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CUL 350 – Cultural Contexts: Communities and Cultures in Action

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Anthony Lambert
Contact via anthony.lambert@mq.edu.au
Y3A 253 or Level 2 Admin Hub
Email for appointment
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Corequisites Corequisites
3cp in CUL units at 300 level
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit explores student participation in the representation of diverse communities and cultures. Students place their study experiences in a relationship with community and cultural contexts they have an interest in, or engagement with. These include but are not limited to: social and support groups, sporting communities, interest groups, charities, fan clubs and cultures, traditional cultural practices, volunteer projects, collectives, or other social networks. This focus extends to engagement with media and performance production, archival and curatorial cultures, in addition to social service providers and policy makers. Students actively investigate ‘real world’ situations and problems, evaluating cultural experience beyond the university. Activities in the course include: testing theoretical debates and methods against community standards and policies; debating key issues with reference to cultural productions and performances; and developing innovative ways of applying methodologies with a view to potential actions, humanitarian interventions.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Apply cultural studies research questions and methods to chosen contexts, including cultural representations, policies and relevant texts of associated community groups, organisation and work settings
  2. Choose and identify key problems or issues within a field, research the chosen field and gather relevant information and propose strategies for creative solutions using culturally appropriate methods of communication suited to that context
  3. Reflect critically on their own experiences and use those experiences as a source of information for further cultural studies research
  4. Create a plan to assist in developing, in negotiation with relevant communities, ethical community and cultural standards within the contexts of specific locations and practices, including the application of theoretical frameworks to dynamic environments
  5. Deploy advocacy skills informed by social justice values that enable them ethically to address questions of cultural diversity within real world contexts

General Assessment Information

Late Submissions - Guidelines

Tasks 10% or less. No extensions will be granted. Students who have not submitted the task prior to the deadline will be awarded a mark of 0 for the task, except for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

Tasks above 10%. No extensions will be granted. Students who submit late work without an approved Disruption to Studies extension will receive a penalty of 10% per day. This penalty does not apply for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Workshops/ online submissions 10% ongoing
Lit/ Representation Survey 20% Week 5
On-Site Research 20% Weeks 7 and 10 (interview)
Cultural Focus 20% Week 9
Final Presentation/ Report 30% Week 12

Workshops/ online submissions

Due: ongoing
Weighting: 10%

Outline, Criteria and Submission

1.You must attend and participate in seminars and workshops (with convenor). You will be required to take a leadership role in the seminars and present work based on the questions and activities to the rest of the group.

2. You will be required to complete interactive exercises from professional development staff with respect to ethics, goals and post-University career development.

3. You will question and share some of your experiences of your research via the Discussion link on the iLearn site, and respond to the postings of your colleagues with comments or suggestions.

4. You will present the progress of your research, and the direction in which you see your placement/ project taking, in addition to a final presentation in Week 12.

 

Marking Criteria:

- Active engagement in class discussion

- Demonstrated knowledge of the relevant topic(s)

- Demonstrated individual research of, and reflection on, topic

 

Submission:

Your participation mark is derived from your engagement in classes, completion of set exercises, responses to questions and online submissions. Missing classes and/ or submissions will reduce the maximum amount of marks which you can score. Off-campus reflective activities should be submitted online in the appropriate Discussion Forum topic and week.

Late Submissions - Guidelines

Tasks 10% or less. No extensions will be granted. Students who have not submitted the task prior to the deadline will be awarded a mark of 0 for the task, except for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Apply cultural studies research questions and methods to chosen contexts, including cultural representations, policies and relevant texts of associated community groups, organisation and work settings
  • Choose and identify key problems or issues within a field, research the chosen field and gather relevant information and propose strategies for creative solutions using culturally appropriate methods of communication suited to that context
  • Reflect critically on their own experiences and use those experiences as a source of information for further cultural studies research
  • Create a plan to assist in developing, in negotiation with relevant communities, ethical community and cultural standards within the contexts of specific locations and practices, including the application of theoretical frameworks to dynamic environments

Lit/ Representation Survey

Due: Week 5
Weighting: 20%

Outline, Criteria and Submission:

You must identify in your PACE placement a key activity/community/culture/creative practice or social problem/phenomenon to investigate and explore via a review of selected literature and media representations.

Your task in this assessment is to make yourself aware of the critical and theoretical research has been done with respect to this field/group, and key representations and technologies associated with it/ them. Construct a miniature literature review or make an annotated bibliography which will inform the types of issues you may want to observe first hand when you engage with that community, group or practice in the field, AND Collate a survey of representational material from available media images, policy documents, and other reportage to construct a ‘public picture’ of the cultural contexts and social actors involved.

Each section should be 500 words in length, 1000 words in total.

Marking Criteria:

- Demonstrated ability to synthesise you research, observations and experience

- Demonstrated ability to reflect critically on your own research process

- Demonstrated ability to begin to analyse the representations of particular practices, cultures and political contexts

 

Submission: via Turnitin link on CUL350 iLearn site

Late Submissions - Guidelines

Tasks above 10%. No extensions will be granted. Students who submit late work without an approved Disruption to Studies extension will receive a penalty of 10% per day. This penalty does not apply for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Apply cultural studies research questions and methods to chosen contexts, including cultural representations, policies and relevant texts of associated community groups, organisation and work settings
  • Choose and identify key problems or issues within a field, research the chosen field and gather relevant information and propose strategies for creative solutions using culturally appropriate methods of communication suited to that context
  • Reflect critically on their own experiences and use those experiences as a source of information for further cultural studies research
  • Create a plan to assist in developing, in negotiation with relevant communities, ethical community and cultural standards within the contexts of specific locations and practices, including the application of theoretical frameworks to dynamic environments

On-Site Research

Due: Weeks 7 and 10 (interview)
Weighting: 20%

Outline, Criteria and Submission:

There are two aspects to this assessment: a survey and an interview. During your placement you will design a brief survey on a culturally themed topic specific to your on-site context. The survey will include no more than ten 'yes/no', multiple choice, or short and answer questions. You will administer the survey to two people who work, or regularly participate in the workings of your placement environment. You will then submit the final, completed surveys online. After this, you will choose one of the respondents for a follow up interview based on their answers. In order to gain further information, you will develop five specific questions and interview them for ten minutes. You should transcribe the interview (from your notes or recording) and upload the transcript to the link in week 10. Both your surveys and interview should be referred to in both your final presentation and your final report.

Criteria for Marking

- Evidence of independent research

- Demonstrated ability to design a series of context appropriate questions and summarise responses

- Demonstrated ability to reflect critically on your own research process and develop further questions

- Demonstrated ability to analyse the practices, cultures and political context within a particular field

- Clarity of expression in line with expected academic standards

 

Submission: Via the Turtnitin link on the CUL 350 iLearn site; Initial surveys and interviews conduction on-site within PACE ethics provisions.

Late Submissions - Guidelines

Late Submissions - Guidelines

Tasks 10% or less. Whilst the combined weight of off-site activity is 20%, each item is work 10%. No extensions will be granted. Students who have not submitted the task prior to the deadline will be awarded a mark of 0 for the task, except for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Apply cultural studies research questions and methods to chosen contexts, including cultural representations, policies and relevant texts of associated community groups, organisation and work settings
  • Choose and identify key problems or issues within a field, research the chosen field and gather relevant information and propose strategies for creative solutions using culturally appropriate methods of communication suited to that context
  • Deploy advocacy skills informed by social justice values that enable them ethically to address questions of cultural diversity within real world contexts

Cultural Focus

Due: Week 9
Weighting: 20%

Outline, Criteria and Submission:

For this PACE unit you actively participate in and observe your chosen cultural context - be it a professional, social, creative activity or community context in practice for a period of at least 30 hours over the semester. As stated earlier, this may refer to political, social, legal, scientific or activist settings, fan based cultures, community meetings, marginalised or socially disadvantaged cultures, other topical social phenomena, media, creative, production or performance contexts.

 

Make observational notes and write up a 1000 word report about what you observed as a piece of ethnography. In observing, consider how the setting is structured, and identify how members of the community/cultural group are recognised and/or recruited. How do they engage with each other, and what are the aims of interactions? Is the group political or issues based? How are roles performed within the group or activity? What can you note in terms of spatial politics and poetics? How are issues of work, ethics and identity dealt with? How do the lived experiences of those you have encountered and observed compare with the mediated and/or policy-­‐based representations of them?

 

Marking Criteria:

- Evidence of independent research

- Demonstrated ability to synthesise you research, observations and experience within the context of academic arguments

- Demonstrated ability to reflect critically on your own research process

- Demonstrated ability to analyse the practices, cultures and political context within a particular field

- Clarity of expression in line with expected academic standards

 

Submission: Via the Turtnitin link on the CUL 350 iLearn site

Late Submissions - Guidelines

Tasks above 10%. No extensions will be granted. Students who submit late work without an approved Disruption to Studies extension will receive a penalty of 10% per day. This penalty does not apply for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Apply cultural studies research questions and methods to chosen contexts, including cultural representations, policies and relevant texts of associated community groups, organisation and work settings
  • Choose and identify key problems or issues within a field, research the chosen field and gather relevant information and propose strategies for creative solutions using culturally appropriate methods of communication suited to that context
  • Reflect critically on their own experiences and use those experiences as a source of information for further cultural studies research
  • Create a plan to assist in developing, in negotiation with relevant communities, ethical community and cultural standards within the contexts of specific locations and practices, including the application of theoretical frameworks to dynamic environments
  • Deploy advocacy skills informed by social justice values that enable them ethically to address questions of cultural diversity within real world contexts

Final Presentation/ Report

Due: Week 12
Weighting: 30%

Outline, Criteria and Submission:

Your task here is to draw together the findings of your first and second assignments, building on feedback and further analysis/evidence, with your experience of the placement. You will problematise, analyse and advocate ethical change in your observed culture, community or activity as appropriate.

There are two parts of this exercise: Firstly you will present your project in its entirety to the group. You may present your material as creatively or formally as you find appropriate. Start with your initial aims, take the group through your process, and accentuate the key points of interest/ characteristics of the cultural practices at play in the setting you have explored. On the basis of your research and experience, offer some solutions or propositions to help produce ethical and/ or socially inclusive outcomes for the group, or for some of the issues at hand. You will also chart some the ways you prceive this experience will inform or shape your life beyond your degree and outside of the university.

Secondly, you will submit  a 1000 word report that summarises your final position – or ‘project outcomes’ that you illustrated in your presentation. Here, you need to place the critical and theoretical material in relation to field notes and representations in order to create a final research statement that not only reflects your experiences, but suggests/acknowledges where further action could be taken in research, policy, creativity or social practice.

Criteria for marking:

- Demonstrated ability to synthesise you research, observations and experience within the context of academic arguments

- Demonstrated ability to reflect critically on your own research process

- Clarity of expression in line with expected academic standards

- Evidence of plans/ideas that aim to develop ethical community and cultural standards within the contexts of specific locations and practices, including the application of theoretical frameworks to dynamic environments

Submission:

Presentation is done during the workshop in week 12; The final report is submitted online via the CUL350 iLearn Turnitin link.

Late Submissions - Guidelines

Tasks above 10%. No extensions will be granted. Students who submit late work without an approved Disruption to Studies extension will receive a penalty of 10% per day. This penalty does not apply for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Deploy advocacy skills informed by social justice values that enable them ethically to address questions of cultural diversity within real world contexts

Delivery and Resources

Dr Anthony Lambert is convenor for CUL350  Email: anthony.lambert@mq.edu.au

Placement: CUL350 is a PACE unit that requires 30-60hrs of off-campus activity. For help with placements or PACE related resources, visit the Facult PACE site and contact the PACE team at: http://www.arts.mq.edu.au/current_students/undergraduate/pace

The university PACE site can be found at: http://students.mq.edu.au/courses/professional_and_community_engagement/

Classes: There will be 4 group seminars beginning in Week 2.

SEMINARS:     Mondays 10 am -12 pm, W5C311 (Weeks 2, 5, 9, 12)  

ONLINE ACTIVITY: You will also be expected to contribute to seminar and online discussions, and to regularly visit and post to the unit’s iLearn site.The site will give you another way of staying in touch, so you don’t feel isolated in your research or fieldwork process.  Sharing experiences via iLearn will give you an opportunity to try out ideas for your survey, brief and final assessment.

Reader: The CUL350 unit readings are accessed via the library's multisearch system - you should have the first two weeks done prior to Week 2. You will be expected to prepare for meetings by reading as well as thinking about your own experiences in your placement/ observation context. The readings are essential preparation for your seminar activities, your assignments and your research practice/documentation. ​The set readings are as follows:

Week One:         No Readings (finalise materials and placement with convenor)       

Week Two:         Culture and Community/ On-Campus Workshop I (Induction and Aims)        

Reading:              Saukko, P. (2005) Doing Research in Cultural Studies, London and Thousand oaks: SAGE Publications, pp. 176-­‐197.

Week Three       Culture and Work           

Reading:              Reidy, Joanne M. (2006) ‘Learners in unfamiliar workplaces’, in Learning to Work: Students experiences during work placements, Carlton: Melbourne University Press, pp. 19-­‐64.

Week Four         Culture, Policy and Power          

Reading:              Althaus, Catherine, Peter Bridgeman and Glyn Davis (2007) The Australian Policy Handbook 4th  Edn, Crows Nest: Allen & Unwin, pp. 32-­‐42 and 57-­‐85.

Week Five          Culture and Research/ On-Campus Seminar II (Reviewing the Context Due)

Reading:              Turner, Graeme (2012) ‘The Undiscipline: Cultural Studies and Interdisciplinarity’, What’s Become of Cultural Studies?, London: SAGE, pp. 40-‐69.

Week Six            Culture and Experience               

Reading:              Saukko, P. (2005) Doing Research in Cultural Studies, London and  Thousand Oaks: SAGE, pp.74-95.

Week Seven      Culture and Context  (Survey Task Due)

Reading:              Maton, K. (2009) ‘Habitus’ in Grenfell, M. (ed,) Bourdieu: Key Concepts, Stocksville: Acumen, pp.46-54.

Week Eight        No Readings

Week Nine         On-Campus Workshop III (Cultural Focus Due)

Reading:              Handy, f. (et al) (2010) ‘A Cross‐Cultural Examination of Student Volunteering: Is It All About Résumé Building?’,Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 39, pp. 498‐523.

Week 10              Culture, Meaning and Action  (Interview Task Due)   

Reading:              Urpo Kovala, (2002) “Cultural Studies and Cultural Text Analysis”, Comparative  Literature and Culture 4:4 (2002): <http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/clcweb/vol4/iss4/2>

Week 11            Culture and the Future

Reading:              Turner, G. (2012) ‘Does Cultural Studies have a Future?’, What’s Become of Cultural Studies?, London: SAGE, pp. 155-­‐ 179.

Week 12            On-Campus Workshop IV (Debriefing and Conclusions; Final Report Due)        

                           In class Presentations and Exit Interviews.

Week 13            No Readings

Unit Schedule

Week One:         Culture and Preparation               (Pre- class questionnaire due)

Week Two:         Culture and Community/ On-Campus Workshop I (Induction and Aims)                                                                    

Week Three:       Culture and Work           

Week Four:         Culture, Policy and Power          

Week Five:          Culture and Research/ On-Campus Workshop II (Reviewing the Contex​t DUE)

Week Six:            Culture and Experience               

Week Seven:      Culture and Context  (Survey Task Due)

Week Eight:        Reading Week 

Week Nine:         Cultural Studies in Communities/ On-Campus Seminar III (Cultural Focus DUE)

Week Ten:           Culture, Meaning and Action  (Interview Task Due)   

Week Eleven:      Culture and the Future

Week Twelve:      Culture, Problems, Possibilities and Pathways/ On-Campus Workshop IV (Debriefing and Conclusions) REPORT DUE        

Week Thirteen:    Consultations as required

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Late Submissions - Guidelines

Tasks 10% or less. No extensions will be granted. Students who have not submitted the task prior to the deadline will be awarded a mark of 0 for the task, except for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

Tasks above 10%. No extensions will be granted. Students who submit late work without an approved Disruption to Studies extension will receive a penalty of 10% per day. This penalty does not apply for cases in which an application for Disruption to Studies is made and approved.

Additional information

MMCCS website https://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/faculties_and_departments/faculty_of_arts/department_of_media_music_communication_and_cultural_studies/

MMCCS Session Re-mark Application http://www.mq.edu.au/pubstatic/public/download/?id=167914

Information is correct at the time of publication

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Choose and identify key problems or issues within a field, research the chosen field and gather relevant information and propose strategies for creative solutions using culturally appropriate methods of communication suited to that context
  • Create a plan to assist in developing, in negotiation with relevant communities, ethical community and cultural standards within the contexts of specific locations and practices, including the application of theoretical frameworks to dynamic environments

Assessment tasks

  • Workshops/ online submissions
  • Lit/ Representation Survey
  • On-Site Research
  • Cultural Focus

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Apply cultural studies research questions and methods to chosen contexts, including cultural representations, policies and relevant texts of associated community groups, organisation and work settings
  • Choose and identify key problems or issues within a field, research the chosen field and gather relevant information and propose strategies for creative solutions using culturally appropriate methods of communication suited to that context
  • Reflect critically on their own experiences and use those experiences as a source of information for further cultural studies research
  • Create a plan to assist in developing, in negotiation with relevant communities, ethical community and cultural standards within the contexts of specific locations and practices, including the application of theoretical frameworks to dynamic environments

Assessment tasks

  • Workshops/ online submissions
  • Lit/ Representation Survey
  • On-Site Research
  • Cultural Focus

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Apply cultural studies research questions and methods to chosen contexts, including cultural representations, policies and relevant texts of associated community groups, organisation and work settings
  • Choose and identify key problems or issues within a field, research the chosen field and gather relevant information and propose strategies for creative solutions using culturally appropriate methods of communication suited to that context
  • Reflect critically on their own experiences and use those experiences as a source of information for further cultural studies research
  • Create a plan to assist in developing, in negotiation with relevant communities, ethical community and cultural standards within the contexts of specific locations and practices, including the application of theoretical frameworks to dynamic environments
  • Deploy advocacy skills informed by social justice values that enable them ethically to address questions of cultural diversity within real world contexts

Assessment tasks

  • Workshops/ online submissions
  • Lit/ Representation Survey
  • On-Site Research
  • Cultural Focus
  • Final Presentation/ Report

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Create a plan to assist in developing, in negotiation with relevant communities, ethical community and cultural standards within the contexts of specific locations and practices, including the application of theoretical frameworks to dynamic environments

Assessment tasks

  • Workshops/ online submissions
  • Lit/ Representation Survey
  • Cultural Focus

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Reflect critically on their own experiences and use those experiences as a source of information for further cultural studies research
  • Create a plan to assist in developing, in negotiation with relevant communities, ethical community and cultural standards within the contexts of specific locations and practices, including the application of theoretical frameworks to dynamic environments
  • Deploy advocacy skills informed by social justice values that enable them ethically to address questions of cultural diversity within real world contexts

Assessment tasks

  • Workshops/ online submissions
  • Lit/ Representation Survey
  • On-Site Research
  • Cultural Focus
  • Final Presentation/ Report

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Deploy advocacy skills informed by social justice values that enable them ethically to address questions of cultural diversity within real world contexts

Assessment tasks

  • On-Site Research
  • Cultural Focus
  • Final Presentation/ Report

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Apply cultural studies research questions and methods to chosen contexts, including cultural representations, policies and relevant texts of associated community groups, organisation and work settings
  • Deploy advocacy skills informed by social justice values that enable them ethically to address questions of cultural diversity within real world contexts

Assessment tasks

  • Workshops/ online submissions
  • Lit/ Representation Survey
  • On-Site Research
  • Cultural Focus
  • Final Presentation/ Report

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Deploy advocacy skills informed by social justice values that enable them ethically to address questions of cultural diversity within real world contexts

Assessment tasks

  • On-Site Research
  • Cultural Focus
  • Final Presentation/ Report

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Deploy advocacy skills informed by social justice values that enable them ethically to address questions of cultural diversity within real world contexts

Assessment tasks

  • On-Site Research
  • Cultural Focus
  • Final Presentation/ Report

Changes from Previous Offering

The unit has been significantly revised in order to facilitate context based cultural research; the unit has been modified in accordance with PACE requirements.