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ICOM892 – Public Diplomacy and International Public Relations

2017 – S1 External

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Convenor
Lauren Gorfinkel
Contact via lauren.gorfinkel@mq.edu.au
Y3A 165B
Tuesdays 1-2 (email for an appointment)
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MIntComm or MIntRel or MIntCommMIntRel or MIntBusMIntComm or MIntPubDip or GradDipIntRel
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
The unit provides theoretical frameworks and practical learning exercises for image analysis and construction by international actors – intergovernmental, state, corporate and non-government. The concepts of symbolic interactionism, soft power, public diplomacy, international public relations, framing, image and branding are examined from strategic and ethical communication perspectives. Theory is related to practice through analysis of existing international public relations campaigns and the design of new ones. Through weekly simulations of press conferences regarding current events, students develop practical skills in analysing strategic opportunities for presenting their organisation to publics.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Evaluate and analyse theories and debates about image, frames, public diplomacy and international public relations.
  2. Evaluate the relationship between hard and soft power, public diplomacy, and international public relations.
  3. Analyse public diplomacy / international public relations campaigns.
  4. Create and effectively communicate an original public diplomacy / international public relations campaign.
  5. Apply practical media research and interview skills to public diplomacy / international public relations contexts.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Frame Analysis 20% 5pm Friday March 17 (Week 3)
Critical Essay 30% 5pm, Thurs 13 April (Week 7)
Individual Presentation 20% Week 6 or 7
Critical Response Tasks 30% Weeks 1-7

Frame Analysis

Due: 5pm Friday March 17 (Week 3)
Weighting: 20%

Use framing analysis to analyse Country A's national image in media discourse in Country B or international media discourse. 

The objective of the assignment is to analyse and evaluate two main theories (image and framing), and apply an analytical tool (framing analysis) to analyse one country's national image in the media discourse of another country.

Specific requirements for this essay: 

1. Review the notions of national image and framing theory

2. Select 8-10 news articles about Country A from two mainstream media in Country B or from a global dominant media (e.g. BBC, CNN)

3. Apply framing analysis to analyse the selected news articles 

4. Discuss the findings or frames of Country A's image in the analysis 

Word limit: 1000 words (exclusive of references)

1. Sophisticated analysis and evaluation of key international public relations concepts (image and framing)

2. Correct application of the research method for the analysis of media discourse 

3. Sound interpretation of research findings 

4. Clear and well-organised essay structure, and consistent referencing including in-text citations 

5. Clear and concise writing skills


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Evaluate and analyse theories and debates about image, frames, public diplomacy and international public relations.
  • Apply practical media research and interview skills to public diplomacy / international public relations contexts.

Critical Essay

Due: 5pm, Thurs 13 April (Week 7)
Weighting: 30%

The objective of the assignment is to research, describe, analyse and evaluate a specific public diplomacy or international public relations campaign by a state, a non-government organisation or a large business operating internationally. This is essentially an exercise in analysis. You may consider questions such as: What was the campaign and what did the actor hope to achieve? What did it do and why? What were the obstacles and the advantages it had? Was it successful? Why or why not? Could it have been improved? How? 

The focus of the essay must have the following features:

* It must be an international campaign. i.e. the campaigner’s target audience should not be its own domestic audience. The audience should be outside the campaigning institution’s own national borders. Such audiences could include diasporic publics. The campaign must have been commissioned by a government, government agency, intergovernmental organisation, nongovernmental organisation or large business. It must be a specific campaign conducted for a specific purpose at a specific time. It must be a public relations or soft public diplomacy exercise, not a hard diplomacy or a 'behind closed doors' diplomatic one, the latter being more relevant to international relations.

* Relate what you say about this specific case to some of the theory that we have discussed in class. In other words, what wider lessons can we learn from this case study and/or how does theory illuminate your case study? Make sure that your conclusion sets out what you think your case study tells us about international public relations and/or public diplomacy in general: What can we learn from this case study? 

*Pay attention to structure, logical flow and conclusions which flow from what you have analysed. Use headings to help you create a solid structure. Make sure your conclusion follows from your argument. The most common mistakes students make are: poor structure; too much description and not enough analysis; the conclusion is too general and/or does not follow from the argument in the paper.

Word limit: 2,000 words (exclusive of references)

Assessment Criteria are:

1. Solid application of relevant research methods

2. Effective analysis and evaluation of an existing campaign in relation to relevant theoretical models

3. Rigorous argumentation and originality of campaign recommendations

4. Clear and concise writing style


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Evaluate and analyse theories and debates about image, frames, public diplomacy and international public relations.
  • Evaluate the relationship between hard and soft power, public diplomacy, and international public relations.
  • Analyse public diplomacy / international public relations campaigns.

Individual Presentation

Due: Week 6 or 7
Weighting: 20%

The objective of this assignment is to develop and present an original public diplomacy or international public relations campaign that addresses a real issue faced by an international client. The client may be an individual, corporation, non-government organisation, government or international governmental organisation for whom international image is important. This assessment differs from the critical essay in that now you are presenting your own campaign instead of crtitiquing and evaluating one already executed by an organisation. However. you may choose to create a campaign for the same organisation that you do your critical essay on.

The presentation is to be in the format of a persuasive sales pitch rather than an academic paper, but needs to be well researched. You will present your campaign proposal to your prospective client.

You must identify and describe who you are – that is your PR agency - as well as who your prospective client is. For instance, if Australia is experiencing an image problem in Indonesia, your prospective client may be the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

In your presentation you need to analyse the client’s image problem (based on solid research into a real problem) and the specific public or audience you wish to reach in the country where the image problem exists. Saying ‘people of Indonesia’ will not suffice - which people specifically will be targeted? Use Diffusion Theory to analyse the audience strategically and identify opinion leaders. 

Remember it must be an international campaign (e.g. an Australian campaign in Indonesia), not a domestic one (e.g.Australian campaign in Australia). Make sure it is a specific timebound public relations or public diplomacy campaign that is aimed at addressing a particular image or related problem.

The presentation should be 8-10 minutes long. It should be accompanied by no more than 8 powerpoint slides (including one with references).

You need to record your oral presentation and upload the recording on iLearn or send the recording to the unit convenor. The Powerpoint slides need to be submitted to Turnitin by 11.59pm on the day of your presentation.

You will be marked on your ability to:

1. Demonstrate appropriate and independent research into a real image problem for your organisation

2. Identify and describe key actors

3. Contextualise the actor's image problem

4. Apply Diffusion Theory to analyse the target audience and opinion leaders

5. Design an effective, original and convincing new campaign strategy

6. Provide effective PPT slides

7. Succinctly and persuasively deliver the campaign pitch within the given time


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Create and effectively communicate an original public diplomacy / international public relations campaign.
  • Apply practical media research and interview skills to public diplomacy / international public relations contexts.

Critical Response Tasks

Due: Weeks 1-7
Weighting: 30%

The critical and response task mark will be based on regular preparation for and participation in online discussions, as well as depth of attention to and reflection on weekly activities. It will be comprised of:

Weekly insights on set readings (10%) - Weeks 1-7

Over the 7 weeks you are expected to post 300-400 word reflections on the most important insights gained from the set readings, Note that this task is not simply a summary of what the readings say, but will highlight your ability to pull out key points that particularly interest you. That is, you will clearly explain the key concept/s or idea/s in your own words and then explain why they are interesting to you e.g. you may explain how particular points changed the way you thought about a particular topic, how they were particularly useful for analysing a situation in your country or a country you are studying, how they were addressed similarly or differently by different authors, or you may link ideas in the readings with other ideas discussed by other students or in lectures, or with current stories in the media. You should end each insight with an interesting or provocative question to discuss with your classmates. 

These insights should be posted by 10am on the Tuesday of the same week the readings correspond to, except for Week 1 readings for which you may have an extra week as you ease into the unit (i.e. insights on Week 1 and Week 2 readings will be due at 10am Tues 7 March/Week 2, Week 3 insights on readings will be due by 10am Tues 14 March/Week 3 etc.). 

It is not necessary to cover every reading in each post, but your ability to succinctly compare and contrast particular ideas across readings over the 7 weeks will be highly regarded.

These insights should be posted to an online blog that will be set up in ilearn. 

Please label your posts Week 1, Week 2 etc. so it is clear which week is being addressed for each post (you may add other interesting headings alongside these if you like).

Note that you will not be able to see other students' posts until you have posted your own insights and questions.

You will be marked on your ability to:

*Strategically select interesting ideas from one or more readings to focus on (one key idea is enough for each post)

*Reflect on and relate ideas with depth of thought and attention in a way that seems important to you personally (i.e. they are not simply summaries of readings)

*Write clearly and succinctly (within the word limit)

Response to questions and/or ideas raised by classmates and/or by the teacher in the lecture (10%) - Weeks 2-7

Within the same blog post you will have a separate section responding to at least one issue or idea raised by other classmates and/or by the teacher in the lecture. Choose a question or point you thought was particularly provocative or interesting, explain why you chose to respond to this question, and show depth of thought and attention in your response. Responses should be no longer than 300 words. These responses should be in the following week's post (i.e. responses to week 1 and 2 questions can be posted in your Week 3 post, responses to Week 3 questions can be posted in your Week 4 post etc.).

You will be marked on your ability to:

*Strategically select thoughtful questions or points raised by classmates or the teacher to respond to

*Respond in a thoughtful manner that shows respect for the person who raised the question or point and depth of thought and attention in your response. This depth of response will ideally be based on further research on the topic.

*Write clearly and succinctly (within the word limit)

Preparation and media research for interviews and press conferences (10%)

The convenor will also post questions on ilearn for you to respond to on a weekly basis. They will mainly involve some media research and coming up with a position that you could use as a spokesperson at a press conference or media interview for a particular organisation operating in an international context. The responses for this section should be no longer than 300 words and will typically comprise of a short position statement, why you chose this statement, and an outline of what media resourses you accessed (provide these as an annotated reference list) with brief notes about key points from each report that helped you come up with your statement. This can be done as dot points. Precise due dates will be provided in the announcements from the convenor. Ensure you regularly access ilearn or have your email settings properly set up so that you are receiving the announcements on time.

You will be marked on your ability to:

*Write a thoughtful and culturally appropriate position statement

*List and succinctly explain relevant media research that underpinned your choice of statement

*Write clearly and succinctly (within the word limit)

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Note that your responses for all sections of this assessment task will be monitored by the convenor on a weekly basis. The convenor may respond collectively to interesting ideas from posts in lectures and announcements and will provide collective feedback on the posts to indicate how the cohort is going (e.g. things done well and where some of you could improve). However, your posts will not be individually marked until the end of the course, at which time you will receive a collective mark for all your posts based on the marking criteria. It is at the discretion of the the convenor not to mark posts that were not submitted by the deadline. However, please contact the convenor if there have been issues that have been affecting your studies and an alternative post date may be arranged.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Evaluate and analyse theories and debates about image, frames, public diplomacy and international public relations.
  • Evaluate the relationship between hard and soft power, public diplomacy, and international public relations.
  • Analyse public diplomacy / international public relations campaigns.
  • Apply practical media research and interview skills to public diplomacy / international public relations contexts.

Delivery and Resources

An Intensive Unit

In semester 1 2017, ICOM892 will be run as an intensive 7-week course. Given the shorter time frame, we will launch into essential information and activities from Week 1 and it is absolutely essential that you are able to participate from Week 1. If you are going to have difficulties participating from Week 1, please contact the convenor asap.

Weekly Seminars and Lectures

Internal students are required to attend a weekly 3-hour seminar on Tuesdays from 2-5pm in Y3A187 (drama theatre). The seminar will include a range of teacher-led lectures and discussions as well as student-led and small group activities. External students will also be expected to complete activities in an online forum.

Audio recordings of lectures as well as powerpoints of lecture slides will be posted to ilearn by 5pm of the Wednesday following the Tuesday class. External students are expected to access these resources and are needed to fulfill assessment requirements. Please let the convenor know asap if you are having trouble accessing the lectures or any other materials.

Technology Required 

Both Internal and External students are expected to use and access the ICOM892 ilearn site on a weekly basis: http://ilearn.mq.edu.au

iLearn is the main platform for material sharing, communication and for assignment submission. Set readings will be accessible from ilearn.

PC and Internet access are required. Basic computer skills (e.g., Internet browsing to access media content) and skills in word processing (e.g. to write essays) are also a requirement. Students are also expected to be able to use the library database to access recommended readings and scholarly articles for use in essays. Please consult teaching staff for any further, more specific requirements.

Teaching and Learning Strategy 

All readings, lectures, activities and assessments in this unit are designed to be interrelated, meaning that knowledge and skills gained from each activity are designed to build on previous activities. The focus is on building oral and written communication skills that can be applied in public diplomacy and international public relations contexts as well as on knowledge of theories and research methods that underpin the development of thoughtful, practical and culturally appropriate communication approaches. Analysis of recent and current case studies are also an important part of learning the kinds of communication approaches that work well in particular contexts and the kinds that don't.

Required Readings and Recommended Texts 

Please refer to unit schedule and ilearn for the list of required readings and recommended texts. Electronic copies of the set readings will be available on e-Reserve on the university library website and will be linked to the ICOM892 ilearn site. 

Recommended books include:

  • Melissen, Jan (eds).2005. The New Public Diplomacy: Soft Power in International Relations. Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Snow, Nancy & Philip M. Taylor (eds).2009. The Routledge Handbook of Public Diplomacy. New York: Routledge.
  • Pamment, James. 2012. New Public Diplomacy in the 21st Century: A Comparative Study of Policy and Practice. Routledge.
  • The Palgrave Macmillan Series in Global Public Diplomacy http://us.macmillan.com/series/GlobalPublicDiplomacy (Available via Google Books)

Unit Schedule

Week 1    

 

 

 

                              

Introduction / The world in our heads 

In this seminar we will introduce the field of International Communication and core concepts in relation to public diplomacy and international public relations. We will also introduce the theory of symbolic interactionism to understand how we interact and construct the social world and the related concepts of images and frames. These concepts will be important for your first assessment, the 'Frame Analysis', due in Week 3.

Readings

The world in our heads

  • Mead, George Herbert. 1975 [1975]. “Self”. In Kenneth Thompson and Jeremy Tunstall (eds). Sociological Perspectives. London: Penguin Education,144-158.
  • Pettman, Ralph. 2000. “Conclusion: A constructed world”. In Commonsense constructivism or the making of world affairs. New York: M. E. Sharpe, 210- 239.

Images and Frames (very important for your 'Frame Analysis' assessment)

  • Boulding, Kenneth. 1959 [1956]. “Introduction”. In The Image. New York: Vail-Ballou, 3-18.
  • Pan, Zhongdang & Gerald Kosicki 1993. “Framing analysis: An approach to news discourse”.  Political Communication, 10, 55-75.

Assessment

Begin your online blog posts as per the 'Critical Response Tasks' assessment above.

Week 2

 

 

Media Frames, News Values and Public Opinion

This week we will continue to examine the concepts of image and frames, with a focus on understanding how news agencies represent the world. We will also introduce Habermas' concept of the public sphere in global context, and understand how the public diplomats use the media to influence public opinion in an international context. We continue to build the knowledge and skills needed for your 'Frame Analysis' assessment.

Readings

World-making and news values 

  • Boyd- Barret, Oliver. 1975 [1975]. “Constructing the global, constructing the local: News agencies re-present the world”. In Abbas Malek & Anandan Kavoori (eds). The Global Dynamics of News: Stidoes in International News Coverage and News Agenda. Stamford: Ablex, 299-321. 

Public opinion and the ‘global public sphere’

  • Tomlinson, John. 1994. “Mass communications and the idea of the global public sphere”. The Journal of International Communication  1,2, 57-70
  • Ammon, Royce. 2001. “The Communication-diplomacy Link”. In Global Television and the Shaping of World Politics. Jefferson: McFarland & Co, 5-11.  

Week 3

 

 

 

Media and Foreign Policy

In this session we will explore the role of media in foreign policy. We will also introduce key actors in public diplomacy and explore how diplomats use and engage with the media in contemporary times.

Readings

The media in foreign policy 

  • Naveh, Chanan. 2002. “The role of the media in foreign policy decision-making: A theoretical framework”, Conflict & Communication  Online, 1, 2.
  • Abbas Malek. 1997. “News media and foreign policy: A field ripe for research”. The Journal of International Communication, 4,1, 1 – 10.

Actors and skills in public diplomacy  

  • Lasswell, Harold. “The configurative analysis of the world value pyramids”. World Politics and Personal Insecurity. New York: The Free Press, 3-20.
  • Chitty, Naren. 2009. Frames for internationalizing media research”. In Daya Thussu (ed) Internationalising Media Studies. Oxon: Routledge, 61- 74.

Assessment 

'Frame Analysis' essay due

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 4

 

 

 

 

Diasporic communication

This session will introduce the concept of diasporic publics and explore the types of diasporic communication relevant to public diplomacy and international public relations issues and contexts.

Readings

  • Karim, Karim. 1998. “From ethnic media to global media: Transnational communication networks among diasporic communities”. Paper for International Comparative Research Group, Canadian Heritage.
  • Echchaibi, Nabil. 2002. “(Be)longing media: Minority radio between cultural retention and renewal.” Javnost: The Public. 9, 1, 37-50. 

 

Week 5

 

 

 

Soft power and leadership

This session will explore the concept of soft power and how leaders are attempting to draw on this notion to influence foreign publics to boost support for policies that they see as being favourable for their nation.

Readings 

  • Ronfeldt, David & John Arquilla. 2009. “Noopolitik: A new paradigm for public diplomacy”. In Nancy Snow & Philip M. Taylor (eds) Routledge Handbook of Public Diplomacy. NY: Routledge, 352-356. 
  • Chitty, Naren, 2008. “Broadening public diplomacy”. International Journal of the Humanities, 6,5,47-56.​

 

Week 6

 

 

Models and case studies in public diplomacy and international public relations

In this week we will explore various models of and case studies for engaging with publics in a range of public diplomacy and international public relations contexts, with a focus on student presentations. 

Readings

  • Grunig, James E., Grunig, Larissa A., Sriramesh K ; Yi-Hui Huang  and Anastasia Lyra (1995). “Models of public relations in an international setting”. Journal of Public Relations Research, 7,3, 163-186.
  • Manheim, Jarol B. (1994). “Managing national images”. In Strategic Public Diplomacy & American Foreign Policy”. New York: OUP, 125-147.

Assessment 

Presentations                                      

Week 7

 

 

Models and case studies in public diplomacy and international public relations

In this week we will continue to explore public diplomacy and international public relations case studies, with a focus on student presentations and final reflections on insights and skills learnt from the unit.

Readings

  • Heller, Ken & L. Persson. 2009. “The distinction between public affairs and public diplomacy”. In Nancy Snow & Philip M. Taylor (eds) Routledge Handbook of Public Diplomacy. NY: Routledge, 225-232. 
  • Gregory, Bruce. 2005. “Public diplomacy and strategic communication: cultures, firewalls, and imported norms”. Paper presented at the American Political Science Association, Conference on International Communication and Conflict, George Washington University and Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. http://www8.georgetown.edu/cct/apsa/papers/gregory.pdf

Assessments 

Presentations 

Critical Essay Due

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Additional Information 

MMCCS website https://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/faculties_and_departments/faculty_of_arts/department_of_media_music_communication_and_cultural_studies/

MMCCS Session Re-mark Application http://www.mq.edu.au/pubstatic/public/download/?id=167914

Information is correct at the time of publication

For a full list of minimum requirements to include, please refer to: http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/unit_guide/policy.html

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Evaluate and analyse theories and debates about image, frames, public diplomacy and international public relations.
  • Evaluate the relationship between hard and soft power, public diplomacy, and international public relations.
  • Analyse public diplomacy / international public relations campaigns.
  • Create and effectively communicate an original public diplomacy / international public relations campaign.
  • Apply practical media research and interview skills to public diplomacy / international public relations contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Frame Analysis
  • Critical Essay
  • Individual Presentation
  • Critical Response Tasks

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Evaluate and analyse theories and debates about image, frames, public diplomacy and international public relations.
  • Evaluate the relationship between hard and soft power, public diplomacy, and international public relations.
  • Analyse public diplomacy / international public relations campaigns.
  • Apply practical media research and interview skills to public diplomacy / international public relations contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Frame Analysis
  • Critical Essay
  • Individual Presentation
  • Critical Response Tasks

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Evaluate and analyse theories and debates about image, frames, public diplomacy and international public relations.
  • Evaluate the relationship between hard and soft power, public diplomacy, and international public relations.
  • Analyse public diplomacy / international public relations campaigns.
  • Apply practical media research and interview skills to public diplomacy / international public relations contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Frame Analysis
  • Critical Essay
  • Individual Presentation
  • Critical Response Tasks

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Evaluate and analyse theories and debates about image, frames, public diplomacy and international public relations.
  • Evaluate the relationship between hard and soft power, public diplomacy, and international public relations.
  • Analyse public diplomacy / international public relations campaigns.
  • Create and effectively communicate an original public diplomacy / international public relations campaign.
  • Apply practical media research and interview skills to public diplomacy / international public relations contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Frame Analysis
  • Critical Essay
  • Individual Presentation
  • Critical Response Tasks

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Evaluate and analyse theories and debates about image, frames, public diplomacy and international public relations.
  • Evaluate the relationship between hard and soft power, public diplomacy, and international public relations.
  • Analyse public diplomacy / international public relations campaigns.
  • Create and effectively communicate an original public diplomacy / international public relations campaign.
  • Apply practical media research and interview skills to public diplomacy / international public relations contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Frame Analysis
  • Critical Essay
  • Individual Presentation
  • Critical Response Tasks

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Create and effectively communicate an original public diplomacy / international public relations campaign.
  • Apply practical media research and interview skills to public diplomacy / international public relations contexts.

Assessment tasks

  • Critical Essay
  • Individual Presentation
  • Critical Response Tasks

Changes from Previous Offering

In session 1, 2017, ICOM892 will be offered as an intensive 7-week course. The same material from a normal 13 week course has been condensed into the shorter time frame with 3-hour instead of 2-hour seminars each week (for internal students). All assessments will be due much earlier than in previous offerings. Students need to be prepared to hit the ground running in week 1 and any issues that may affect participation need to be discussed with the convenor as soon as they arise. 

Assignment Submission

No Hard Copy submissions, all the assignments will be submitted to Turnitin on iLearn. 

Information about how to submit work online can be accessed through the iLearn unit.

Return of marked work

During semester, marked work will be returned to students via Turnitin on iLearn. 

Late Submissions

No extensions will be granted. Students who submit late work without an extension will receive a penalty of 10% per day. This penalty does not apply for cases in which an application for Disruptions of Studies is made and approved. 

 

Requirements to Complete the Unit Satisfactorily

  • Timely submission of assessment tasks

Assessment tasks are aligned to the unit Learning Outcomes. Timely submission of assessment tasks is a unit requirement or penalties apply. 10% per day (including weekends) will be deducted for all late submissions unless Disruption to Studies (including a request for an extension) is approved.

  • Weekly online discussion participation 

You are required to participate in all online discussions. As participation in the process of learning is linked to and underpins the unit Learning Outcomes, you will need to either apply for Disruptions to Studies to cover any missed online discussion participation (if the disruption is greater than three consecutive days) or supply appropriate documentation to your unit convenor for any missed online discussion participation (if less than three consecutive days).