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ENGL701 – Shakespeare and the Renaissance

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Tony Cousins
Stephanie Russo
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MRes
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
This unit studies poems and plays by Shakespeare and other writers of the English Renaissance in relation to notions of gender, sexuality, identity and power. Students are encouraged to develop their own research projects around these themes, and to consider the unit’s primary texts in the context of the unorthodox, the heretical and the alien.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Acquire a coherent and advanced knowledge of the principles and concepts within a discipline area. Demonstrate an advanced knowledge of research principles and methods.
  2. Synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources. Articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Think critically and make informed and logical judgments of the arguments of others to arrive at reasoned and meaningful arguments and positions, and formulate and apply ideas to new contexts.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to apply accumulated knowledge and skills to make decisions in the context of professional practice and/or scholarship. Demonstrate high standards of ethical conduct in research activities and relationships.

General Assessment Information

Seminar Topics and Questions

1          Introduction

2          How differently do Marlowe and Spenser represent sexuality in the poems set for this week?

3          What forms does the concept of personal identity take in Doctor Faustus?

4          Discuss the implicit critique of heterosexuality in Shakespeare’s Sonnets.

5          Discuss the concept of 'the good life' in the texts set for study for this week.

6          What do the persona of Donne’s third satire and Hamlet have in common?

7          How is the will to power depicted in Macbeth?

8          What is ‘the natural’ in King Lear?

9          Is Othello more concerned with jealousy or with the power of fictions?

10        Discuss Jonson’s modelling of social relations in the play and the poem set for study this week.

11        What is Bacon’s concept of civil life?

12        ‘Marvell is primarily a maker of myths’. Do you agree?

 

Final Assignment Questions

 

1. Consider portrayal of the will to power in one play by Shakespeare and writings by two other authors you have studied this semester?

 

2. How are problems of constructing the self portrayed in three plays you have studied this semester?

 

3. How important are issues of political loyalty in three plays you have studied this semester?

 

4. How do Shakespeare and Jonson use the idea of  meta-drama as a theme in their plays?

 

5. Design a question of your own—but discuss it with me before you start work on it.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
Final Essay 50% Sunday of Week 13
Annotated reading list 20% end of week 6
Presentation/First Essay 30% as described

Final Essay

Due: Sunday of Week 13
Weighting: 50%

 

Write a 3,000-word essay on one of the topics or questions and submit it by the Sunday of Week 13. The final essay requires students to consider at least 3 of the set texts in light of the themes and concerns examined throughout the unit. Like the first essay, this one requires students to demonstrate the capacity for close textual analysis and independent research.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Acquire a coherent and advanced knowledge of the principles and concepts within a discipline area. Demonstrate an advanced knowledge of research principles and methods.
  • Synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources. Articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Think critically and make informed and logical judgments of the arguments of others to arrive at reasoned and meaningful arguments and positions, and formulate and apply ideas to new contexts.
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply accumulated knowledge and skills to make decisions in the context of professional practice and/or scholarship. Demonstrate high standards of ethical conduct in research activities and relationships.

Annotated reading list

Due: end of week 6
Weighting: 20%

Construct a reading list for a topic or question, but not for the topic or question on which you will be working for the presentation/first essay or for the final essay. The list should include a mix of older and more recent research (published within the last 5 years), analysing the main arguments of the texts considered, and showing how the texts relate to each other. The list should begin with an introductory overview and end with a formal conclusion. The main criteria for successfully completing this assignment lie not in the discovery of materials—that will be easy—but in which materials you select, how you organize them, and how you choose to analyse them. The assignment’s focus is on research skills and techniques. The assignment has a 1,000 word limit.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Acquire a coherent and advanced knowledge of the principles and concepts within a discipline area. Demonstrate an advanced knowledge of research principles and methods.
  • Synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources. Articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Think critically and make informed and logical judgments of the arguments of others to arrive at reasoned and meaningful arguments and positions, and formulate and apply ideas to new contexts.
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply accumulated knowledge and skills to make decisions in the context of professional practice and/or scholarship. Demonstrate high standards of ethical conduct in research activities and relationships.

Presentation/First Essay

Due: as described
Weighting: 30%

 

Choose one of the seminar topics or questions and in class deliver a 10 minute discussion focused on it. A week later submit the presentation as expanded into a 1,000-word essay. The presentation requires students to demonstrate communications skills; the presentation and the first essay both require students to demonstrate the capacity for close analysis of text (by whatever methodology) and the ability to research independently: that is, to engage independently with current scholarship.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Acquire a coherent and advanced knowledge of the principles and concepts within a discipline area. Demonstrate an advanced knowledge of research principles and methods.
  • Synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources. Articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Think critically and make informed and logical judgments of the arguments of others to arrive at reasoned and meaningful arguments and positions, and formulate and apply ideas to new contexts.
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply accumulated knowledge and skills to make decisions in the context of professional practice and/or scholarship. Demonstrate high standards of ethical conduct in research activities and relationships.

Delivery and Resources

Seminars E2.

 

http://ilearn.mq.edu.au

Arts Student Centre

Phone:

+61 2 9850 6783

Email:

artsenquiries@mq.edu.au

Office:

W6A/Foyer

 

Centre staff are there to smooth the way into university life; answer questions; give informed advice; provide a sympathetic ear; de-mystify uni ways and procedures.

 

Attendance at seminars is compulsory, as are delivery of the presentation and submission of the assignments. As has been mentioned above, extensions will be given only in exceptional circumstances. Late work will be penalised at the rate of 2% per day.

Plagiarism

The University defines plagiarism in its rules: “Plagiarism involves using the work of another person and presenting it as one’s own.” Plagiarism is a serious breach of the University’s rules and carries significant penalties. Information about plagiarism can be found in the Handbook of Undergraduate Studies, and on the web at http//www.student.mq.edu.au/plagiarism/. If you are in doubt consult your lecturer or tutor.

Unit Schedule

Week 1

 

Introduction

 

Week 2

 

Marlowe: Hero and Leander; Spenser: Amoretti

 

Week 3

 

Marlowe: Doctor Faustus

 

Week 4

 

Shakespeare: The Sonnets

 

Week 5

 

Shakespeare: Antony and Cleopatra; Donne: The Sun Rising

 

Week 6

 

Shakespeare: Hamlet; Donne: SatireIII

 

Week 7

 

Shakespeare: Macbeth

 

Week 8

 

Shakespeare: King Lear

 

Week 9

 

Shakespeare: Othello

 

Week 10

 

Jonson: Volpone and To Penshurst

 

Week 11

 

Bacon: New Atlantis and Essays

Week 12

 

 Marvell: Poems

 

Week 13

Preparation for Final Essay

 

 

Learning and Teaching Activities

Annotated reading list

Construct a reading list for a topic or question, but not for the topic or question on which you will be working for the presentation/first essay or for the final essay.

Presentation/First Essay

Choose one of the seminar topics or questions and in class deliver a 10 minute discussion focused on it. A week later submit the presentation (to your tutor) as expanded into a 1,000-word essay.

Final Essay

Write a 3,000-word essay on one of the topics or questions and submit it, online or at the Faculty of Arts Office on level 1 of W6A, by the end of 15 November.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Seeks to follow all required procedures in order to implement all relevant policies.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Students will be directed to support as deemed necessary.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Students will be made aware of availability of Enquiry Service.

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

Students will be made aware of Equity Support as may be necessary.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Compliance with Policy advocated.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Acquire a coherent and advanced knowledge of the principles and concepts within a discipline area. Demonstrate an advanced knowledge of research principles and methods.
  • Synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources. Articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Think critically and make informed and logical judgments of the arguments of others to arrive at reasoned and meaningful arguments and positions, and formulate and apply ideas to new contexts.
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply accumulated knowledge and skills to make decisions in the context of professional practice and/or scholarship. Demonstrate high standards of ethical conduct in research activities and relationships.

Assessment tasks

  • Final Essay
  • Annotated reading list
  • Presentation/First Essay

Learning and teaching activities

  • Construct a reading list for a topic or question, but not for the topic or question on which you will be working for the presentation/first essay or for the final essay.
  • Choose one of the seminar topics or questions and in class deliver a 10 minute discussion focused on it. A week later submit the presentation (to your tutor) as expanded into a 1,000-word essay.
  • Write a 3,000-word essay on one of the topics or questions and submit it, online or at the Faculty of Arts Office on level 1 of W6A, by the end of 15 November.

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Acquire a coherent and advanced knowledge of the principles and concepts within a discipline area. Demonstrate an advanced knowledge of research principles and methods.
  • Synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources. Articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Think critically and make informed and logical judgments of the arguments of others to arrive at reasoned and meaningful arguments and positions, and formulate and apply ideas to new contexts.
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply accumulated knowledge and skills to make decisions in the context of professional practice and/or scholarship. Demonstrate high standards of ethical conduct in research activities and relationships.

Assessment tasks

  • Final Essay
  • Annotated reading list
  • Presentation/First Essay

Learning and teaching activities

  • Construct a reading list for a topic or question, but not for the topic or question on which you will be working for the presentation/first essay or for the final essay.
  • Choose one of the seminar topics or questions and in class deliver a 10 minute discussion focused on it. A week later submit the presentation (to your tutor) as expanded into a 1,000-word essay.
  • Write a 3,000-word essay on one of the topics or questions and submit it, online or at the Faculty of Arts Office on level 1 of W6A, by the end of 15 November.

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Acquire a coherent and advanced knowledge of the principles and concepts within a discipline area. Demonstrate an advanced knowledge of research principles and methods.
  • Synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources. Articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Think critically and make informed and logical judgments of the arguments of others to arrive at reasoned and meaningful arguments and positions, and formulate and apply ideas to new contexts.
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply accumulated knowledge and skills to make decisions in the context of professional practice and/or scholarship. Demonstrate high standards of ethical conduct in research activities and relationships.

Assessment tasks

  • Final Essay
  • Annotated reading list
  • Presentation/First Essay

Learning and teaching activities

  • Construct a reading list for a topic or question, but not for the topic or question on which you will be working for the presentation/first essay or for the final essay.
  • Choose one of the seminar topics or questions and in class deliver a 10 minute discussion focused on it. A week later submit the presentation (to your tutor) as expanded into a 1,000-word essay.
  • Write a 3,000-word essay on one of the topics or questions and submit it, online or at the Faculty of Arts Office on level 1 of W6A, by the end of 15 November.

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Acquire a coherent and advanced knowledge of the principles and concepts within a discipline area. Demonstrate an advanced knowledge of research principles and methods.
  • Synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources. Articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Think critically and make informed and logical judgments of the arguments of others to arrive at reasoned and meaningful arguments and positions, and formulate and apply ideas to new contexts.
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply accumulated knowledge and skills to make decisions in the context of professional practice and/or scholarship. Demonstrate high standards of ethical conduct in research activities and relationships.

Assessment tasks

  • Final Essay
  • Annotated reading list
  • Presentation/First Essay

Learning and teaching activities

  • Construct a reading list for a topic or question, but not for the topic or question on which you will be working for the presentation/first essay or for the final essay.
  • Choose one of the seminar topics or questions and in class deliver a 10 minute discussion focused on it. A week later submit the presentation (to your tutor) as expanded into a 1,000-word essay.
  • Write a 3,000-word essay on one of the topics or questions and submit it, online or at the Faculty of Arts Office on level 1 of W6A, by the end of 15 November.

Learning Outcomes Information

All academic programmes at Macquarie seek to develop graduate capabilities. These are:

COGNITIVE CAPABILITIES

 

  1. Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

 

  1. Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher-level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

 

  1. Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

 

INTERPERSONAL and PERSONAL DISPOSITIONS

 

  1. Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats

 

  1. Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

 

  1. Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

 

Note: The numbers listed at the end of each Learning Outcome indicate how it is aligned with the Graduate Capabilities.

 

The learning outcomes of this unit are: (Link to graduate capabilities in brackets):  

At the completion of this unit students will:

Acquire a coherent and advanced knowledge of writings by Shakespeare and by his contemporaries;

synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources, and acquire an understanding of rhetorical practices and of genre in early modern British texts;

gain insights into the social environment of early modern British texts, and be able to articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences;

think critically and make informed and logical judgments of the arguments of others to arrive at reasoned and meaningful arguments and positions, and formulate and apply ideas to new contexts;

demonstrate the ability to apply accumulated knowledge and skills to make decisions in the context of professional practice and/or scholarship; and

demonstrate high standards of ethical conduct in research activities and relationships (all outcomes link with 1-4, 6 above).

 

How LOs work at the level of the unit:

In alignment with the Masters of Research Program aims, the emphasis in the expected learning outcomes is on advanced rather than on introductory or merely competent knowledge and understanding. The level of thinking required of students is such as to enhance and advance their capacities for critical thinking across a range of literary works. Independence of thought, increased self-reflection, and a greater capacity for shaping individual research-essay topics are all expected and encouraged at this level. Students are expected to gain advanced knowledge not just of current scholarship in the field, but of how this scholarship shapes current debates and how their own research practices can engage with and intervene in these debates.  

 

700-Level Learning Outcomes

KNOWLEDGE (2):

Acquire a coherent and advanced knowledge of the principles and concepts within a discipline area.

Demonstrate an advanced knowledge of research principles and methods.

SKILLS (3):

Synthesize and analyze information from a variety of sources.

Articulate clearly a coherent argument in written and oral form to a variety of audiences.

Think critically and make informed and logical judgments of the arguments of others to arrive at reasoned and meaningful arguments and positions, and formulate and apply ideas to new contexts.

APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS (2):

Demonstrate the ability to apply accumulated knowledge and skills to make decisions in the context of professional practice and/or scholarship.

Demonstrate high standards of ethical conduct in research activities and relationships.