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ANTH702 – Core Issues in Anthropological Theory II

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Jaap Timmer
Contact via jaap.timmer@mq.edu.au
AHH
TBA
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MRes
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit is the second of two core anthropology units that provide a grounding in theoretical, methodological and interpretive issues that are currently being debated by anthropologists. These courses form the core of the anthropology specialisation for the MRes. The issues covered will vary from year to year according to contemporary developments in anthropology and the interests of the course convenor. Others may be more enduring, such as the theoretical issues related to kinship, to politics and power and the relation between individual and society, the “writing culture” debate, “Orientalism” and the problem of the “other,” and cultural relativism.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Gain an understanding of long-standing debates surrounding fieldwork, ethnography, anthropology and representation
  2. Familiarise themselves with anthropological perspectives on embodiment, the emotions and senses.
  3. Acquire insight into cutting edge anthropological concerns such as ontology and human-environment relations
  4. Enhance their communication and interpersonal skills through oral discussion and written work that focuses on conveying understanding, argument and information in a clear and concise fashion
  5. Cement critical analysis and creative thinking skills through research assignments.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Seminar participation 20% Weekly
Report on discussion 30% One week after discussion
Major essay 50% TBA

Seminar participation

Due: Weekly
Weighting: 20%

Seminar attendance and participation are mandatory. Active engagement in our discussions is vital: please come to class well prepared, willing to contribute your ideas, and ready to listen to others' contributions.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Gain an understanding of long-standing debates surrounding fieldwork, ethnography, anthropology and representation
  • Familiarise themselves with anthropological perspectives on embodiment, the emotions and senses.
  • Acquire insight into cutting edge anthropological concerns such as ontology and human-environment relations
  • Enhance their communication and interpersonal skills through oral discussion and written work that focuses on conveying understanding, argument and information in a clear and concise fashion

Report on discussion

Due: One week after discussion
Weighting: 30%

Students will be responsible for facilitating one seminar discussion over the course of the session. You should prepare for the discussion by: carefully reading the week's required and extended readings; identifying central arguments and areas of potential confusion; generating starting points for class discussion. You will assume responsibility for introducing and guiding a respectful, well-informed discussion of the weekly topic. Creativity is encouraged.

One week after the discussion you will submit a 1,000-1,200 word report on the weekly discussion topic. The report should incorporate your preparation for the discussion and any insights on the topic that came out of the discussion. Your final mark for this assessment task will incorporate both a mark for the facilitation and a mark for the written report.  


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Gain an understanding of long-standing debates surrounding fieldwork, ethnography, anthropology and representation
  • Familiarise themselves with anthropological perspectives on embodiment, the emotions and senses.
  • Acquire insight into cutting edge anthropological concerns such as ontology and human-environment relations
  • Enhance their communication and interpersonal skills through oral discussion and written work that focuses on conveying understanding, argument and information in a clear and concise fashion

Major essay

Due: TBA
Weighting: 50%

Students will submit a 3,000 word research essay devoted to one of the issues canvassed over the course of the session.  


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Cement critical analysis and creative thinking skills through research assignments.

Delivery and Resources

All required readings for this unit are available via iLearn. 

iLearn login is via: https://ilearn.mq.edu.au/ Students are required to have regular access to a computer and the internet. Mobile devices alone are not sufficient. For technical support go to: http://mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/informatics/help For student quick guides on the use of iLearn go to: http://mq.edu.au/iLearn/student_info/guides.htm

Unit Schedule

TBA

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Familiarise themselves with anthropological perspectives on embodiment, the emotions and senses.
  • Acquire insight into cutting edge anthropological concerns such as ontology and human-environment relations
  • Cement critical analysis and creative thinking skills through research assignments.

Assessment tasks

  • Report on discussion
  • Major essay

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Enhance their communication and interpersonal skills through oral discussion and written work that focuses on conveying understanding, argument and information in a clear and concise fashion
  • Cement critical analysis and creative thinking skills through research assignments.

Assessment tasks

  • Seminar participation
  • Report on discussion
  • Major essay

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Gain an understanding of long-standing debates surrounding fieldwork, ethnography, anthropology and representation
  • Familiarise themselves with anthropological perspectives on embodiment, the emotions and senses.
  • Acquire insight into cutting edge anthropological concerns such as ontology and human-environment relations
  • Cement critical analysis and creative thinking skills through research assignments.

Assessment task

  • Major essay

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Cement critical analysis and creative thinking skills through research assignments.

Assessment task

  • Major essay

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Gain an understanding of long-standing debates surrounding fieldwork, ethnography, anthropology and representation

Assessment tasks

  • Seminar participation
  • Report on discussion

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Gain an understanding of long-standing debates surrounding fieldwork, ethnography, anthropology and representation
  • Enhance their communication and interpersonal skills through oral discussion and written work that focuses on conveying understanding, argument and information in a clear and concise fashion

Assessment tasks

  • Seminar participation
  • Report on discussion