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ECON633 – Intermediate Macroeconomics

2017 – S1 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Dr Marjan Nazifi
Contact via fatemeh.nazifi@mq.edu.au
E4A 429
Mondays 1pm-2pm, Extra consultations available through iLearn
Alexander Blair
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MCom or MAcc(Prof)MCom or MBioBus or MEc or MIntBus or MIntBusMIntComm or MIntBusMIntRel
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This is an intensive unit in intermediate macroeconomics, designed to provide the postgraduate student with all the basic macroeconomics required for a general commerce postgraduate program, and serving also as a starting point for specialist studies in postgraduate economics. The unit covers a wide range of the models in use in economics today, including IS-LM, AD-AS, theories of the labour market, and the theory of exchange rates, culminating in the Mundell-Fleming model of an open economy. The unit also provides a substantial introduction to the history of economic thought, allowing students to see the origins of the models they study and so better understand the models themselves. Although a theoretical unit, the contents have a large practical application, with reviews of many of the problems facing the global economy since the beginning of this decade, as well as the attempted solutions. This unit needs no prior knowledge, thus any basic economics and accompanying mathematical and other skills required by the unit's material are taught as part of the unit curriculum.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Understand the theoretical models that form the body of contemporary macroeconomics.
  2. Understand and apply macroeconomic models to various economic problems and issues to analyse the associated empirical implications and policy issues.
  3. Collaborate with others effectively including in teams and be open to new ways of thinking.
  4. Identify, define and analyse problems and recommend creative solutions within real-world constraints.
  5. Demonstrate a capacity to work independently including the ability to plan and achieve goals.

General Assessment Information

NOTES

1. To pass this unit, you do not need to pass each component of assessment. Your final

score is a weighted average of all components.

2. No extensions on assessments will be granted. Students who have not submitted the

task prior to the deadline will be awarded a mark of 0 for the task, except for cases in

which a formal application for disruption of studies is made (via

http://www.ask.mq.edu.au/) and approved.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Group Presentation/Engagement 20% Ongoing
Online Quizzes 20% Week 3, 6, 9, 12
Class_Test 15% Week 7
Final Examination 45% University Examination Period

Group Presentation/Engagement

Due: Ongoing
Weighting: 20%

Students will be organised into groups of 3-5. Groups will be determined at the first tutorial, which will be in Week 2. (There are no tutorials in Week1). All students will work through the tutorial assignments within and as a part of their group, with the group then presenting the solutions to the class (10% as a group work), which along with attendance and engagement at tutorials (10% as individual task) contributes 20% to the final grade. A separate document detailing the tutorial program and the pre-set tutorial questions are made available to students on iLearn.

 

No extensions  will be granted. Students who have not submitted the task prior to the deadline will be awarded a mark of 0 for the task, except for cases in which a formal application for disruption to studies is made (via http://www.ask.mq.edu.au/) and approved.

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:

• Understand the theoretical models that form the body of contemporary macroeconomics.

• Understand and apply macroeconomic models to various economic problems and issues to analyse the associated empirical implications and policy issues.

• Be open to new ways of thinking and appreciate the importance of intellectual curiosity and and reflection as the foundation for continuous learning.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the theoretical models that form the body of contemporary macroeconomics.
  • Understand and apply macroeconomic models to various economic problems and issues to analyse the associated empirical implications and policy issues.
  • Collaborate with others effectively including in teams and be open to new ways of thinking.
  • Identify, define and analyse problems and recommend creative solutions within real-world constraints.

Online Quizzes

Due: Week 3, 6, 9, 12
Weighting: 20%

There will be four online quizzes in this course, each containing 20 multiple choice questions randomly selected from a test bank. Each student will face a slightly different set of questions. The quizzes will be accessed online through iLearn at http://ilearn.mq.edu.au. All students must access and complete the quiz by the closing time. Within this time period, there is no time limit. No extensions will be granted. Students who have not submitted the task prior to the deadline will be awarded a mark of 0 for the task, except for cases in which a formal application for disruption to studies is made (via http://www.ask.mq.edu.au/) and approved.

Students must be aware that IT failures can occur, and that with large numbers of students, congestion can at times limit access. It is the student’s responsibility to plan for these possibilities and completion of the quiz soon after release is strongly advised. While any catastrophic system failures will be taken into account, events such as system outage with three hours to go before the quiz closes will not.

Online quizzes will be available on iLearn at the following dates and times:

Quiz

Released

Availability

1

Week 3

9 pm on Monday in Week 3 – 9 pm on Sunday in Week 4

2

Week 6

9 pm on Monday in week 6 – 9 pm on Sunday in week 7

3

Week 9

9 pm on Monday in week 9 – 9 pm on Sunday in week 10

4

Week 12

9 pm on Monday in week 12  – 9 pm on Sunday in week 13

 

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:

• Understand the theoretical models that form the body of contemporary macroeconomics.

• Understand and apply macroeconomic models to various economic problems and issues to analyse the associated empirical implications and policy issues.

• Demonstrate a capacity to work independently including the ability to plan and achieve goals.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the theoretical models that form the body of contemporary macroeconomics.
  • Understand and apply macroeconomic models to various economic problems and issues to analyse the associated empirical implications and policy issues.
  • Demonstrate a capacity to work independently including the ability to plan and achieve goals.

Class_Test

Due: Week 7
Weighting: 15%

A class-test will be held in week 7. The class test is intended as practice for the final examination. If the class test is missed due to unavoidable disruption you may apply for Disruption to Studies. The conditions for application for Disruption to Studies are set out in the Policies and Procedures section of this Unit Guide. If that application for Disruption to Studies is approved you will be expected to undertake an alternative assessment task, this might involve an oral assessment task.

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:

• Understand the theoretical models that form the body of contemporary macroeconomics.

• Identify, define and analyse problems and recommend creative solutions within real-world constraints.

 • Understand and apply macroeconomic models to various economic problems and issues to analyse the associated empirical implications and policy issues.

• Demonstrate a capacity to work independently including the ability to plan and achieve goals.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the theoretical models that form the body of contemporary macroeconomics.
  • Understand and apply macroeconomic models to various economic problems and issues to analyse the associated empirical implications and policy issues.
  • Identify, define and analyse problems and recommend creative solutions within real-world constraints.
  • Demonstrate a capacity to work independently including the ability to plan and achieve goals.

Final Examination

Due: University Examination Period
Weighting: 45%

A 3-hour final examination for this unit will be held during the University Examination Period for S1 2017. 

No extensions on final exam will be granted. Students who have not sat will be awarded a mark of 0 for the final exam, except for cases in which a formal application for disruption to studies is made (via http://www.ask.mq.edu.au/) and approved.The conditions for application for Disruption to Studies are set out in the Policies and Procedures section of this Unit Guide.

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:

• Understand the theoretical models that form the body of contemporary macroeconomics.

• Understand and apply macroeconomic models to various economic problems and issues to analyse the associated empirical implications and policy issues.

 • Identify, define and analyse problems and recommend creative solutions within real world constraints.

• Demonstrate a capacity to work independently including the ability to plan and achieve goals.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the theoretical models that form the body of contemporary macroeconomics.
  • Understand and apply macroeconomic models to various economic problems and issues to analyse the associated empirical implications and policy issues.
  • Identify, define and analyse problems and recommend creative solutions within real-world constraints.
  • Demonstrate a capacity to work independently including the ability to plan and achieve goals.

Delivery and Resources

CLASSES:

This unit provides 3 hours face-to-face teaching per week consisting of 1 x 2 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour tutorial Lecture slides will be available on the unit web page at http://ilearn.mq.edu.au. During the semester, unforeseen circumstances may require the cancellation of a lecture and/or tutorial. Any changes will be announced as far as possible in advance both in lectures and on the unit website. While attendance at lectures is not compulsory, students are advised that their learning is significantly enhanced by their regular attendance. It is assumed that students will attend all lectures and tutorials. Students who miss lectures put themselves at a significant disadvantage for several reasons, including:

(i) Not all the material in the text is covered in the unit, and not all the material in the unit is covered in the text. In some places the text deals with issues in greater depth than is necessary for the unit, and in other places it doesn’t go far enough. The lectures contain all the unit material taught at the level required for the assessment tasks, and are your guide to the unit content. The tutorials will demonstrate the way questions in macroeconomics are approached.

(ii) The lectures and tutorials will include significant guidance about the style and content of the final exam and recommendations about study technique.

(iii) It is difficult (and often impossible) for staff to provide meaningful assistance to students outside class times on topics for which they did not attend the relevant lectures and tutorials.

Required and Recommended Texts and/or Materials

Recommended Text Available from your Local Co-op Bookshop is the physical text with eBook: "Macroeconomics" with MyEconLab Blanchard and Sheen, 4th edition, 2013 ISBN: 9781486041220 Publisher: Pearson Education.

ALTERNATIVELY the following option is available online from pearson.com.au: Printed text with access code to MyEconLab eBook Go to: www.pearson.com.au/ 9781486041220 FREE DELIVERY This 4th edition is significantly different to the 3rd edition, and students are strongly advised to get access to the 4th edition. MyEconLab is a great resource for students. 

Technology Used and Required Unit Web Page on iLearn

Lecture and tutorial material as well as up to date information concerning any aspect of the unit, including any changes to the schedule, will be available to students by logging on to the unit web page at http://ilearn.mq.edu.au. The following information will be available on iLearn:

Unit Guide; Announcements; Lecture slides; Online quizzes; Results of Assessment tasks; Tutorials; Consultation hours; and Other relevant material.

You are strongly encouraged to regularly visit the website and use it as a resource centre to assist with your learning. If you are unable to access the iLearn website because you are not aware of or have forgotten your username and password, please contact the IT helpdesk located on Level 1 of the Library or call 9850 6500. The IT helpdesk will also be able to assist you with using the unit web page. Please remember to log out when you have finished using the unit web page. Failure to do so could result in unauthorised access to your unit web page account.

MyEconLab

A significant amount of support material for this unit will be from MyEconLab. If you have bought the physical textbook with MyEconLab, you will automatically get an e-book version of the textbook. This e-book can be viewed either through MyEconLab on your computer or through the Pearson eText app on your personal tablet (available on the Apple or Play store.) You are strongly encouraged to regularly visit your MyEconLab for this unit and use it as a resource centre to assist with your learning. It has an excellent section for daily economic News from Australia and the rest of the world (for example, sourced from the ABC, Treasury, Ross Gittins, Financial Times, The Economist, Reuters etc). You can do practice questions from every chapter of the book, and a study plan will be generated to help you understand the areas where you need to do more study.  

Unit Schedule Teaching and Learning Strategy

This unit is taught as a mix of lectures and tutorials. The lectures are designed to provide the tools which can then be applied in tutorials. The tutorials may comprise numerical problems and analytical questions and will be detailed in a separate document on ilearn at the end of week 1. There should be the opportunity to explore issues raised in lectures and to ask questions. The tutorials aim to improve understanding of macroeconomic theory and policy.

• Lectures 

• Independent learning

• Tutorials –beginning in Week 2 

Unit Schedule

TOPIC GUIDE

** obligatory reading;  *optional reading.

Topic 1  Introduction; a brief look at global conditions with a focus on Australia’s recent performance; output and business cycles, inflation, unemployment.

** B&S Chs 1, 2

Various statements and speeches on monetary policy in 2009/10 Reserve Bank of Australia, eg www.rba.gov.au/PublicationsAndResearch/StatementsOnMonetaryPolicy/index.html

**T. Atkin, M. Caputo, T. Robinson and H. Wang (2014), "Macroeconomic Consequences of Terms of Trade Episodes, Past and Present"  http://www.rba.gov.au/publications/rdp/2014/2014-01.html

* J. Kearns, and P. Lowe (2011), “Australia's Prosperous 2000s: Housing and the Mining Boom”, RBA discussion paper series RDP 2011-07. http://www.rba.gov.au/publications/rdp/2011/pdf/rdp2011-07.pdf

Topic 2  The IS-LM model: Short-run goods market and money market equilibrium; monetary policy & fiscal policy; the policy mix – comparing a money supply rule with an interest rate rule.

** B&S Chs 3, 4, 5 **

Reserve Bank of Australia “Monetary Policy”  http://www.rba.gov.au/monetary-policy/index.html

*D Romer (2000), Keynesian Macroeconomics Without the LM Curve, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Spring, pp 149-169, and also NBER Working Paper No. 7461 [www.nber.org/papers/w7461]

Topic 3  The labour market; wage and price setting in the medium run; the natural rate of unemployment; tax distortions and full employment.

** B&S Ch 6

*M. Plumb, M. Baker and G. Spence (2010) “The Labour Market during the 2008–2009 Downturn”, The RBA Bulletin, March 2010

http://www.rba.gov.au/publications/bulletin/2010/mar/1.html

* Jeff Borland (2011) The Australian labour market in the 2000s: A quiet decade. http://www.rba.gov.au/publications/confs/2011/borland.pdf

Topic 4  The AS-AD model: All markets together from the short run to the medium run; aggregate supply; aggregate demand with a fixed money supply and with an interest rate rule using a price level target; monetary, fiscal and oil price shocks in the AS-AD model.

** B&S Ch 7

* G Stevens (2003) “Inflation Targeting: A Decade of Australian Experience” RBA 2003, http://www.rba.gov.au/publications/bulletin/2003/apr/pdf/bu-0403-3.pdf

Topic 5  Evolution of the Phillips curve; theories of expected inflation; the natural rate of unemployment; disinflation; high inflation and deflation.

** B&S Ch 8.

* D Gruen, A Pagan, C Thompson (1999) “The Phillips Curve in Australia” RBA 1999, http://www.rba.gov.au/publications/rdp/1999/1999-01.html

Topic 6  The macroeconomics of financial market crises.

** B&S Ch 9

* L Ellis (2009) “The Global Financial Crisis: Causes, Consequences and Countermeasures”, RBA Bulletin, May 2009 http://www.rba.gov.au/PublicationsAndResearch/Bulletin/bu_may09/Pdf/bu_0509_4.pdf

* B. Bernanke "The Federal Reserve and the Financial Crisis" 2012, http://www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/lectures/about.htm

Topic 7  The Long run: Sources and theories of economic growth and productivity; convergence across countries - PPP comparisons; growth over 2000 years; savings and capital accumulation; the golden rule savings rate

** B&S Chs 10, 11

* P. Romer (1994) “The Origins of Endogenous Growth”, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Winter 1994

* Australian Treasury (2010) "Australia to 2050: Future challenges". Intergenerational Report 2010 archive.treasury.gov.au/igr/igr2010/report/pdf/IGR_2010.pdf

Topic 8  Technology, population growth and the Solow model; institutions, technological progress and growth

** B&S Chs 12, 13

* R Gordon (2000) “Does the ‘New Economy’ Measure up to the Great Inventions of the Past?” Journal of Economic Perspectives, Fall 2000, & http://papersdev.nber.org/papers/W7833

Topic 9  Expectations - expected presented discounted value; nominal vs real interest rates; interest rates and monetary policy; the Fisher hypothesis; macroeconomic determinants of the yield curve or term structure; and of stock market prices; housing prices; expectations and consumption & investment; Tobin’s q; expectations and the IS-LM model.

** B&S Chs 14, 15, 16, 17

Topic 10  The exchange rate; nominal & real, bilateral & multilateral exchange rates; the balance of payments; interest parity condition; the goods market in an open economy; exchange rates and net exports; J-curve; saving, investment and the trade balance.

** B&S Chs 18, 19

* Reserve Bank Bulletin (2005), “Recent Trends in World Saving and Investment Patterns” October 2005, http://www.rba.gov.au/publications/bulletin/2005/oct/pdf/bu-1005-4.pdf

Topic 11  The Mundell-Fleming model under floating exchange rates (with interest rate setting and inflation targeting); fixed exchange rates and exchange rate crises; exchange rate overshooting; choosing the exchange rate regime.

** B&S Chs 20, 21

* G Kelly and G La Cava (2013) "Value-added trade and the Australian economy" RBA Bulletin March 2013, http://www.rba.gov.au/publications/bulletin/2013/mar/pdf/4.html

* I. MacFarlane (2000) “Recent Influences on the Exchange Rate”, RBA Bulletin December 2000, http://www.rba.gov.au/publications/bulletin/2000/dec/pdf/bu-1200-1.pdf

Topic 12  Back to Policy: Uncertainty and macro policy; credibility of policy-makers; fiscal policy and government budget constraint, government debt; challenges from the crisis - the liquidity trap, macroprudential policy.

** B&S Chs 22, 23, 24

** R. Gregory (2013) "Living standards, terms of trade and foreign ownership: reflections on the Australian mining boom" April 2012, The Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Special Issue (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8489.2012.00588.x/abstract)

* E. Connolly, J. Jääskelä and M. van der Merwe (2013) "The Performance of Resource-exporting Economies" RBA Bulletin, http://www.rba.gov.au/publications/bulletin/2013/sep/3.html

 

 

Learning and Teaching Activities

Lectures

Lectures are intended to provide overviews of the conceptual framework and economic data that are critical to the core themes of the unit. Students are expected to read the relevant chapters before each lecture.

Independent learning

A significant amount of learning in this unit is through learning-by-doing (about 6 hours each teaching week and 9 hours each week during the 2-week mid-session recess). ECON633 relies heavily on independent learning where students read the relevant chapter, revise the lecture notes, prepare answers to the tutorial questions and extend themselves by doing additional reading, questions, exercises, problems.

Tutorials -beginning in Week 2

Tutorials constitute a critical learning experience of this unit and students must attend them. Group work is an essential part of learning. In ECON633, we emphasise peer-to-peer learning by working as part of a group through the exercises and learning from others (fellow students and the lecturer). Presenting and explaining concepts to other students will allow you to not only absorb and learn but develop the ability to communicate what you have learnt to others, which will reinforce learning. Together, they will help you fully understand the material in the course. A tutorial is also an active forum to present to the lecturer/tutor any difficulties you encounter when preparing for the pre-set tutorial questions. Ask your lecturer/tutor questions and further guidance on how to approach questions. Students are expected to attempt the tutorial questions before each tutorial.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Grades

Macquarie University uses the following grades in coursework units of study:

 

·         HD - High Distinction (85 - 100)

·         D - Distinction (75 - 84)

·         CR - Credit (65 - 74)

·         P - Pass (50 - 64)

·         F – Fail (0 - 49)

 

Grade descriptors and other information concerning grading are contained in the Macquarie

University Grading Policy which is available at:

 

http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/grading/policy.html

 

For further information, please refer to page 71 of the 2013 Calendar of Governance, Legislation and Rules- Postgraduate Rules at

 

http://universitycouncil.mq.edu.au/pdfs/2013-Postgraduate_rules.pdf

 

Grade Appeals and Final Examination Script Viewing

 

If, at the conclusion of the unit, you have performed below expectations, and are considering lodging an appeal of grade and/or viewing your final exam script please refer to the following website which provides information about these processes and the cut off dates in the first instance. Please read the instructions provided concerning what constitutes a valid grounds for appeal before appealing your grade.

 

http://www.mq.edu.au/reviews-appeals.html

 

Disruption to Studies Policy

 

The University is committed to equity and fairness in all aspects of its learning and teaching. In stating this commitment, the University recognises that there may be circumstances where a student is prevented by unavoidable disruption from performing in accordance with their ability. A Disruption to Studies policy exists to support students who experience serious and unavoidable disruption such that they do not reach their usual demonstrated performance level.The policy is available at: http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/special_consideration/policy.html

 

The University defines serious and unavoidable disruption to studies as resulting from an event or set of circumstances that:

  • could not have reasonably been anticipated, avoided or guarded against by the student; and
  • was beyond the student's control; and
  • caused substantial disruption to the student's capacity for effective study and/or the completion of required work; and
  • substantially interfered with the otherwise satisfactory fulfilment of unit or course requirements; and
  • was of at least three (3) consecutive days duration within a study period and/or prevented completion of the final examination.

A Disruption to Studies application is deemed to be valid if all the following criteria have been satisfied:

·         The Disruption to Studies application is completed by the student and submitted online through www.ask.mq.edu.au within five (5) working days after the due date of the associated assessment task / final examination.

·         The application contains supportingevidence to demonstrate the severity of the circumstance(s) and that substantial disruption has been caused to the student’s capacity for effective study. (The University will not follow up on outstanding evidence, nor contact any person or body on behalf of the student. The application will be considered as submitted.)

·         The original supporting documentation has been sighted by MQC reception staff within five (5) working days after the due date of the associated assessment task.

·         Where the particular circumstances are medical in nature, a Professional Authority Form including the health professional’s Medicare Provider Number is included. (If a Professional Authority Form cannot be obtained, an original medical certificate indicating the severity (serious / not serious) and impact of the circumstances must be included with the application.)

·         Where the particular circumstances are non-medical in nature, appropriate supporting evidence indicating the severity (serious / not serious) and impact of the circumstances is included with the application.

·         The student was performing satisfactorily in the unit up to the date of the unavoidable disruption. (If a student’s work in the unit was previously unsatisfactory, subsequent unavoidable disruption will not overcome the fact that the earlier work was unsatisfactory).

Unacceptable grounds for Disruption to Studies

 

The University has determined that some circumstances are not acceptable grounds for claiming Disruption to Studies. These grounds include, but are not limited, to:

  • routine demands of employment
  • routine family problems such as tension with or between parents, spouses, and other people closely involved with the student
  • difficulties adjusting to university life, to the self-discipline needed to study effectively, and the demands of academic work
  • stress or anxiety associated with examinations, required assignments or any aspect of academic work
  • routine need for financial support
  • routine demands of sport, clubs and social or extra-curricular activities.

Acute Problems

The University defines acute problems as those involving fewer than three (3) consecutive days within a study period. In these cases, students should not apply for special consideration via ask.mq.edu.au, but contact their Unit Convenor within 5 working days of the assessment due date so that a local solution may be discussed, except where the disruption affects completion of a final examination. (If a final examination is affected, the student should submit a special consideration application via ask.mq.edu.au.)

Prior Conditions Conditions existing prior to commencing a unit of study are not grounds for Special Consideration, except in the event of unavoidable deterioration of the condition. The student is responsible for managing their workload in light of any known or anticipated problems. Students with a pre-existing disability/ chronic health condition may contact the Disability Service for information on available support.

In submitting a request for Special Consideration, the student is acknowledging that they may be required to undertake additional work and agreeing to hold themselves available so that they can complete any extra work as required. The time and date, deadline or format of any required extra assessable work as a result of an application for Special Consideration is not negotiable.

 

Attendance

 

All Students are required to attend at least 80% of the scheduled course contact hours each Session.  Additionally MQ monitors the course progress of international students to ensure that the student complies with the conditions of their visa relating to attendance.

This minimum level of attendance includes all lectures and tutorials. Tutorial attendance will be recorded weekly.  If any scheduled class falls on a public holiday this will be rescheduled as advised by your Lecturer. Attendance at any mid-Session or in-class test is compulsory unless otherwise stated.

 

Unavoidable non-attendance due to illness or circumstances beyond your control must be supported by appropriate documentation to be considered for a supplementary test.  Other non-attendance will obtain zero for the test. You should refer to the section below on Special Consideration for more details about this.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Support

Students who require assistance are encouraged to contact the Student Services Manager at Macquarie Campus. Please see reception to book an appointment.

 

Macquarie University provides a range of Academic Student Support Services. Details of these services can be accessed at http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

At any time students (or groups of students) can book our Student Advising rooms on Level 6 by emailing info@mq.edu.au with a day and time and nominated contact person. There are additional student study spaces available on Level 1.

Macquarie University Campus Wellbeing is also available. If you would like to make an appointment, please email info@mq.edu.au or visit their website at: http://www.campuslife.mq.edu.au/campuswellbeing

UNIWISE provides:

·         Online learning resources and academic skills workshops http://www.mq.edu.au/learning_skills

 

·         Personal assistance with your learning & study related questions

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

IT Help

 

If you wish to receive IT help, we would be glad to assist you at http://informatics.mq.edu.au/help/ or call 02 9850-4357.

 

When using the university's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students and it outlines what can be done.

 

Students must use their Macquarie University email addresses to communicate with staff as it is University policy that the University issued email account is used for official University communication.

 

Students are expected to act responsibly when utilising Macquarie  Campus IT facilities. The following regulations apply to the use of computing facilities and online services:

 

·         Accessing inappropriate web sites or downloading inappropriate material is not permitted.

·         Material that is not related to coursework for approved unit is deemed inappropriate.

·         Downloading copyright material without permission from the copyright owner is illegal, and strictly prohibited. Students detected undertaking such activities will face disciplinary action, which may result in criminal proceedings.

 

Non-compliance with these conditions may result in disciplinary action without further notice.

  

 

Graduate Capabilities

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Collaborate with others effectively including in teams and be open to new ways of thinking.
  • Identify, define and analyse problems and recommend creative solutions within real-world constraints.
  • Demonstrate a capacity to work independently including the ability to plan and achieve goals.

Assessment tasks

  • Group Presentation/Engagement
  • Online Quizzes
  • Class_Test
  • Final Examination

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the theoretical models that form the body of contemporary macroeconomics.
  • Understand and apply macroeconomic models to various economic problems and issues to analyse the associated empirical implications and policy issues.
  • Collaborate with others effectively including in teams and be open to new ways of thinking.
  • Identify, define and analyse problems and recommend creative solutions within real-world constraints.

Assessment tasks

  • Group Presentation/Engagement
  • Online Quizzes
  • Class_Test
  • Final Examination

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the theoretical models that form the body of contemporary macroeconomics.
  • Understand and apply macroeconomic models to various economic problems and issues to analyse the associated empirical implications and policy issues.
  • Collaborate with others effectively including in teams and be open to new ways of thinking.
  • Identify, define and analyse problems and recommend creative solutions within real-world constraints.
  • Demonstrate a capacity to work independently including the ability to plan and achieve goals.

Assessment tasks

  • Group Presentation/Engagement
  • Class_Test
  • Final Examination