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GEOP200 – Environment and Society

2017 – S2 Day

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Co-Convenor
Emily O'Gorman
Contact via email
W3A 420
email for appointment
Unit Co-Convenor
Ashraful Alam
Contact via email
W3A 429
email for appointment
Unit Co-Convenor
Tasmin-Lara Dilworth
Contact via email
W3A 422
email for appointment
Tutor
Yayut Yi-shiuan Chen
Contact via email
W3A 429
email for appointment
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
12cp at 100 level or above
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
With an emphasis on the Australasian region, this exciting interdisciplinary unit explores how societies and ecologies are entwined and develops creative ways of approaching environmental dilemmas. It is designed to be self-contained, for students from a range of backgrounds, including those without a scientific background. Bringing together perspectives from the sciences, social sciences, and humanities, it examines the concepts of environment and sustainability, together with their past and possible future socio-political and economic framings. The historical and contemporary contexts of key environmental issues in Australia are explained along with their connections to global events and perspectives, including climate change, invasive species, water management, environmental protection movements, and links between consumption and production. Current planning frameworks and management processes, including legal and legislative mechanisms are also considered, along with emerging strategies and social movements that aim to address existing and expected problems. Students are engaged in learning through guest lecturers who are experts in their field, through interactive case study examples, and active communication in tutorials.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Understand the mutually shaping forces of societies and ecologies in producing environmental dilemmas
  2. Understand some of the main historical and contemporary contexts of environmental issues in Australia and their connection to global events and perspectives
  3. Identify, and critically examine, key environmental issues
  4. Be prepared and able to respond to diverse perspectives and approaches to environments, societies and sustainability
  5. Understand and evaluate advanced concepts and academic texts
  6. Assess, sort, and synthesise information in oral presentations, small group discussions, and written work

General Assessment Information

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

All assignments are to be submitted via Turnitin, the university online submission and marking system - found as a link in iLearn. Turnitin includes Grademark, a paperless grading system where your assignments are marked by staff online. Submissions are also checked for plagiarism by Turnitin. Turnitin automatically compares your work to the work of your classmates, previous students and material available on the internet. Hard copies of assignments are no longer accepted and will not be marked.

For more information on Turnitin and Grademark:

http://mq.edu.au/iLearn/student_info/assignments.htm

DEADLINES, EXTENSIONS AND PENALTIES

Deadlines set for assignment submissions will not be altered except in exceptional circumstances. In all cases, extensions must be applied for before the due date and must be supported with appropriate documentation (medical certificate, counsellor's certificate, statutory declaration). Where an unavoidable disruption warrants an extension, you may also wish to consider applying for Disruption to Studies. Requests for disruption to studies are submitted via ask.mq.edu.au. Instructions on how to submit your disruption to studies request can be found here: http://ask.mq.edu.au/kb.php?record=ce7c4e38-4f82-c4d7-95b1-4e2ee8fd075f

Extensions will not be granted in cases of poor time management.  Only the Unit Convenor can authorise extensions. Late submissions will not be accepted once marked assignments have been returned unless otherwise approved by the Unit Convenor.

Late assignments will incur a late penalty of 10% of the total mark per day. Weekends will be counted as 2 days. Students who fail to complete and submit ALL assignments and sit exams for the Unit WILL FAIL THE UNIT (i.e. all assessment tasks must be completed as a minimum prerequisite to pass the Unit). Penalties will also be incurred for plagiarism, that is, the use of another persons’ work and presentation as your own (see University Policies and http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html).

GRADING

Each assignment will be marked, commented upon and returned to you via Turnitin and Grademark. Grading is conducted in line with the universities grading policy (http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/grading/policy.html)

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Tutorial Participation 10% Weeks 2 - 12 tutorial sessions
Essay outline 5% 5pm, Friday 25 August 2017
Essay 35% 5pm, Monday 2 October 2017
Oral Presentation 10% Weeks 10-12 tutorial sessions
Final Exam 40% TBA

Tutorial Participation

Due: Weeks 2 - 12 tutorial sessions
Weighting: 10%

Task: Attend all tutorials, read the assigned readings and present one of them if requested

Attendance will be recorded for all tutorial sessions. If you attend less than 80% of the tutorial sessions marks will be deducted. For each week’s tutorial you need to read the two assigned readings, which are the basis of group discussions and other tutorial activities. These will be posted on the Unit's iLean site. Be prepared to present each of them to the class if called on by the tutor. In each week’s tutorial, two people will be selected randomly to present a brief (5 minutes) summary of one of the assigned readings and to facilitate a class discussion. You will not be allowed to use Microsoft Powerpoint or any other electronic presentation tools but you will be allowed to use the whiteboard if you wish. Your performance will be assessed using a simple marking sheet that indicates the strength of your contributions. All students will be expected to participate in the discussion of the readings.

Tutorial participation includes listening to your classmates' oral presentations (see below) in tutorial sessions in weeks 10-12 and asking them questions about their presentation. 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the mutually shaping forces of societies and ecologies in producing environmental dilemmas
  • Understand some of the main historical and contemporary contexts of environmental issues in Australia and their connection to global events and perspectives
  • Identify, and critically examine, key environmental issues
  • Be prepared and able to respond to diverse perspectives and approaches to environments, societies and sustainability
  • Understand and evaluate advanced concepts and academic texts
  • Assess, sort, and synthesise information in oral presentations, small group discussions, and written work

Essay outline

Due: 5pm, Friday 25 August 2017
Weighting: 5%

Word length: 300 words (excluding references)

This task relates to the Essay task (see below). A small selection of essay topics will be posted on iLearn in the first week of the teaching session. Choose an essay topic and write a proposed outline of a full length essay, including the main argument(s). This outline must be fully referenced. You must refer to at least four academic journal articles and include a bibliography with full citation details.

Choose your topic carefully as this will be the same topic for your full length essay. Only in exceptional circumstances will students be allowed to change topics for their full length essays.

Submission requirements:

Submit via iLearn using the Turnitin link. Penalties will apply in case of late submissions.

Style: written prose (minimise use of dot points), no less than 1.5 line spacing and no smaller than 11pt font.

References: ensure you reference your work. See: http://www.students.mq.edu.au/support/learning_skills/undergraduate/academic_skills_quick guides/


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the mutually shaping forces of societies and ecologies in producing environmental dilemmas
  • Understand some of the main historical and contemporary contexts of environmental issues in Australia and their connection to global events and perspectives
  • Identify, and critically examine, key environmental issues
  • Be prepared and able to respond to diverse perspectives and approaches to environments, societies and sustainability
  • Understand and evaluate advanced concepts and academic texts
  • Assess, sort, and synthesise information in oral presentations, small group discussions, and written work

Essay

Due: 5pm, Monday 2 October 2017
Weighting: 35%

Word length: 2,500 words (excluding references)

This task relates to the Essay outline (see above). Taking into consideration the feedback you received on your essay outline, write a full length essay on the same topic. Only in exceptional circumstances will students be allowed to change topics from the one they selected for the Essay outline task.

Further information on presentation of written assignments and hints on essay preparation will be provided on the unit's iLearn site. Essays must be written in light of the Assessment Standards. Late essays attract a penalty of 10% per day. After five (5) days, the piece of work will be assessed only on the basis of Pass or Fail; no marks will be allocated to it. Please note that all assessment items must be completed in order to pass the Unit.

Submissions requirements:

Submit via iLearn in “Word” format using the Turnitin link. Versions submitted as “.pdf” will be returned to the student and late penalties may apply. 

Style: essay, no less than 1.5 line spacing and no smaller than 11pt font. References: ensure you reference your work. See: http://www.students.mq.edu.au/support/learning_skills/undergraduate/academic_skills_quick guides/

You are expected to use approximately 13-15 different sources (for example, articles, chapters in edited collections and books).


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the mutually shaping forces of societies and ecologies in producing environmental dilemmas
  • Understand some of the main historical and contemporary contexts of environmental issues in Australia and their connection to global events and perspectives
  • Identify, and critically examine, key environmental issues
  • Be prepared and able to respond to diverse perspectives and approaches to environments, societies and sustainability
  • Understand and evaluate advanced concepts and academic texts
  • Assess, sort, and synthesise information in oral presentations, small group discussions, and written work

Oral Presentation

Due: Weeks 10-12 tutorial sessions
Weighting: 10%

Length of presentation: 5 mins presentation + 2 mins Q&A

This is a reflective task. Choose an experience from your own life and relate it to key concepts from the tutorial readings. You must engage with at least three readings in depth. The readings could be selected across different tutorial weeks, they do not need to be from the same week. It is better to think about your reading selection in terms of concepts, or to illustrate a point in your discussion. Present your reflection (which MUST include analysis) to your tutorial group. Presentations will be held in tutorials in weeks 10-12.

You can choose to focus on any experience but it must be relevant to the themes of the unit and illuminate the Unit's concepts and readings you discuss. Experiences might focus on, for instance:

  • An encounter (for example, with an animal)

  • A place (for example, a particular spot on the harbour)

  • A conversation (for example, that made you think differently)

  • An item or object (for example, a water bottle)

You will be assessed on your ability to summarise concepts and readings and to relate these to your chosen experience. Your mark will also reflect your capacity to answer questions following your presentation. These will relate to the content of your presentation and include one question from the tutor and one to two questions from your classmates.

Your presentation must:

  • be clear and concise
  • be reflective
  • relate to an experience from your own life
  • engage with key concepts from the tutorial readings (three readings in depth)

This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the mutually shaping forces of societies and ecologies in producing environmental dilemmas
  • Understand some of the main historical and contemporary contexts of environmental issues in Australia and their connection to global events and perspectives
  • Identify, and critically examine, key environmental issues
  • Be prepared and able to respond to diverse perspectives and approaches to environments, societies and sustainability
  • Understand and evaluate advanced concepts and academic texts
  • Assess, sort, and synthesise information in oral presentations, small group discussions, and written work

Final Exam

Due: TBA
Weighting: 40%

The final exam will comprise 15 short answer questions and 1 essay. The composition for the 2017 exam will be similar to the one of 2016 which is different from earlier years. Please note that there will only be 1 essay and the exam time will remain as 2 hours. Familiarity with the Unit's lecture materials is a key to pass this exam.

The date, time and venue for this exam will be determined by the University's examination timetable but will be held in the examination period.

 


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the mutually shaping forces of societies and ecologies in producing environmental dilemmas
  • Understand some of the main historical and contemporary contexts of environmental issues in Australia and their connection to global events and perspectives
  • Identify, and critically examine, key environmental issues
  • Understand and evaluate advanced concepts and academic texts
  • Assess, sort, and synthesise information in oral presentations, small group discussions, and written work

Delivery and Resources

Technology

GEOP200 has a website which is accessible via www.mq.edu.au/iLearn. Here you can get access to unit materials, copies of lecture slides, notices and a general discussion place to pose questions to staff.

Students are not required to acquire any technology for this unit but are expected to access the iLearn site and to use computers to produce their assignments.

Lecture

Lecture 10:00am - 12:00pm Tuesday 14 Sir Christopher Ondaatje Ave (E7B) T3 Theatre

Tutorials

Please see the university timetable for tutorial times and locations at https://timetables.mq.edu.au/2017/

Unit Schedule

Week

Date     

Lecture Schedule (subject to change)

Tutorial

Assessments 

1

1 Aug

Welcome (AA and TD)

1. Environment and Society I (AA)

2. Environment and Society II (TD)

No tutorials

 

Part 1: Commodities and globalisation

 

 

2

8 Aug

3. Attitude to the environment (TD)

4. Resources and 'resourcification' (TD)

Values and resources

 

3

15 Aug

5. Political ecology of cities I (TD)

6. Political ecology of cities II (guest lecture: Dr. Donna Houston)                                     

Cities, ecology and politics

 

4

22 Aug

7. Circulations I (TD)

8. Circulations II (TD)

Power and movement

Essay outline due (5%): 5pm, Friday 25 August

5

29 Aug

9. Circulations III (TD)

10. Place and production (TD)

Politics, place and production 

 

Part 2: Social movements and values

 

 

6

5 Sept

11. Introduced species in Australian history (guest lecture: Dr. Peter Hobbins)

12. Species protection and eradication (AA)

Protection and eradication

 

7

12 Sept

13. Urban metabolisms I (AA)

14. Urban metabolisms II (AA)

Essay preparation

 

Mid-session break: 18 September to 1 October

Essay due (35%): 5pm, Monday 2 October

8

3 Oct

15. Climate migration and disasters I (AA)

16. Climate migration and disasters II (AA)

Climate change, migration and disaster

 

9

10 Oct

17. Protected areas (TC)

18. Conservation, biodiversity and international agreements (TC)

Politics of protected areas

 

Part 3: Emergent pathways

 

 

10

17 Oct

19. Indigenous peoples, justice, and climate change I (TC)

20. Indigenous peoples, justice, and climate change II (TC)

Student presentations

Oral presentation (10%): weeks 10-12

11

24 Oct

21. Water and sustainability: a Sydney perspective (guest lecture: Louise Roberts, Sydney Water)

22. Water and society (TC)

Student presentations

 

12

31 Oct

23. Alternative economies (TC)

24. Degrowth (TC)

Student presentations

 

13

7 Nov

25. Synthesis (AA)

26. Exam preparation (AA)

No Tutorials

Final exam (40%)– In exam period

Examination period:  13 November to 1 December

 

 

AA – Ash Alam; TC - Tara Cater; TD – Tasmin Dilworth

 

Learning and Teaching Activities

Alignment with objectives

The overall Unit Objectives are: 1. to provide an overview of the influences, factors and perspectives that have to be considered in relation to environment and society; 2. to describe major environmental issues, discuss causes and possible future pathways. The lectures are supplemented by a series of participatory small-group tutorials – tutorial topics are co-ordinated and allied to the lecture subjects for that week. In addition, a 300 word essay outline is due in week 4 and then a 2500 word essay (on one of several set subjects) is due at the end of the mid-session break. Students deliver a short oral presentation in the final weeks of the session. Key background theory is assessed by a short answer and essay in a final exam. The four types of progressive assessment are designed to spread the demands and to give all students flexibility and a fair opportunity to demonstrate knowledge and competence, while permitting benefit from particular interests or skills.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the mutually shaping forces of societies and ecologies in producing environmental dilemmas
  • Understand some of the main historical and contemporary contexts of environmental issues in Australia and their connection to global events and perspectives
  • Identify, and critically examine, key environmental issues
  • Be prepared and able to respond to diverse perspectives and approaches to environments, societies and sustainability
  • Understand and evaluate advanced concepts and academic texts
  • Assess, sort, and synthesise information in oral presentations, small group discussions, and written work

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Participation
  • Essay outline
  • Essay
  • Oral Presentation
  • Final Exam

Learning and teaching activities

  • The overall Unit Objectives are: 1. to provide an overview of the influences, factors and perspectives that have to be considered in relation to environment and society; 2. to describe major environmental issues, discuss causes and possible future pathways. The lectures are supplemented by a series of participatory small-group tutorials – tutorial topics are co-ordinated and allied to the lecture subjects for that week. In addition, a 300 word essay outline is due in week 4 and then a 2500 word essay (on one of several set subjects) is due at the end of the mid-session break. Students deliver a short oral presentation in the final weeks of the session. Key background theory is assessed by a short answer and essay in a final exam. The four types of progressive assessment are designed to spread the demands and to give all students flexibility and a fair opportunity to demonstrate knowledge and competence, while permitting benefit from particular interests or skills.

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the mutually shaping forces of societies and ecologies in producing environmental dilemmas
  • Understand some of the main historical and contemporary contexts of environmental issues in Australia and their connection to global events and perspectives
  • Identify, and critically examine, key environmental issues
  • Be prepared and able to respond to diverse perspectives and approaches to environments, societies and sustainability
  • Understand and evaluate advanced concepts and academic texts
  • Assess, sort, and synthesise information in oral presentations, small group discussions, and written work

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Participation
  • Essay outline
  • Essay
  • Oral Presentation
  • Final Exam

Learning and teaching activities

  • The overall Unit Objectives are: 1. to provide an overview of the influences, factors and perspectives that have to be considered in relation to environment and society; 2. to describe major environmental issues, discuss causes and possible future pathways. The lectures are supplemented by a series of participatory small-group tutorials – tutorial topics are co-ordinated and allied to the lecture subjects for that week. In addition, a 300 word essay outline is due in week 4 and then a 2500 word essay (on one of several set subjects) is due at the end of the mid-session break. Students deliver a short oral presentation in the final weeks of the session. Key background theory is assessed by a short answer and essay in a final exam. The four types of progressive assessment are designed to spread the demands and to give all students flexibility and a fair opportunity to demonstrate knowledge and competence, while permitting benefit from particular interests or skills.

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Identify, and critically examine, key environmental issues
  • Be prepared and able to respond to diverse perspectives and approaches to environments, societies and sustainability
  • Understand and evaluate advanced concepts and academic texts
  • Assess, sort, and synthesise information in oral presentations, small group discussions, and written work

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Participation
  • Essay outline
  • Essay
  • Final Exam

Learning and teaching activities

  • The overall Unit Objectives are: 1. to provide an overview of the influences, factors and perspectives that have to be considered in relation to environment and society; 2. to describe major environmental issues, discuss causes and possible future pathways. The lectures are supplemented by a series of participatory small-group tutorials – tutorial topics are co-ordinated and allied to the lecture subjects for that week. In addition, a 300 word essay outline is due in week 4 and then a 2500 word essay (on one of several set subjects) is due at the end of the mid-session break. Students deliver a short oral presentation in the final weeks of the session. Key background theory is assessed by a short answer and essay in a final exam. The four types of progressive assessment are designed to spread the demands and to give all students flexibility and a fair opportunity to demonstrate knowledge and competence, while permitting benefit from particular interests or skills.

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the mutually shaping forces of societies and ecologies in producing environmental dilemmas
  • Identify, and critically examine, key environmental issues
  • Assess, sort, and synthesise information in oral presentations, small group discussions, and written work

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Participation
  • Essay
  • Oral Presentation
  • Final Exam

Learning and teaching activities

  • The overall Unit Objectives are: 1. to provide an overview of the influences, factors and perspectives that have to be considered in relation to environment and society; 2. to describe major environmental issues, discuss causes and possible future pathways. The lectures are supplemented by a series of participatory small-group tutorials – tutorial topics are co-ordinated and allied to the lecture subjects for that week. In addition, a 300 word essay outline is due in week 4 and then a 2500 word essay (on one of several set subjects) is due at the end of the mid-session break. Students deliver a short oral presentation in the final weeks of the session. Key background theory is assessed by a short answer and essay in a final exam. The four types of progressive assessment are designed to spread the demands and to give all students flexibility and a fair opportunity to demonstrate knowledge and competence, while permitting benefit from particular interests or skills.

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Assess, sort, and synthesise information in oral presentations, small group discussions, and written work

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Participation
  • Essay outline
  • Essay
  • Oral Presentation
  • Final Exam

Learning and teaching activities

  • The overall Unit Objectives are: 1. to provide an overview of the influences, factors and perspectives that have to be considered in relation to environment and society; 2. to describe major environmental issues, discuss causes and possible future pathways. The lectures are supplemented by a series of participatory small-group tutorials – tutorial topics are co-ordinated and allied to the lecture subjects for that week. In addition, a 300 word essay outline is due in week 4 and then a 2500 word essay (on one of several set subjects) is due at the end of the mid-session break. Students deliver a short oral presentation in the final weeks of the session. Key background theory is assessed by a short answer and essay in a final exam. The four types of progressive assessment are designed to spread the demands and to give all students flexibility and a fair opportunity to demonstrate knowledge and competence, while permitting benefit from particular interests or skills.

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the mutually shaping forces of societies and ecologies in producing environmental dilemmas
  • Understand some of the main historical and contemporary contexts of environmental issues in Australia and their connection to global events and perspectives
  • Identify, and critically examine, key environmental issues
  • Be prepared and able to respond to diverse perspectives and approaches to environments, societies and sustainability
  • Assess, sort, and synthesise information in oral presentations, small group discussions, and written work

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Participation
  • Essay
  • Oral Presentation

Learning and teaching activities

  • The overall Unit Objectives are: 1. to provide an overview of the influences, factors and perspectives that have to be considered in relation to environment and society; 2. to describe major environmental issues, discuss causes and possible future pathways. The lectures are supplemented by a series of participatory small-group tutorials – tutorial topics are co-ordinated and allied to the lecture subjects for that week. In addition, a 300 word essay outline is due in week 4 and then a 2500 word essay (on one of several set subjects) is due at the end of the mid-session break. Students deliver a short oral presentation in the final weeks of the session. Key background theory is assessed by a short answer and essay in a final exam. The four types of progressive assessment are designed to spread the demands and to give all students flexibility and a fair opportunity to demonstrate knowledge and competence, while permitting benefit from particular interests or skills.

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the mutually shaping forces of societies and ecologies in producing environmental dilemmas
  • Understand some of the main historical and contemporary contexts of environmental issues in Australia and their connection to global events and perspectives
  • Identify, and critically examine, key environmental issues
  • Assess, sort, and synthesise information in oral presentations, small group discussions, and written work

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Participation
  • Essay
  • Oral Presentation

Learning and teaching activities

  • The overall Unit Objectives are: 1. to provide an overview of the influences, factors and perspectives that have to be considered in relation to environment and society; 2. to describe major environmental issues, discuss causes and possible future pathways. The lectures are supplemented by a series of participatory small-group tutorials – tutorial topics are co-ordinated and allied to the lecture subjects for that week. In addition, a 300 word essay outline is due in week 4 and then a 2500 word essay (on one of several set subjects) is due at the end of the mid-session break. Students deliver a short oral presentation in the final weeks of the session. Key background theory is assessed by a short answer and essay in a final exam. The four types of progressive assessment are designed to spread the demands and to give all students flexibility and a fair opportunity to demonstrate knowledge and competence, while permitting benefit from particular interests or skills.

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Assess, sort, and synthesise information in oral presentations, small group discussions, and written work

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Participation
  • Essay
  • Oral Presentation
  • Final Exam

Learning and teaching activities

  • The overall Unit Objectives are: 1. to provide an overview of the influences, factors and perspectives that have to be considered in relation to environment and society; 2. to describe major environmental issues, discuss causes and possible future pathways. The lectures are supplemented by a series of participatory small-group tutorials – tutorial topics are co-ordinated and allied to the lecture subjects for that week. In addition, a 300 word essay outline is due in week 4 and then a 2500 word essay (on one of several set subjects) is due at the end of the mid-session break. Students deliver a short oral presentation in the final weeks of the session. Key background theory is assessed by a short answer and essay in a final exam. The four types of progressive assessment are designed to spread the demands and to give all students flexibility and a fair opportunity to demonstrate knowledge and competence, while permitting benefit from particular interests or skills.

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the mutually shaping forces of societies and ecologies in producing environmental dilemmas
  • Understand some of the main historical and contemporary contexts of environmental issues in Australia and their connection to global events and perspectives
  • Identify, and critically examine, key environmental issues
  • Understand and evaluate advanced concepts and academic texts
  • Assess, sort, and synthesise information in oral presentations, small group discussions, and written work

Assessment tasks

  • Tutorial Participation
  • Oral Presentation

Learning and teaching activities

  • The overall Unit Objectives are: 1. to provide an overview of the influences, factors and perspectives that have to be considered in relation to environment and society; 2. to describe major environmental issues, discuss causes and possible future pathways. The lectures are supplemented by a series of participatory small-group tutorials – tutorial topics are co-ordinated and allied to the lecture subjects for that week. In addition, a 300 word essay outline is due in week 4 and then a 2500 word essay (on one of several set subjects) is due at the end of the mid-session break. Students deliver a short oral presentation in the final weeks of the session. Key background theory is assessed by a short answer and essay in a final exam. The four types of progressive assessment are designed to spread the demands and to give all students flexibility and a fair opportunity to demonstrate knowledge and competence, while permitting benefit from particular interests or skills.

Changes from Previous Offering

Many apologies for any inconvenience caused by some changes of some lecture topics and tutorial readings to this Unit. Changes have been made in order to include contemporary cutting-edge theories and examples of environment and society, to offer a greater variety of skills as well as to cater for diverse ways of learning.