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ICOM815 – Global Power and Justice

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Sabine Krajewski
Contact via sabine.krajewski@mq.edu.au
Y3A 165H
Wed after 1pm. Please email to confirm a consulation time.
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MIntComm or MIntRel or MIntCommMIntRel or MPPP or MIntBusMIntComm or GradDipIntRel
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit looks at how power is exercised and communicated in different cultures and in different ways; legitimacy is a core concept to the study of power. We examine approaches to power in traditional Europe, China, India and Islam, as well as how language and the media can be used to exercise power. A range of modern theories of power are discussed. While there is a strong theoretical aspect to the unit, ultimately it is practical because anyone working internationally must understand power in all its manifestations. Teaching is interactive and students are encouraged to talk about their culture's approach to power and legitimacy.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Appraise communication and power theories in discussions and current and past written accounts
  2. Develop a clear understanding and contrast different concepts of power
  3. Analyse and evaluate how power is used and how to use it
  4. Apply power theory and communication techniques to international current affairs

General Assessment Information

Please note: There will be a link on ilearn to upload each of your essays. The short essay needs to be uploaded in week 4, date and time as indicated in the due dates document available on ilearn. The extended essay is due in week 10 and needs to be uploaded to turnitin (link on ilearn) as well as handed in as hard copy with signed cover sheet to the appropriate box in Y3A (see exact location on ilearn). Extensions due to serious disruption of study are only available per online academic request.

Late assessments will be penalized 10% per day. In cases of illness and misadventure students must submit official documentation and apply online for Disruptions to Studies.

 

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Mini Essay 15% Week 4
Presentation 20% Week 8/9
Written assignment 25% Week 10
Class Participation 10% ongoing
Test 30% Week 12

Mini Essay

Due: Week 4
Weighting: 15%

Write a short essay of 500 words about one of the topics shown on ilearn. Do use in-text citations and attach references.

 

 

Marking Criteria Essay ICOM 815

Criteria

HD

Distinction

Credit

Pass

Fail

Writing style

Excellent structure, appropriate register, coherent argumentation throughout

Good structure with intro and conclusion Well written, convincing essay

appropriate register and coherent argumentation

Use of paragraphs, well organised text

appropriate register

Use of paragraphs

Some organisation of text

 

Unstructured or bullet points

Argument

Clearly outlined argument that is followed throughout essay, supported by evidence marked by in-text citations

Clear argument that is tested from several angles

Well developed argument

Some attempt to identify author’s argument

No recognisable argument

Content

Comprehensive answer to essay question supported by suitable examples. Clear and accurate definitions and ref. to scholars.

Comprehensive answer to essay question supported by examples. Good definitions and ref. to scholars.

Answers essay question and gives good example(s)

Answers essay question and shows understanding of topic

Not relevant to topic; incoherent or only partly answering the question

Language

Persuasive essay, correct spelling and grammar

Well argued, correct spelling and grammar

Well argued, largely correct spelling and grammar

Language errors but text can be understood.

Difficult to understand content

References

Correct referencing throughout text, and in reference list; excellent choice of sources

Correct referencing throughout text, consistent reference list, good choice of sources

Largely correct referencing (in text citations and references)

Attempt to reference though not always correct/consistent

Not referenced

 

 

 

Note: The same essay writing rules (and marking criteria) apply to the short and the extended essays. Make sure your essay is clearly structured (introduction, body, and conclusion) and answer your essay question. Go beyond your reader, there are books in the library. You need fewer references for the short essay, three or four relevant ones may be enough. Use in-text citations to support your argument.

If you are an international student, don’t worry too much about language errors, but do make sure that the essay is easy to read and understand (ask another student to read it before handing it in, but do not have your text ‘polished’ by anyone, use your own words.

Good luck with it!

 

Late penalty:

Late assessments will be penalized 10% per day. In cases of illness and misadventure students must submit official documentation and apply online for Disruptions to Studies.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Develop a clear understanding and contrast different concepts of power

Presentation

Due: Week 8/9
Weighting: 20%

This is a 10 minute summary presentation to the class of the main features of your essay. Keep it short and punchy. Do not read your slides (I can read). The most common mistakes here are too much detail, reading instead of presenting and lack of life in the presentation style. You will be assessed on how interesting you make the presentation and the structure of your argument; you will lose marks for excessive length.

 

 

Presentations 815

Criterion

HD

D

Cr

P

F

Presentation skills

An excellent presentation reveals enough information to involve the audience in a fruitful discussion, but leaves enough space for them to make their own enquiries into the topic. The speaker is entertaining and engaging; ppt is short and to the point; the presenter elaborates on the presented material and involves the audience in critical thinking

A very good presentation is entertaining and engaging; ppt gives relevant information, but the presenter elaborates on the presented material and involves the audience in critical thinking

A good presentation is lively and uses the ppt as support rather than relying on its content. It presents details and gives enough thought for discussion

A pass mark will be given if the presentation shows the interest of the presenter in the topic, a reasonable number of supporting slides or other materials

Slides are read rather than explained, information is incoherent, speaker does not seem to be prepared to present in an engaging way

content

Focus is on  an aspect of power and or legitimacy not yet covered in class; defined topic is briefly introduced, a well developed argument and a preliminary list of references illustrate the speaker’s direction

Presentation is focussing on an aspect of power and or legitimacy; covers a defined topic and covers enough background info to leave room for a well developed argument

Topic relates to power issue and is well defined, presentation covers too much or too little background information

Topic relates to a power issue, but is either too narrow or too broad to be covered in the presentation

Presentation does not relate to power or legitimacy

argument

A well rounded, viable argument, prepared to deal with counter arguments; clear line of argumentation using content/scholars studied

A well rounded argument, aligned with content/material studied, prepared to deal with counter arguments

A viable argument but needs to be better linked to content/material studied

Argument is not well developed, topic is seen from one angle only/too narrow

No real argument

 

 

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Develop a clear understanding and contrast different concepts of power
  • Analyse and evaluate how power is used and how to use it
  • Apply power theory and communication techniques to international current affairs

Written assignment

Due: Week 10
Weighting: 25%

Description: Essays can be on any topic relevant to the course and should be referenced using the Harvard style. Please consult me on your topic if you wish.I am looking for a well organised, logical argument leading to some kind of substantive conclusion. Examine some aspect of power and/or legitimacy. You may wish to take a case study and discuss what that tells us about theory or you may prefer to compare two or more different approaches to the same aspect of power.  What is important is your critical analysis of a relevant topic.

You do not need to have a separate literature review section unless you want to; you can include relevant readings at the appropriate place in the body of your text if you prefer. Assignments need to be submitted as hard copies to Y3A and also via turnitin. There is a link on ilearn to submit your work to turnitin.

You will be assessed on how you set out and present your arguments, the quality of your arguments, originality of your own thought and on how you use sources.The most common mistakes students make are: poor structure; a very general conclusion that does not follow from the argument; poor referencing; too much description; topic not directly relevant to the course and not enough analysis.

 

Marking Criteria Essay ICOM 815

Criteria

HD

D

Credit

Pass

Fail

Writing style

Excellent structure, appropriate register, coherent argumentation throughout

Good structure with intro and conclusion Well written, convincing essay

appropriate register and coherent argumentation

Use of paragraphs, well organised text

appropriate register

Use of paragraphs

Some organisation of text

 

Unstructured or bullet points

Argument

Clearly outlined argument that is followed throughout essay, supported by evidence marked by in-text citations

Clear argument that is tested from several angles

Well developed argument

Some attempt to identify author’s argument

No recognisable argument

Content

Comprehensive answer to essay question supported by suitable examples. Clear and accurate definitions and ref. to scholars.

Comprehensive answer to essay question supported by examples. Good definitions and ref. to scholars.

Answers essay question and gives good example(s)

Answers essay question and shows understanding of topic

Not relevant to topic; incoherent or only partly answering the question

Language

Persuasive essay, correct spelling and grammar

Well argued, correct spelling and grammar

Well argued, largely correct spelling and grammar

Language errors but text can be understood.

Difficult to understand content

References

Correct referencing throughout text, and in reference list; excellent choice of sources

Correct referencing throughout text, consistent reference list, good choice of sources

Largely correct referencing (in text citations and references)

Attempt to reference though not always correct/consistent

Not referenced

 

 

 

Note: The same essay writing rules (and marking criteria) apply to the short and the extended essays. Make sure your essay is clearly structured (introduction, body, and conclusion) and answer your essay question. Go beyond your reader, there are books in the library. You need fewer references for the short essay, three or four relevant ones may be enough. Use in-text citations to support your argument.

If you are an international student, don’t worry too much about language errors, but do make sure that the essay is easy to read and understand (ask another student to read it before handing it in, but do not have your text ‘polished’ by anyone, use your own words.

Good luck with it!

 

Late penalty:

Late assessments will be penalized 10% per day. In cases of illness and misadventure students must submit official documentation and apply online for Disruptions to Studies.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Appraise communication and power theories in discussions and current and past written accounts
  • Develop a clear understanding and contrast different concepts of power
  • Analyse and evaluate how power is used and how to use it

Class Participation

Due: ongoing
Weighting: 10%

Students are expected to participate in class discussions (which assume a knowledge of the readings) and to attend and be punctual for at least 75% of the sessions. Those who participate actively and sensibly will get the full 10%; those who miss discussion sessions or stay silent will get a low mark.

 

Criteria: to achieve full marks students need to regularly attend lectures and tutorials (80% each), complete essential readings for each week as outlined in the reader and add to group discussions during tutorials. Informed comments/questions are more important than the quantity of comments made in class.

Marking criteria participation

HD

D

Cr

P

F

>80% attendance

always punctual

>80% attendance

always punctual

>75% attendance

Almost always punctual

>75% attendance,

mostly punctual

poor attendance

regular participation and

significant contribution during tutes

displays interest in other people’s contributions and gives useful feedback in presentation sessions

has done most or all readings before class

regular participation and

significant contribution during tutes

has done most or all readings before class

regular participation

has done most readings before class

some participation,

has done some of the readings before class

no participation

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Appraise communication and power theories in discussions and current and past written accounts
  • Develop a clear understanding and contrast different concepts of power
  • Analyse and evaluate how power is used and how to use it
  • Apply power theory and communication techniques to international current affairs

Test

Due: Week 12
Weighting: 30%

This will require short answers to questions on some basic concepts covered during the course. You will have to answer any three out of six questions in one hour. If you have followed the basic ideas in the course, you should have no difficulty with it. I mark it for content, not for elegance of expression. You can use dot points if you wish. You will be assessed on whether or not you have understood the basic concepts involved in each question.

 

 

Marking criteria test ICOM815

 

 

D/HD

Cr

P

F

Answer 3 of the 6 questions

3 questions have been answered

Answer reflects at least 75% (or, respectively, 85%) of information directly relevant to each question and is correct

An average of 75%/85% across the 3 answers is relevant and correct

3 questions have been answered

Answer reflects at least 65% of information directly relevant to each question and is correct

or

An average of 65% across the 3 answers is relevant and correct

Attempt to answer 3 questions

Answer reflects at least 50% of information directly relevant to each question and is correct

Fewer than 3 questions answered

Less than 50% of each answer directly refers to question and/or is incorrect

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Appraise communication and power theories in discussions and current and past written accounts
  • Develop a clear understanding and contrast different concepts of power

Delivery and Resources

Lectorial

ICOM815/S2  Wednesday 9:00am 11:00am  

W5C210

i  
               
ICOM815/S2    Wednesday 11am-     1pm        W5C210                

Teaching and Learning Strategy

You need to attend at least 80% of the lectorials. An introduction to each week's topic and ppts for that session will be on ilearn, please have a look before coming to class and note any questions you might have. Make sure to read the prescribed texts in your reader before attending the sessions. Make yourself comfortable - if you have any questions or suggestions, put them on ilearn or talk to your lecturer.

Information

Make sure to log on to ilearn at least once a week. You will find current information, assignment deadlines, reading suggestions, a link to turnitin and much more.

Students are expected to prepare for each class by:

looking at the ppt that will be uploaded before each session

reading prescribed texts

...and preparing at least one question or comment on the topic that will be examined each week.

The weeks for presentations will be chosen together with participants of the unit. Depending on group size and suitability, presentations will be held after week 8.

Other material

Please read the prescribed texts in the course reader each week before attending the tutorials. Make sure to check ilearn for additional material and use additional sources for assignments.

Unit Schedule

 

Week 1

 

Introduction to the notion of power

 

Week 2

 

Legitimacy

 

Week 3

 

The Western Tradition (1)

 

Week 4

 

The West (2)

 

Week 5

 

The Chinese Tradition

 

Week 6

 

The Indian Tradition

Week 7

Islam

 

Week 8

 

Presentations 

Week 9

 

Presentations

 

Week 10

 

 Language as power

 

Week 11

 

 Power and Violence

 

Week 12

Test (1 hour) and power game

 

Week 13

Summary and Review of course.

 

 

REQUIRED READING

Readings in class reader should be read before each class. They must be bought from the Co-Op.

 

RECOMMENDED READING

This list contains references to the readings in your readers plus some other suggested books or articles. You do not have to read every book on this list; some are just to help you follow up a topic for interest or for your assignment. You are encouraged to read further through the Library and the net.

 

Aggarwala, N. K. (1990). A Third World perspective on the news. In L. J. Martin and R. E. Hiebert (Eds.), Current Issues in International Communications. New York: Longman.

Ali, Tariq 2002 Letter to a Young Muslim in Tariq Ali, The Clash of Fundamentalisms, Verso London

Anderson, Benedict (1991). Imagined Communities. New York: Verso.

Ang, Ien (1990). Culture and communication: towards an ethnographic critique of media consumption in the transnational media system. European Journal of Communication, 5(2-3): 239-260.

Appadurai, Arjun (1997). Modernity at Large: The Cultural Dimensions of Globalization. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

Elias, Nobert (1988). Violence and civilization: The state monopoly of physical violence and its infringement. In John Keane (Ed.). Civil Society and the State: New European Perspectives. London: Verso.

Foucault, Michel (1977). Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. New York: Vintage Books.

Hallin, Daniel C. (1994). We Keep America on Top of the World. London & New York: Routledge.

Hartley, John (2004) Power from Communication, Cultural & Media Studies – the Key Concepts, Routledge, London

Herman, Edward and Noam Chomsky (1988). Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media. New York: Pantheon Books.

Hindess, Barry (1996). Discourses of Power: From Hobbes to Foucault. Oxford & Cambridge: Blackwell Publishers.

Im, Young-ho (1998). The media, civil society and new social movements in Korea, 1985-93. In Kuan-Hsing Chen etal. (Eds.), Trajectories: Inter-Asia Cultural Studies. London and New York: Routledge.

Kaldor, Mary (1998). Reconceptualizing organized violence. In Daniele Archibugi, David Held and Martin Kohler (Eds.). Re-imagining Political Community: Studies in Cosmopolitan Democracy. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press.

Kang Myung Koo (1998). The grassroots online movement and changes of Korean civil society. Review of Media, Information and Society 3: 109-128. The Institute of Socio-Information and Communication Studies, The University of Tokyo.

Kang, Myung Koo (1998). A reconsideration of cultural imperialism theories: globalization and nationalism. Presented to the Inter-Asia Cultural Studies Conference "Problematising Asia", National Tsing-Hua University. Taiwan, July 12-17.

Keane, John (1996). Reflections on Violence. London & New York: Verso.

Keane, John (2001). Global civil society? Mimeo.

Kim, Shin Dong (1997). The coup d'etat model: Public broadcasting under control. Mimeo.

Li Zhi Sui (1994) The Private Life of Chairman Mao, various editions in English and Chinese.

Lukes, Steven (1974). Power: A Radical View. London: Macmillan.

Lukes, Steven (Ed.) (1986). Power. New York: New York University Press.

Mann, Michael (1988). States, War and Capitalism. Basil Blackwell.

Martin-Barbero, Jesus (1993). Communication, Culture and Hegemony: From the Media to Mediations. London & Newbury Park: Sage.

H.L.Mencken (1926/2009) Notes on Democracy Dissident Books, New York

Mowlana, Hamid, George Gerbner, and Herbert I. Schiller (1992). Triumph of the Image. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

Nasr, Vali (2006) The Shia Revival, W.W.Norton New York & London

Saul, John Ralston 2005 The Collapse of Globalism and the Reinvention of the World, Viking, Australia pp 3-35

Smith, Anthony D. (1990). Towards a Global Culture? In Mike Featherstone (Ed.) Global Culture: Nationalism, Globalization and Modernity. London & Newbury Park: Sage.

Turpin, Jennifer and Kurtz, Lester R. (Ed.) (1997). The Web of Violence: From International to Global. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press.

Weatherall, Ann 2002 Gender, Language and Discourse, Routledge, UK pp1-9; 64-80. This book puts feminist view of sexism in language.

Williams, Paul L. 2002 Jihad Ch.9 in Paul L.Williams, Al Qaeda; Brotherhood of Terror, Alpha USA

 

Web:

The following sites may be useful:

 

When Language Means Power: A Sociolinguistic Study of Bill Clinton's Between Hope and History: Meeting America's Challenges for the 21st Century

 

... reflects power structures – language has an impact on power structures. Language can be seen as an indicator of social and therefore political situations – and language can also be seen as a driving force directed at changing politics and society. Language is an in-put as ... 

Language and Violence: Analysis of Four Discursive Operations

L Coates… - Journal of Family Violence, 2007 – Springer Page 1.

 

The strategic use of language is indispensable to the acquisition and exercise of power, even power that is acquired democratically (Fairclough 1989; Foucault 1980). ... 

Authoritarianism and Legitimacy: Mobilizing Islam in the Middle East

The publication of the Mohammed caricatures in Denmark and other European countries and the ensuing violent protests in several Muslim countries have engendered a debate about the balance between freedom of speech and the need to avoid offending religious ...

Making Islam democratic: social movements and the post-Islamist turn

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Additional information

MMCCS website https://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/faculties_and_departments/faculty_of_arts/department_of_media_music_communication_and_cultural_studies/

MMCCS Session Re-mark Application http://www.mq.edu.au/pubstatic/public/download/?id=167914

Information is correct at the time of publication

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Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

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Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

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Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

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Graduate Capabilities

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop a clear understanding and contrast different concepts of power
  • Analyse and evaluate how power is used and how to use it
  • Apply power theory and communication techniques to international current affairs

Assessment task

  • Written assignment

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Appraise communication and power theories in discussions and current and past written accounts
  • Develop a clear understanding and contrast different concepts of power
  • Apply power theory and communication techniques to international current affairs

Assessment tasks

  • Mini Essay
  • Presentation
  • Written assignment
  • Test

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Develop a clear understanding and contrast different concepts of power
  • Analyse and evaluate how power is used and how to use it

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation
  • Written assignment
  • Class Participation

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Analyse and evaluate how power is used and how to use it

Assessment tasks

  • Mini Essay
  • Presentation
  • Written assignment

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Appraise communication and power theories in discussions and current and past written accounts

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation
  • Class Participation

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Apply power theory and communication techniques to international current affairs

Assessment tasks

  • Presentation
  • Class Participation

Changes from Previous Offering

The reader will be a slimmer version because many students struggled with the volume of text. The texts left in the reader are essential and must be read before attending each week, additional sources may be useful. Powerpoints will be released before we meet in class so that it is easier to prepare and bring in questions. Many of our topics include current political developments, therefore slides for each week will only be available on the weekend before we meet.