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ANTH800 – Applied Anthropology: Why Does Culture Matter?

2017 – S1 Evening

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Convenor
Eve Vincent
Contact via via email
W6A, 611
Tuesday 5-6pm
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MDevStud or MGlobalHlthDevStud or GradCertGlobalHlthDevStud or MDevStudGlobalHlth or GradCertDevStudGlobalHlth or MAppAnth or MDevCult or MSocEntre or MPASR or GradDipPASR or GradDipPP or MPPP or 4cp in ANTH units at 800 level
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Co-badged with ANTH700
Unit description Unit description
This unit examines the uses of culture in professional settings at various levels, from the management of urban communities and interpersonal conflicts to the international strategies of corporations and governments. The objective of this unit is to train students for situations in a variety of contexts in which decisions have to be made based on contested cultural claims.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Students are capable of discussing the role of culture in professional settings, at various levels, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They are able to explore and critque the literature and professional practices I relation to relevant theories.
  2. Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology and applied anthropology in relation to cultural issues in professional settings at all levels. They can explain and critically access the extent to which culture matters in such settings from a variety of perspectives.
  3. Students can apply critical and creative approaches to the role of culture in professional settings at all levels. They can appraise appropriate research methodologies in the field of applied anthropology and plan and develop an independent research project that uses applied anthropology methods and its critical theory.
  4. The students will be able to apply applied anthropology methods in oral and written form and clearly present the results of research and work carried out in a detailed and appropriately structured report. They also demonstrate effective oral, written and visual communication skills that are appropriate to the purpose, mediam and audience.
  5. Students are aware of ethical issues in professional contexts and also with respect to minorities and indigenous perspectives in contemporary and historical contexts. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. They have respect for diversity, to be openminded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a high level of cultural literacy. They are critically aware of disadvantage and social justice, and keen to participate to help create a wiser and better society.
  6. Students have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They can design, implement, manage, monitor and evaluate projects in real world contexts. They are capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Discussion 30% Weekly
First Essay 35% Sunday following weekly topic
Second essay 35% Sunday following weekly topic

Discussion

Due: Weekly
Weighting: 30%

Lead discussion on one question of choice, and active attendance and engagement with the literature, seminar discussions, and online discussion board.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Students are capable of discussing the role of culture in professional settings, at various levels, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They are able to explore and critque the literature and professional practices I relation to relevant theories.
  • Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology and applied anthropology in relation to cultural issues in professional settings at all levels. They can explain and critically access the extent to which culture matters in such settings from a variety of perspectives.
  • The students will be able to apply applied anthropology methods in oral and written form and clearly present the results of research and work carried out in a detailed and appropriately structured report. They also demonstrate effective oral, written and visual communication skills that are appropriate to the purpose, mediam and audience.
  • Students are aware of ethical issues in professional contexts and also with respect to minorities and indigenous perspectives in contemporary and historical contexts. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. They have respect for diversity, to be openminded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a high level of cultural literacy. They are critically aware of disadvantage and social justice, and keen to participate to help create a wiser and better society.
  • Students have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They can design, implement, manage, monitor and evaluate projects in real world contexts. They are capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

First Essay

Due: Sunday following weekly topic
Weighting: 35%

Critical summary of the weekly topic on which the student presented, between 2,000 and 2,500 words in length.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Students are capable of discussing the role of culture in professional settings, at various levels, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They are able to explore and critque the literature and professional practices I relation to relevant theories.
  • Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology and applied anthropology in relation to cultural issues in professional settings at all levels. They can explain and critically access the extent to which culture matters in such settings from a variety of perspectives.
  • Students can apply critical and creative approaches to the role of culture in professional settings at all levels. They can appraise appropriate research methodologies in the field of applied anthropology and plan and develop an independent research project that uses applied anthropology methods and its critical theory.
  • Students are aware of ethical issues in professional contexts and also with respect to minorities and indigenous perspectives in contemporary and historical contexts. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. They have respect for diversity, to be openminded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a high level of cultural literacy. They are critically aware of disadvantage and social justice, and keen to participate to help create a wiser and better society.
  • Students have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They can design, implement, manage, monitor and evaluate projects in real world contexts. They are capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

Second essay

Due: Sunday following weekly topic
Weighting: 35%

Critical summary of a chosen weekly topic, between 2,000 and 2,500 words in length.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Students are capable of discussing the role of culture in professional settings, at various levels, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They are able to explore and critque the literature and professional practices I relation to relevant theories.
  • Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology and applied anthropology in relation to cultural issues in professional settings at all levels. They can explain and critically access the extent to which culture matters in such settings from a variety of perspectives.
  • Students can apply critical and creative approaches to the role of culture in professional settings at all levels. They can appraise appropriate research methodologies in the field of applied anthropology and plan and develop an independent research project that uses applied anthropology methods and its critical theory.
  • Students are aware of ethical issues in professional contexts and also with respect to minorities and indigenous perspectives in contemporary and historical contexts. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. They have respect for diversity, to be openminded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a high level of cultural literacy. They are critically aware of disadvantage and social justice, and keen to participate to help create a wiser and better society.
  • Students have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They can design, implement, manage, monitor and evaluate projects in real world contexts. They are capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

Delivery and Resources

Unit readings are available via the library website: search for 'Anth800' under the 'unit readings' tab. Our seminars are on Tuesdays at 6:00pm – 8:00pm in W6A, room 708.

Unit Schedule

The following books have been placed on reserve:

  • Vijayendra Rao and Michael Walton, eds. Culture and Public Action. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2004. Accompanying website: www.cultureandpublicaction.org.
  • Joana Breidenbach and Pal Nyiri, Seeing Culture Everywhere: From Genocide to Consumer Habits. Seattle and London: University of Washington Press, 2009.
  • Unni Wikan, Generous Betrayal: Politics of Culture in the New Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001.
  • Tony Bennett and David Carter, eds. Culture in Australia: Policies, Publics and Programs. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001.
  • John and Jean Comaroff, Ethnicity, Inc. Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2009. 
  • Patrick Chabal and Jean-Pascal Dalloz, Culture Troubles: Politics and the Interpretation of Meaning. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006. 
  • Jean-François Bayart, The Illusion of Cultural Identity. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005.
  • Dvora Yanow, Constructing ‘Race’ and ‘Ethnicity’ in America. Armonk: M. E. Sharpe, 2002.
  • Werner Schiffauer et al. eds. Civil Enculturation: Nation-State, Schools and Ethnic Difference in Four European Countries. Oxford: Berghahn, 2002.
  • Anne Fadiman, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1998.
  • Bruce H. Ziff and Pratima V. Rao, eds. Borrowed Power: Essays on Cultural Appropriation. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1997.
  • Timothy de Waal Malefyt and Brian Moeran, eds. Advertising Cultures. Oxford: Berg, 2003.
  • Haun Saussy, ed. Partner to the Poor: A Paul Farmer Reader. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2010.
  • Brian Moeran, The Business of Ethnography. Oxford: Berg, 2005.
  • Alison Dundes Renteln, The Cultural Defense. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004.
  • David Turton, ed. War and Ethnicity : Global Connections and Local Violence. Boydell, 2003. 

PART ONE: Critical perspectives on culture

Week 1: Does culture matter?

  • Introduction to Seeing Culture Everywhere: From Genocide to Consumer Habits. Seattle and London: University of Washington Press, 2009.
  • Ulf Hannerz, When Culture is Everywhere. Reflections on a favorite concept, in Transnational Connections. London: Routledge, 1996, 30-43.
  • Robert Borofsky, Fredrik Barth, Richard A. Shweder, Lars Rodseth, and Nomi Maya Stolzenberg, WHEN: A Conversation About Culture, American Anthropologist, 103(2), 2001, 432-446.

Extended reading:

  • Michel-Rolph Trouillot,  Adieu, Culture: A New Duty Arises. In Michel-Rolph Trouillot, ed. Global Transformations: Anthropology and the Modern World, Palgrave MacMillan, 2003, 97-116.

***

Week 2: Multiculturalism in crisis?

  • Joel Kahn, The 'Culture' in Multiculturalism: A View from Anthropology, Meanjin, 50(1), Autumn 1991,48-52.
  • Christian Joppke, The Retreat of Multiculturalism in the Liberal State: Theory and Policy, British Journal of Sociology 55(2), 237-257.
  • Thomas Hylland Eriksen, Diversity versus difference: Neo-liberalism in the minority debate, in Richard Rottenburg, Burkhard Schnepel, Shingo Shimada, eds. The Making and Unmaking of Difference, Bielefeld: Transaction 2006,  pp. 13–36. 

Also read one of the following case studies:    

  • Greg Noble, The Discomfort of Strangers: Racism, Incivility and Ontological Security in a Relaxed and Comfortable Nation, Journal of Intercultural Studies, 26 (1-2), 2005, 107-20.
  • Amanda Wise, Hope and Belonging in a Multicultural Suburb, Journal of Intercultural Studies 26(1-2), 2005, 171-186
  • Mikkel Rytter, ‘The Family of Denmark’ and ‘the Aliens’” Kinship Images in Danish Integration Politics, Ethnos, 75(3), 2010, 301-322.
  • Peter Hervik, Ending tolerance as a solution to incompatibility: The Danish ‘crisis of multiculturalism’, European Journal of Cultural Studies, 15(2), 2012, 211–225.

Extended reading:

  • Alana Lentin, Post-race, post politics: the paradoxical rise of culture after multiculturalism, Ethnic and Racial Studies, 2012, DOI: 10.1080/01419870.2012.664278
  • Will Kymlicka, The Theory and Practice of Immigrant Multiculturalism, in Politics in the Vernacular. Nationalism, Multiculturalism, and Citizenship. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995, 152-175.
  • Carole Nagengast, Inoculations of Evil in the US-Mexican Border Region, in Alexander Laban Hinton, Annihilating Difference. Berkeley, Los Angeles, London: University of California Press, 2002, 325-347.
  • Amartya Sen, Chili and Liberty, The New Republic, 27 February 2006. www.pierretristam.com/Bobst/library/wf-58.htm
  • Amanda Wise and Selvaraj Velayutham, Conviviality in Everyday Multiculturalism: Some Brief Comparisons Between Singapore and Sydney, European Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 17, no. 4, 2014, pp. 406-430.
  • Jason Hickel, '"Xenophobia" in South Africa: Order, Chaos, and the Moral Economy of Witchcraft.' Cultural Anthropology 29(1), 2014, 103–127.

***

Week 3: Indigenous cultures: a global perspective

  • Charles Hale, Does Multiculturalism Menace? Governance, Cultural Rights and the Politics of Identity in Guatemala, Journal of Latin American Studies, 34, 2002, 485-524.
  • James Clifford, Indigenous Articulations, in Returns: Becoming Indigenous in the Twenty-First Century, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2013, 50-67.
  • Mahmood Mamdani, Beyond Settler and Native as Political Identities: Overcoming the Political Legacy of Colonialism, Comparative Studies in Society and History, 43 (4), 2001, 651-664.

Extended reading:

  • Adam Kuper, The Return of the Native, Current Anthropology, 44( 2), 2003, 389-4.
  • Glen Coulthard, Subjects of Empire: Indigenous Peoples and the ‘Politics of Recognition’ in Canada. Contemporary Political Theory, 6, 2007, 437. doi:10.1057/palgrave.cpt.9300307
  • Alberto Gomes, Anthropology and the Politics of Indigeneity, Anthropological Forum, 23 (1), 2013, 5-15.
  • Jim Igoe, Becoming Indigenous Peoples: Difference, Inequality, and the Globalisation of East African Identity Politics, African Affairs, 105/420, 2006, 399-420.

***

Week 4: Culture at school, the culture of schools

  • Megan Watkins and Greg Noble, The Ethnicization of Educational Achievement in Disposed to Learn, London: Bloomsbury, 2013, 15-34.
  • Paul Willis, Elements of a Culture, in Learning to Labour, Saxon House, 1977, 11-51.
  • Christina Ho, Respecting the Presence of Others: School Micropublics and Everyday Multiculturalism, Journal of Intercultural Studies, 32 (6), 2011, 605-21.

Extended readings:

  • Christina Ho, Eve Vincent and Rose Butler. Everyday and Cosmo-Multiculturalisms: Doing Diversity in Gentrifying School Communities, Journal of Intercultural Studies, 36( 5), 2015, 658-67.
  • Jessica Walton et al, Talking culture? Egalitarianism, color-blindness and racism in Australian elementary schools. Teaching and Teacher Education, 39, 2014, 112-122.
  • Maia Cucchiara, '"Are We Doing Damage?" Choosing an Urban Public School in an Era of Parental Anxiety', Anthropology & Education Quarterly, 44 (1), 2013, 75-93.
  • Jane Kenway Challenging inequality in Australian schools: Gonski and beyond, Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education 34, 2013, 286-308.
  • Thea Hewitt, Rethinking Encounter: intercultural interactions between parents in Australia's culturally diverse primary schools, Australian Geographer 47, 2016, 355-370.

***

Week 5: Culture commodifed

  • John and Jean Comaroff, Prologue and Commodifying Descent, American Style, in Ethnicity Inc. Chicago University Press, Chicago, 2009.
  • Paul Stoller, Afrocentric Marketing, in Money Has No Smell, Chicago University Press, Chicago, 2002.
  • Marion Markwick, Marketing Myths and the Cultural Commodification of Ireland: Where the Grass Is Always Greener, Geography, 86(1), 2001, 37-49.

Extended reading: 

  • Bruner, E. The Maasai and the Lion King: Authenticity, Nationalism, and Globalization in African Tourism. American Ethnologist,  28(4), 2001, 881-908.
  • Ben Dibley, Antipodean Aesthetics, Public Policy and the Museum: Te Papa, for example, in Timothy Neale, Crystal McKinnon and Eve Vincent (eds). History, Power, Text: Cultural Studies and Indigenous Studies. Sydney: UTS E-Press, 2014, 271-290,
  • Patrick Wilson, Ethnographic Museums and Cultural Commodification Indigenous Organizations, NGOs, and Culture as a Resource in Amazonian Ecuador, Latin American Perspectives, 30(1) 2003, 162-180.

***

Week 6: The culturalisation of global conflict

  • Samuel P. Huntington, The clash of civilizations? Foreign Affairs, 72(3), 1993, 22-28.
  •  Mahmood Mamdani, Good Muslim, Bad Muslim: A Political Perspective on Culture and Terrorism, American Anthropologist 104(3), 2002, 766-775.
  • Robert M. Hayden, Imagined Communities and Real Victims: Self-Determination and Ethnic Cleansing in Yugoslavia. American Ethnologist 23(4), 1996, 783-84.
  • Simon Harrison, Cultural Difference as Denied Resemblance: Reconsidering Nationalism and Ethnicity, Comparative Studies in Society & History, 45(2), 2003, 343-61.

Extended reading:

  • Tone Bringa, Averted Gaze: Genocide in Bosnia-Herzegovina, 1992-1995, in Alexander Laban Hinton, Annihilating Difference. Berkeley, Los Angeles, London: University of California Press, 2002, 194-228.
  • Arjun Appadurai, Dead Certainty: Ethnic Violence in the Era of Globalization, Public Culture , 10(2), 1998, 225-247.
  • Francis Fukuyama, Has History Restarted Since September 11? 19th Annual John Bonython Lecture, Centre of Independent Studies, Melbourne, 8 August 2002. evans-experientialism.freewebspace.com/fukujama02.htm
  • Norvell B. De Atkine, The Arab Mind Revisited (preface to Raphael Patai, The Arab Mind). www.meforum.org/636/the-arab-mind-revisited

*** 

Week 7: Culture, gender, sexuality

  • Lila Abu-Lughod, Do Muslim Women Really Need Saving? Anthropological Reflections on Cultural Relativism and Its Others, American Anthropologist 104(3), 2002, 783-790.
  • Uma Narayan, Essence of Culture and a Sense of History: A Feminist Critique of Cultural Essentialism, Hypatia, 13(2), 86-106.
  • Aeyal Gross, Post/Colonial Queer Globalisation and International Human Rights: Images of LGBT Rights, Jindal Global Law Review, Volume 4, Issue 2, November 2013.
  • Sahar Saba, For Amnesty International Occupation is Women Liberation, Viewpoint, Issue 34, January 2013, http://www.viewpointonline.net/for-amnesty-international-occupation-is-women-liberation.html 

Extended reading:

  • Richard A. Shweder, What about 'Female Genital Mutilation'? And Why Understanding Culture Matters in the First Place, Daedalus, 129(4), 2000, 209-232.
  • Ratna Kapur, Un-veiling Women’s Rights in the ‘War on Terrorism’, Duke Journal of Gender Law and Policy, 9:211, 2002, 211-225.
  • Gargi Bhattacharyya, 'The Misuse of Feminism in Foreign Policy', in Dangerous Brown Men: Exploiting Sex, Violence and Feminism in the War on Terror, London and New York: Zed Books, 2008, 18-45.
  • Maira Sunaina, 'Good'; and ‘Bad’ Muslim Citizens: Feminists, Terrorists, and U. S. Orientalisms, Feminist Studies, 35(3), 2009, 631-656.
  • Sherene H. Razack, Imperilled Muslim Women, Dangerous Muslim Men and Civilized Europeans: Legal and Social Responses to Forced Marriages, Feminist Legal Studies, 12, 2004, 129-174.
  • Inderpal Grewal, 'Security Moms’ in the Early Twentieth-Century United States: The Gender of Security in Neoliberalism, Women's Studies Quarterly, 34 (1/2), 2006,  25-39. 
  • Jin Haritaworn, with Tamsila Tauqir and Esra Erdem, Gay Imperialism: Gender and Sexuality Discourse in the ‘War on Terror', in Adi Kuntsman and Esperanza Miyake (eds.) Out of Place: Interrogating Silences in Queerness/Raciality, York: Raw Nerve Books, 2008.
  • Amr Shalakany, On a Certain Queer Discomfort with Orientalism, American Society of International Law, Vol. 101, 2007, 125-129.
  • Sujatha Fernandes, Stories and Statecraft: Afghan Women's Narratives and the Construction of Western Freedoms (Forthcoming). Signs

Mid-semester break: Monday April 17-Friday April 28

PART 2: Culture in context: practical concerns

Week 8: Culture in Aid and Development.

Guest instructor: Joe Rickson. Readings TBA

Week 9: Spotlight 1: The work of Paul Farmer.

Readings TBA

Week 10: Research week.

No class

Week 11: Spotlight 2. To be decided together in Week 7 at the latest.

Week 12: Spotlight 3. To be decided together in Week 7 at the latest.

Week 13: Discussion and evaluation 

 

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Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

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Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

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Graduate Capabilities

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students are capable of discussing the role of culture in professional settings, at various levels, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They are able to explore and critque the literature and professional practices I relation to relevant theories.
  • Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology and applied anthropology in relation to cultural issues in professional settings at all levels. They can explain and critically access the extent to which culture matters in such settings from a variety of perspectives.
  • Students can apply critical and creative approaches to the role of culture in professional settings at all levels. They can appraise appropriate research methodologies in the field of applied anthropology and plan and develop an independent research project that uses applied anthropology methods and its critical theory.
  • Students are aware of ethical issues in professional contexts and also with respect to minorities and indigenous perspectives in contemporary and historical contexts. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. They have respect for diversity, to be openminded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a high level of cultural literacy. They are critically aware of disadvantage and social justice, and keen to participate to help create a wiser and better society.
  • Students have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They can design, implement, manage, monitor and evaluate projects in real world contexts. They are capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

Assessment tasks

  • Discussion
  • First Essay
  • Second essay

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students are capable of discussing the role of culture in professional settings, at various levels, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They are able to explore and critque the literature and professional practices I relation to relevant theories.
  • Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology and applied anthropology in relation to cultural issues in professional settings at all levels. They can explain and critically access the extent to which culture matters in such settings from a variety of perspectives.
  • The students will be able to apply applied anthropology methods in oral and written form and clearly present the results of research and work carried out in a detailed and appropriately structured report. They also demonstrate effective oral, written and visual communication skills that are appropriate to the purpose, mediam and audience.
  • Students are aware of ethical issues in professional contexts and also with respect to minorities and indigenous perspectives in contemporary and historical contexts. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. They have respect for diversity, to be openminded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a high level of cultural literacy. They are critically aware of disadvantage and social justice, and keen to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

Assessment tasks

  • Discussion
  • First Essay
  • Second essay

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students are capable of discussing the role of culture in professional settings, at various levels, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They are able to explore and critque the literature and professional practices I relation to relevant theories.
  • Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology and applied anthropology in relation to cultural issues in professional settings at all levels. They can explain and critically access the extent to which culture matters in such settings from a variety of perspectives.
  • Students can apply critical and creative approaches to the role of culture in professional settings at all levels. They can appraise appropriate research methodologies in the field of applied anthropology and plan and develop an independent research project that uses applied anthropology methods and its critical theory.
  • Students have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They can design, implement, manage, monitor and evaluate projects in real world contexts. They are capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

Assessment tasks

  • Discussion
  • First Essay
  • Second essay

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students are capable of discussing the role of culture in professional settings, at various levels, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They are able to explore and critque the literature and professional practices I relation to relevant theories.
  • Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology and applied anthropology in relation to cultural issues in professional settings at all levels. They can explain and critically access the extent to which culture matters in such settings from a variety of perspectives.
  • Students can apply critical and creative approaches to the role of culture in professional settings at all levels. They can appraise appropriate research methodologies in the field of applied anthropology and plan and develop an independent research project that uses applied anthropology methods and its critical theory.

Assessment tasks

  • Discussion
  • First Essay
  • Second essay

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students are capable of discussing the role of culture in professional settings, at various levels, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They are able to explore and critque the literature and professional practices I relation to relevant theories.
  • Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology and applied anthropology in relation to cultural issues in professional settings at all levels. They can explain and critically access the extent to which culture matters in such settings from a variety of perspectives.
  • Students are aware of ethical issues in professional contexts and also with respect to minorities and indigenous perspectives in contemporary and historical contexts. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. They have respect for diversity, to be openminded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a high level of cultural literacy. They are critically aware of disadvantage and social justice, and keen to participate to help create a wiser and better society.
  • Students have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They can design, implement, manage, monitor and evaluate projects in real world contexts. They are capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

Assessment tasks

  • Discussion
  • First Essay
  • Second essay

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Students are capable of discussing the role of culture in professional settings, at various levels, both from a theoretical perspective and from a practitioners point of view. They are able to explore and critque the literature and professional practices I relation to relevant theories.
  • Students are capable of discussing, debating and evaluating various theories of anthropology and applied anthropology in relation to cultural issues in professional settings at all levels. They can explain and critically access the extent to which culture matters in such settings from a variety of perspectives.
  • Students can apply critical and creative approaches to the role of culture in professional settings at all levels. They can appraise appropriate research methodologies in the field of applied anthropology and plan and develop an independent research project that uses applied anthropology methods and its critical theory.
  • Students are aware of ethical issues in professional contexts and also with respect to minorities and indigenous perspectives in contemporary and historical contexts. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. They have respect for diversity, to be openminded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a high level of cultural literacy. They are critically aware of disadvantage and social justice, and keen to participate to help create a wiser and better society.
  • Students have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They can design, implement, manage, monitor and evaluate projects in real world contexts. They are capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

Assessment tasks

  • Discussion
  • First Essay
  • Second essay