within a week, please let the tutor for external students (charlotte.overgaard@mq.edu.au) know.

For internal students it requires tutorial attendance and we encourage you to share and discuss with others how you would answer the key question of the week by bringing a draft to the on campus tutorial.

Participation means to think and discuss with others how to answer the key question of a given week in preparation for your writing tasks. Your contribution will be assessed on the basis of your familiarity and understanding of the weekly course contents from the lecture and the reading(s). Discussion means further that you are required to engage with others. The focus is not so much the quantity, but the quality of your contributions.

The tutorials will provide you with clear guidance on how to structure your assignment, what the key points are you need to include and define. This way, you automatically repeat, discuss and learn the course contents.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Identify the characteristics of contemporary work societies and the prevalence of work and employment for individual, organisational and social wellbeing. 2. Recognise the risks and opportunities originating in the organisation, structures and processes characterising work societies. 3. Integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments to understand the link between economic and social roles of work and employment for individuals and societies. 4. Students will learn how to think sociologically about work and employment.

Weekly quiz

Due: week 2 - 11
Weighting: 20%

Internal as well as an external students are required to complete a basic quiz each week on iLearn. The purpose of the quiz - as with any other task in this unit - is to prepare you for the writing tasks. It makes sure you identify and know the key points needed to answer the key question.

The quiz questions focus on the basic contents from the lecture and the reading(s) and they will help you identify the main points from a week which should also be mentioned in your online participation and ultimately in your writing task when answering a key question.

The essentials about the quizzes are as follows:

  • The quizzes are based on the content of the lecture and the reading(s).
  • There is a total of 10 quizzes. Each quiz comprises four question and is worth a total of 2 marks (0.5 per question).
  • The first quiz will open in week 2, the last one in week 11.
  • Each week you have 6 DAYS to complete the quiz. Quizzes always open on Wednesdays 6pm and close on Tuesdays 10.30am.

HINT: Start early on the quiz, do not leave it to the last minute

IMPORTANT: There are no extensions possible including for last-minute technical problems or forgetting to 'save and submit'. If you miss a quiz you will need to provide documentation for the entire time the quiz was open in order to apply for special consideration. The convenor and tutors will not respond to emails requesting to reopen quizzes, to extend deadlines or open quizzes early. Remember, before you submit you can save and retry as many times as you like, but once you save and submit, you cannot change your answers. 

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Identify the characteristics of contemporary work societies and the prevalence of work and employment for individual, organisational and social wellbeing. 2. Recognise the risks and opportunities originating in the organisation, structures and processes characterising work societies. 3. Integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments to understand the link between economic and social roles of work and employment for individuals and societies. 4. Students will learn how to think sociologically about work and employment.

Writing task 1

Due: 01/09/2017
Weighting: 30%

The point of the Writing Task (800 words) is that you engage in depth with ONE of the weekly topics (from week 2-5) that has been covered before the due date (you cannot choose the same topic again for your second writing task).

Your exercise should:

a) identify the key question of the chosen week and give a short basic answer which you then explain in more detail.

b) clearly name, define and explain in your own words the key concepts of the chosen week.

c) refer to and reference the reading(s) of the chosen week to back up your key points and demonstrate your understanding of the reading

What you are NOT supposed to do:

a) Do NOT exceed 800 words. The 10% rule does NOT apply!

b) Do NOT reference the lecturer or the lecture slides! 

c) Do NOT copy the quotes used in the lecture from the reading into your assignment, but find your own.

d) Do NOT use readings or other materials other than the ones provided by the course.

The writing task is not an essay. It does not require an introduction or a conclusion. Focus on the key question of the week.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Identify the characteristics of contemporary work societies and the prevalence of work and employment for individual, organisational and social wellbeing. 2. Recognise the risks and opportunities originating in the organisation, structures and processes characterising work societies. 3. Integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments to understand the link between economic and social roles of work and employment for individuals and societies. 4. Students will learn how to think sociologically about work and employment.

Writing task 2

Due: 27/10/2017
Weighting: 30%

The second writing task is exactly the same as the first one (see above). However, we expect you to take the feedback you received in writing task 1 seriously and improve accordingly.

You can choose any week that has been covered up to the due date except the one you have chosen for writing task 1 and except weeks 7 and 9!


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Identify the characteristics of contemporary work societies and the prevalence of work and employment for individual, organisational and social wellbeing. 2. Recognise the risks and opportunities originating in the organisation, structures and processes characterising work societies. 3. Integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments to understand the link between economic and social roles of work and employment for individuals and societies. 4. Students will learn how to think sociologically about work and employment.

Delivery and Resources

All lectures will be recorded and will be available through iLearn. The readings used in this course are available through a link on iLearn. 

Online tutorials are also being delivered through iLearn.

Should you encounter any IT problems, please contact IT directly via One Help.

Unit Schedule

1

01/08/2017

Introduction to SOC295 (no tutorials this week)

2

08/08/2017

Modernity and Work

3

15/08/2017

Work and Capitalism

4

22/08/2017

Work and Productivity

5

29/08/2017

Work, Science and Technology

  01/09/2017 Assignment 1 is due (30%) 

6

05/09/2017

Work, Organisation and the Individual

7

12/09/2017

Corporations, Companies and Firms

 

19/09/2017

mid-session break

 

26/09/2017

mid-session break

8

03/10/2017

Work and (Un)Employment

9

10/10/2017

Capitalism: A Love Story

10

17/10/2017

Work and Motivation

11

24/10/2017

Work, Gender and Identity

  27/10/2017 Assignment 2 is due (30%)

12

31/10/2017

Precarious Work Societies

13

07/11/2017

Conclusion (no tutorials this week)

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • 1. Identify the characteristics of contemporary work societies and the prevalence of work and employment for individual, organisational and social wellbeing. 2. Recognise the risks and opportunities originating in the organisation, structures and processes characterising work societies. 3. Integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments to understand the link between economic and social roles of work and employment for individuals and societies. 4. Students will learn how to think sociologically about work and employment.

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial participation
  • Weekly quiz
  • Writing task 1
  • Writing task 2

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • 1. Identify the characteristics of contemporary work societies and the prevalence of work and employment for individual, organisational and social wellbeing. 2. Recognise the risks and opportunities originating in the organisation, structures and processes characterising work societies. 3. Integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments to understand the link between economic and social roles of work and employment for individuals and societies. 4. Students will learn how to think sociologically about work and employment.

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial participation
  • Weekly quiz
  • Writing task 1
  • Writing task 2

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly quiz
  • Writing task 1
  • Writing task 2

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • 1. Identify the characteristics of contemporary work societies and the prevalence of work and employment for individual, organisational and social wellbeing. 2. Recognise the risks and opportunities originating in the organisation, structures and processes characterising work societies. 3. Integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments to understand the link between economic and social roles of work and employment for individuals and societies. 4. Students will learn how to think sociologically about work and employment.

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial participation
  • Writing task 1
  • Writing task 2

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • 1. Identify the characteristics of contemporary work societies and the prevalence of work and employment for individual, organisational and social wellbeing. 2. Recognise the risks and opportunities originating in the organisation, structures and processes characterising work societies. 3. Integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments to understand the link between economic and social roles of work and employment for individuals and societies. 4. Students will learn how to think sociologically about work and employment.

Assessment task

  • Tutorial participation

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • 1. Identify the characteristics of contemporary work societies and the prevalence of work and employment for individual, organisational and social wellbeing. 2. Recognise the risks and opportunities originating in the organisation, structures and processes characterising work societies. 3. Integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments to understand the link between economic and social roles of work and employment for individuals and societies. 4. Students will learn how to think sociologically about work and employment.

Assessment tasks

  • Writing task 1
  • Writing task 2

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment tasks

  • Weekly quiz
  • Writing task 1
  • Writing task 2

BEFORE posting general questions on iLearn

Most of your questions will have been answered in the lectures, the course guide or by your tutor, so PLEASE look there before asking simple questions to everyone on iLearn and listen and read carefully.

Please understand the we will not be able to answer individual and repetitive questions if the information is either available in the unit guide or has been provided during the lectures and tutorials. Please also read our answers to others on iLearn since you might have exactly the same questions. Again, if the question has been posted and answered before, we will not answer again.

Thank you for your understanding!

 

General assessment criteria for writing exercises

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA SOC295 (writing exercises)

The following is only an indication and cannot be strictly applied to your assessment. It should, however, give you an idea of what the requirements are.

Knowledge: Understanding of key question and ideas, key points / concepts, components of lecture topic and their interrelationships (e.g. sociological timeline).

Application: Ability to explain and engage with sociological ideas and frameworks presented in the relevant week in a critically reflective way / in own words.

Presentation: The extent to which the work has been written and presented in a manner consistent with academic standards.

HD

Knowledge: Your assignment shows an insightful, comprehensive, and satisfactory engagement with the course contents. You convey an advanced understanding of the complexities of knowledge crucial to the chosen week. The work systematically and critically addresses the key question. There is evidence of an excellent understanding of the inter-relationships between theoretical concepts and ideas. You show how they relate to questions of work and employment and the idea of a work society.

Application: Your assignment demonstrates a capacity to use course material to critically reflect on work and employment in your own words. You show the ability to select the relevant knowledge, define concepts clearly and correctly. You demonstrate the ability to apply the weekly material to the overarching questions of differentiation and integration.

Presentation: The work has been written and presented to an exemplary academic standard. You use the reading in a clear and meaningful way to back up your points. Your reference style is in line with academic writing standards.

D

Knowledge: Your assignment shows a comprehensive and satisfactory treatment of all the task requirements. You convey a good understanding of the complexities of knowledge crucial to the chosen week. While you demonstrate a good understanding of the inter-relationships between different knowledge components, some definitions remain vague and need to be formulated more systematically and clearly.

Application: Your assignment demonstrates some capacity to critically reflect on and identify the crucial aspect of a work society from this week. You show some ability to select the relevant knowledge and apply it to the overarching questions of differentiation and integration. Some crucial points are missing though and you need to answer the key question in a more integrated, precise and systematic fashion.

Presentation: The work has been written and presented to an acceptable academic standard. The way you use the reading to back up your points can be improved by making the connection between quote / reference and your point clearer. There are minor issues with your referencing style / formatting. Please have a look at, for example, The Journal of Sociology to see how it needs to be done.

Credit

Knowledge: Your assignment fulfills the required tasks only partially. You convey an incomplete understanding of the complexities of knowledge crucial to the chosen week. You mainly summarise the lecture material and rely too much on the lecture components. Some definitions are missing or wrong, remain vague and need to be formulated more systematically and precisely.

Application: Your assignment demonstrates only some capacity to critically reflect on and identify the crucial aspect of a work society from this week. Some relevant knowledge/concepts are missing and you do not engage with the overarching questions of differentiation and integration. You need to answer the key question in a more integrated, precise and systematic fashion by identifying the key components of the chosen week.

Presentation: The presentation and writing style of your assignment needs attention. Please make sure that you get some proofreading for your final assignment. The way you use the reading to back up your points is deficient and needs to be improved by making the connection between quote / reference and your point. Your referencing style / formatting does not fulfill academic standards. Please have a look at, for example, The Journal of Sociology to see how it needs to be done.

Pass

Knowledge: Your assignment barely fulfills the required tasks. You convey an incomplete understanding or even misunderstand the complexities of knowledge crucial to the chosen week. The key question remains mainly unanswered and you do not engage enough with the course material. Relevant components and definitions are missing or wrong, remain vague and need to be included systematically and clearly.

Application: Your assignment demonstrates very little capacity to critically reflect on and identify the crucial aspect of a work society from this week. Most relevant knowledge is either missing or misunderstood. You do not engage with the overarching questions of differentiation and integration. You need to answer the key question in an integrated and systematic fashion.

Presentation: The presentation and writing style of your assignment needs attention. Please make sure that you get some proofreading for your final assignment. You do not use the reading to back up your points and the connection between quote / reference /reading remains unclear. Your referencing style / formatting does not fulfill academic standards. Please have a look at, for example, The Journal of Sociology to see how it needs to be done and contact the Learning and Teaching Centre at the University.

Fail

Knowledge: You fail to address the task requirements in a satisfactory manner. The work conveys little evidence or understanding of the knowledge relevant to the chosen week. Your assignment fails to demonstrate a satisfactory grasp of the field of knowledge covered in the unit.

Application: Your assignment conveys very little evidence of the capacity to recognise when or how to engage with different contents from the chosen week. You do not reflect effectively and critically on the key aspect of work and employment from this week. Few connections are appropriately drawn between relevant concepts or aspects of work societies like integration and differentiation to which they are to be applied.

Presentation: Your assignment demonstrates little understanding or appreciation of standards required for academic writing. Improvements in terms of clarity, grammar, spelling, quotations, referencing or presentation are required to achieve an acceptable standard. Please have a look at, for example, The Journal of Sociology to see how it needs to be done or contact the Learning and Teaching Centre at university for assistance.

Information for External Students

As an external student in SOC295 you are required to listen to the lectures online via iLearn and do the weekly readings.

Your tutorial is the weekly online discussion forum. What on campus students do in classes on campus, you do in the discussion forum. That is you will engage in the weekly topic to discuss the main points and concepts which are crucial for your assignments. It is your responsibility to "attend" online regularly. The online engagement is the foundation for the two writing tasks. From experience students who engage in discussions are doing much better in the assignments.

SOC295 Work and Employment: List of Readings per Week

Week

Reading(s)

1

No reading

2

Beck U. (2000) The Brave New World of Work, Pp. 10-16, Polity Press: Cambridge.

3

Bell D. (1973) The Coming of Post-Industrial Society, Pp. 12-32, Basic Books: New York.

4

Ritzer G. 1993) The McDonaldization of Society, Pp. 18-34, Pine Forge Press: London

5

Blyton P. and Jenkins J. (2007) Key Concepts in Work, Technology, pp. 210-216, Sage: London.

Rifkin J. (2004) The End of Work, Pp. 3-14, Penguin Group: New York.

6

Blyton P. and Jenkins J. (2007) Key Concepts in Work, Alienation, pp. 11-16, Sage: London.

Blyton P. and Jenkins J. (2007) Key Concepts in Work, Emotional Labour, pp. 64-68, Sage: London.

Blyton P. and Jenkins J. (2007) Key Concepts in Work, Human Relations, pp. 93-97, Sage: London.

7

No reading

8

Blyton P. and Jenkins J. (2007) Key Concepts in Work, Unemployment and Underemployment, pp. 227-231, Sage: London.

Harvey D. (2007) A Brief History of Neoliberalism, pp. 1-4, Oxford University Press: Oxford.

9

No reading

10

Hughes J. A., Martin P. J. and Sharrock W. W. (1997) Understanding Classical Sociology, pp. 94-102, Sage: London.

11

Bohnet I. (2016) What Works. Gender Equality by Design,  pp. 1-17, The Belkamp Press of Harvard University Press: Cambridge & London.

12

Kalleberg A. L. (2009) Precarious Work, Insecure Workers: Employment Relations in Transition, American Sociological Review, Vol. 74, No. 1, pp. 1-22.

 

Changes since First Published

Date Description
25/07/2017 updated tutor's contact details