Logo Students

PICT806 – Police Leadership and Governance

2017 – S1 External

General Information

Pdf icon Download as PDF
Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Convenor
Garry Dobson
Contact via garry.dobson@mq.edu.au
by appointment
Lecturer
Vincent Hurley
Contact via vincent.hurley@mq.edu.au
Credit points Credit points
4
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to MCRIM or MPICT or MCPICT or PGDipPICT or GradDipPICT or GradDipCPICT or PGCertPICT or GradCertPICT or GradCertCPICT or MPICTMIntSecSt or MCPICTMIntSecSt or MIntSecStud or PGCertIntell
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
In modern Western democracies the issues of leadership and governance are never far from the surface of any policing organisation. What was historically a bureaucratically static and non-responsive organisation driven by rules and regulations with an elaborate hierarchy, is now a decentralised, proactive, open and accountable organisation that not only reacts to important issues but often leads the debate with respect to changes in public policy and legislation. Whilst not all policing organisations are the same, there has been a shift in the past 20 years in the direction of the characteristics described. This unit will explore the critical policing issues of leadership and governance with specific emphasis on discerning how that applies in the policing/public sector. It will also examine the developing move towards policing becoming a profession.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Evaluate how the history and practice of policing has played a critical role in structuring contemporary policing
  2. Investigate the impact of internal and external dynamics affecting policing
  3. Critique the strengths and weaknesses of competing and evolving strategies employed in contemporary policing
  4. Critique the often competing and contradictory claims and representations of the popular media, scholars and practitioners regarding strategic policing issues
  5. Examine and explore critical texts, concepts and theories relating to policing

General Assessment Information

Please note that in order to qualify for a minimum of a passing grade all assessment tasks identified on the iLearn site for this Unit must be attempted and submitted on the system

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Quiz No 1 5% Week 4
Minor Assignment 20% end of week 8
Major Assignment 40% end of week 12
Quiz No 2 35% Week 13

Quiz No 1

Due: Week 4
Weighting: 5%

Online quiz based on Weeks 1-4 of the Unit. See iLearn for details.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Evaluate how the history and practice of policing has played a critical role in structuring contemporary policing
  • Investigate the impact of internal and external dynamics affecting policing
  • Examine and explore critical texts, concepts and theories relating to policing

Minor Assignment

Due: end of week 8
Weighting: 20%

See iLearn site for details


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Evaluate how the history and practice of policing has played a critical role in structuring contemporary policing
  • Critique the strengths and weaknesses of competing and evolving strategies employed in contemporary policing
  • Critique the often competing and contradictory claims and representations of the popular media, scholars and practitioners regarding strategic policing issues
  • Examine and explore critical texts, concepts and theories relating to policing

Major Assignment

Due: end of week 12
Weighting: 40%

See iLearn site for details


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Evaluate how the history and practice of policing has played a critical role in structuring contemporary policing
  • Investigate the impact of internal and external dynamics affecting policing
  • Critique the strengths and weaknesses of competing and evolving strategies employed in contemporary policing
  • Critique the often competing and contradictory claims and representations of the popular media, scholars and practitioners regarding strategic policing issues
  • Examine and explore critical texts, concepts and theories relating to policing

Quiz No 2

Due: Week 13
Weighting: 35%

Online quiz based on Weeks 5 - 13 of the Unit. See iLearn for details.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Investigate the impact of internal and external dynamics affecting policing
  • Critique the strengths and weaknesses of competing and evolving strategies employed in contemporary policing
  • Examine and explore critical texts, concepts and theories relating to policing

Delivery and Resources

UNIT REQUIREMENTS AND EXPECTATIONS

  • You should spend an average of at least 12 hours per week on this unit. This includes listening to pre-recorded lectures prior to seminar discussions and reading weekly required readings detailed in iLearn.
  • Internal students are expected to attend all seminar sessions and external students are expected to contribute to on-line discussions.
  • Students are required to submit assessment tasks 1, 2, 3 and 4 in order to pass the unit.

REQUIRED READINGS

  • The citations for all the required readings for this unit are available to enrolled students through the unit iLearn site and at Macquarie University's Library eReserve site. 

RECOMMENDED READINGS

  • Recommended readings will be posted to the unit iLearn site as the Session progresses.
  •  There are no prescribed textbooks for this unit, students might consider obtaining a copy of the following books:  
  •  

TECHNOLOGY USED AND REQUIRED

  • Personal PC and internet access are essential for this unit. Basic computer skills and skills in word processing are also a requirement.
  • The unit can only be accessed by enrolled students online through http://ilearn.mq.edu.au

SUBMITTING ASSESSMENT TASKS

  • All assessment tasks are to be submitted, marked and returned electronically.  This will only happen through the unit iLearn site. 
  • Assessment tasks must be submitted as an MS word document by the due date.
  • All assessment tasks will be subject to a 'TurnitIn' review as an automatic part of the submission process.
  • Assessment tasks do not require a coversheet but students should be aware that by submitting your assignment you are certifying its originality and your ownership of the work.
  • The granting of extensions are subject to "Disruption to Studies" policy of the University. Please refer to the MQ website for details. Lecturing staff do not have authority to grant extensions without penalty. The policy for this is detailed under Policy and Procedures.

LATE SUBMISSION OF ASSESSMENT TASKS

There is a penalty for the the late submission of assessment tasks.  If an assignment is submitted late it will initially be marked as if it had been submitted on time.  However, 5%of the weighting allocated for the assignment will then be deducted from the mark the student initially achieves in the assessment task for each day it is late. For example if the assessment task's weighting is 20, 1.00 mark per day will be deducted from the initial mark given per day it is late ie a task initially given 15/20 but which is submitted four days late will lose 4 x 1.00 marks.  That means 15/20 - 4 marks=11/20.  It is this second mark which will be recorded in gradebook.   

The same principle applies if a student seeks and is granted an extension and the assessment task is submitted later than the amended submission date.

Unit Schedule

 

Week 1

Introduction, Definition and Context:This session is designed to set the direction and focus for the semester, outlining student expectations and requirements. It then further expands on the basic concepts of leadership, governance, professionalisation and social media as a tool.

 

Week 2

History of Policing in the Western World:Policing emerged from a change in the relationship between state and society. Its antecedents can be traced back centuries before Robert Peel, but he is credited with the establishment of the first professional police force in the world. Before establishing “The Met”, Peel had created the Irish Constabulary. There could be no sharper difference between the two. This session maps out the key historical developments in policing and provides an analysis of how that has shaped the police forces of today.

 

Week 3

Leadership Issues in a Policing Context:The traditional perspectives of police officers organised along para-military lines, operating as a machine bureaucracy have become outdated. In contemporary society, new police officers are prepared to question authority and decision making, often seeking justification and understanding of the context in which decisions are taken. The advent of new technologies, flexible work practices and an increasing mobility of the workforce requires different approaches to leadership. This session will examine some of the key issues as they relate to leadership practices in a policing environment.

 

Week 4

Principles of Command:Notwithstanding the changing dynamic of the workplace with respect to leadership practices, the nature of the business that is policing will always require the exercise of command and control in certain circumstances. This session will examine the principles of command, giving consideration to the context that requires the exercise of this form of authority, the methods and practices employed and assessment of what works and what doesn’t.

 

Week 5

Change Management and Adaptivity:The key strategic factors influencing policing are growing. Political, economic, social, technological and environment factors all impact on the policing landscape. The growing impact of global issues such as human trafficking, guns, organised crime, cyber-crime and drugs, to name a few require police leaders to be flexible and adaptive to a constantly changing environment. Repositioning police forces to take best advantage of capability and capacity will become even more crucial in declining budgetary environments. This session will examine leadership issues in the context of this changing environment.

 

Week 6

Integrating Strategy, Culture and Political Influences:Modern policing demands an almost continual development process with respect to strategy. Election cycles for governments are becoming more condensed leading to policy platforms that impact significantly on the capacity of policing executives to commit to long term actions. In this constantly changing environment sits the people of the organisation with a strong culture of peer level support and broad distrust of their superiors.This session provides the opportunity to analyse and consider a range of critical organisational issues that developing solutions to problems, driving organisational change and removing barriers to improved performance.

 

Week 7

The Separation of Powers:Montesquieu’s Treatise on the American Constitution gave rise to the concepts embedded in the Separation of Powers. Since that time reference to the independence of a police force from its government has been the subject of much debate and confusion. Intertwined has been the notion of the independence of the office of constable of police, often mistaken for being the same thing. In this session as a segway into modern concepts of police accountability and governance we will examine the history and basis for the “Separation of Powers” and its application to the relationship between government and police agency. We will also examine the concepts attached to the “Independence of the Office of Constable of Police” relied upon so strongly in many western democracies.

Week 8

Governance and Accountability Frameworks:The significant power and authority vested in police officers and their agencies carries with it significant burdens with respect to governance and accountability, an issue that for many police officers and leaders causes a great deal of discomfit. The western democratic system requires that if the community cedes authority to a group to act on its behalf then they have the right to satisfy themselves that the exercise of that authority is in their best interests. It is upon this principle that the creation of governance and accountability frameworks for police agencies will be examined. We will examine the contract between community and agency, transparency in operations and the systems in place to ensure abuse of authority is absent.

 

Week 9

Corruption Prevention:History records that corruption in the public sector generally and police agencies in particular are somewhat cyclical. A major issue is identified and exposed through some form of public hearing; the government of the day and police agency implement a significant raft of reforms with the object of designing the issues out of the organisation; at a future point in time a review is conducted and the pronouncement made that the issue is if not eradicated at least under control. Then around a decade later a variation of the original issue develops or even a new issue arises with similar elements and the process repeats. Such is the importance of the corruption function, around the world specific agencies and commissions have been established to monitor and investigate police agency activities.

 

Week 10

Culture, Ethics and Discretion:The attitudes of police officers can greatly affect the way in which they use necessarily wide discretion in the exercise of their powers and discharge of their functions. These attitudes, which are not always positive, can in varying degrees be shaped by vocationally-determined informal occupational acculturation. The formal standards and expectations for ethical conduct affecting police officers are higher than in comparable vocations, yet corruption remains a perennial problem. This session examines the phenomena of “police culture”, the nature of professional ethics, the exercise of discretion and how police are held accountable for their conduct.

 

Week 11

Social Media and Policing:The emergence of social media as a law enforcement tool is having a profound effect on policing. The use of social networking platforms to communicate and engage with individuals and groups provides the kind of accurate and immediate communication that had previously been thought of as impossible. Similarly, but from a counter perspective, those engaged in unlawful and criminal behaviour are using the very same technology to organise their activities. We are now experiencing the challenge of using this technology to spread the good news, prevent or limit the bad news and in some cases form the basis of a criminal prosecution. In this session we will examine the phenomenon that is collectively referred to as “Social Media” and consider the implications of its use from a policing perspective.

 

Week 12

Policing as a Profession:The notion of policing as a profession has been widely debated for decades. In some jurisdictions the movement towards a profession has been much stronger than in others. Not just across nations but within nations there is continuing debate about the relative merits of moving policing from an occupation to a profession. The issues have been somewhat confused with the introduction of “professionalism” into the debate. In this session we will tease out the issues of what it means to be a profession, what the implications of being a profession mean and how that contrasts with the concepts of professionalism.

 

Week 13

Transitioning to a Profession:The movement from occupation to profession is not one that can be done by decree. It requires a clear and manageable strategy to transition the organisation, the police officers, the government and the community into a new way of thinking and performance. This session will look at how an occupation like policing can transition into a profession, building on the experiences of other “new” professions.

 

 

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Evaluate how the history and practice of policing has played a critical role in structuring contemporary policing
  • Investigate the impact of internal and external dynamics affecting policing
  • Critique the strengths and weaknesses of competing and evolving strategies employed in contemporary policing
  • Critique the often competing and contradictory claims and representations of the popular media, scholars and practitioners regarding strategic policing issues
  • Examine and explore critical texts, concepts and theories relating to policing

Assessment tasks

  • Quiz No 1
  • Minor Assignment
  • Major Assignment
  • Quiz No 2

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Investigate the impact of internal and external dynamics affecting policing
  • Critique the strengths and weaknesses of competing and evolving strategies employed in contemporary policing
  • Critique the often competing and contradictory claims and representations of the popular media, scholars and practitioners regarding strategic policing issues
  • Examine and explore critical texts, concepts and theories relating to policing

Assessment tasks

  • Minor Assignment
  • Major Assignment
  • Quiz No 2

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Evaluate how the history and practice of policing has played a critical role in structuring contemporary policing
  • Investigate the impact of internal and external dynamics affecting policing
  • Critique the strengths and weaknesses of competing and evolving strategies employed in contemporary policing
  • Critique the often competing and contradictory claims and representations of the popular media, scholars and practitioners regarding strategic policing issues
  • Examine and explore critical texts, concepts and theories relating to policing

Assessment tasks

  • Quiz No 1
  • Minor Assignment
  • Major Assignment
  • Quiz No 2

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Evaluate how the history and practice of policing has played a critical role in structuring contemporary policing
  • Investigate the impact of internal and external dynamics affecting policing
  • Critique the strengths and weaknesses of competing and evolving strategies employed in contemporary policing
  • Critique the often competing and contradictory claims and representations of the popular media, scholars and practitioners regarding strategic policing issues
  • Examine and explore critical texts, concepts and theories relating to policing

Assessment tasks

  • Quiz No 1
  • Minor Assignment
  • Major Assignment
  • Quiz No 2

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critique the strengths and weaknesses of competing and evolving strategies employed in contemporary policing
  • Examine and explore critical texts, concepts and theories relating to policing

Assessment tasks

  • Quiz No 1
  • Minor Assignment
  • Major Assignment
  • Quiz No 2

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critique the often competing and contradictory claims and representations of the popular media, scholars and practitioners regarding strategic policing issues
  • Examine and explore critical texts, concepts and theories relating to policing

Assessment tasks

  • Minor Assignment
  • Major Assignment