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MEDI202 – Renal and Alimentary 1

2017 – MED 3

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff
Mirjana Strkalj
Credit points Credit points
3
Prerequisites Prerequisites
Admission to BClinSc
Corequisites Corequisites
MEDI201
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
You will build up on the knowledge of macroscopic and microscopic structure of the urinary and digestive systems acquired in HLTH108. This unit offers an in depth, integrated study of these systems’ anatomy and physiology. Topics covered in this unit require students to apply the knowledge of the development, structure and function of the urinary and digestive systems to basic clinical scenarios. This unit provides a foundation for the more complex biomedical and clinical concepts as well as integration of structure and function with the disease processes, presented in MEDI302. MEDI202 is an intense 5 weeks course with self-directed on line learning, tutorial based discussion sessions, anatomy and simulation lab practical sessions, studying histophysiology on digitalized images, self-assessment tasks and examination.

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at http://students.mq.edu.au/student_admin/enrolmentguide/academicdates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe the structural components of the urinary and digestive systems and structural organisation of the abdominopelvic wall and viscera.
  2. Apply the knowledge of the structure and function of the gastrointestinal system to describe its motility and nervous regulation, secretory function and principles of gastrointestinal absorption.
  3. Identify structural components of the nephron to allow interpretation of its function and contribution to fluid and electrolyte homeostasis.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the embryological development of the major structures of the digestive and urinary systems and apply that knowledge to describe common embryological abnormalities.
  5. Apply the knowledge of normal renal and gastrointestinal function to analyse abnormalities present in clinical case scenarios and justify findings to peers and tutors.

General Assessment Information

Grade descriptors and other information concerning grading are contained in the Macquarie University Grading Policy, which is available at:http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/grading/policy.html

To pass this unit, students must demonstrate sufficient evidence of achievement of the learning outcomes.

Further details for each assessment task will be available on iLearn including marking rubrics.

All final grades in the Bachelor of Clinical Science are determined by a grading committee and are not the sole responsibility of the Unit Convenor.

Students will be awarded one of these grades plus a Standardised Numerical Grade (SNG). The SNG is not necessarily a summation of the individual assessment components. The final grade and SNG that are awarded reflect the corresponding grade descriptor in the Grading Policy.

Extensions for Assessment tasks

Applications for assessment task extensions must be submitted via www.ask.mq.edu.au. For further details please refer to the Disruption to Studies Policy available at http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/  disruption_studies/policy.html

Late Submission of Work

All assignments which are officially received after the due date, and where no extension has been granted by the course convenor or tutor, will incur a deduction of 10% for the first day, and 10% for each subsequent day including the actual day on which the work is received. Weekends and public holidays are included. For example:

Due date Received Days late Deduction Raw mark Final mark
Friday 14th Monday 17th 3 30% 75% 45%

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Hurdle Due
AT1 60% Weeks 3&5
AT2 10% Weeks 2&5
AT3 30% Week 5

AT1

Due: Weeks 3&5
Weighting: 60%

2 x Mini Exams in class assessment tasks


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Describe the structural components of the urinary and digestive systems and structural organisation of the abdominopelvic wall and viscera.
  • Apply the knowledge of the structure and function of the gastrointestinal system to describe its motility and nervous regulation, secretory function and principles of gastrointestinal absorption.
  • Identify structural components of the nephron to allow interpretation of its function and contribution to fluid and electrolyte homeostasis.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the embryological development of the major structures of the digestive and urinary systems and apply that knowledge to describe common embryological abnormalities.
  • Apply the knowledge of normal renal and gastrointestinal function to analyse abnormalities present in clinical case scenarios and justify findings to peers and tutors.

AT2

Due: Weeks 2&5
Weighting: 10%

2 x Online Activities


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Describe the structural components of the urinary and digestive systems and structural organisation of the abdominopelvic wall and viscera.
  • Apply the knowledge of the structure and function of the gastrointestinal system to describe its motility and nervous regulation, secretory function and principles of gastrointestinal absorption.
  • Identify structural components of the nephron to allow interpretation of its function and contribution to fluid and electrolyte homeostasis.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the embryological development of the major structures of the digestive and urinary systems and apply that knowledge to describe common embryological abnormalities.
  • Apply the knowledge of normal renal and gastrointestinal function to analyse abnormalities present in clinical case scenarios and justify findings to peers and tutors.

AT3

Due: Week 5
Weighting: 30%

Practical Test


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Describe the structural components of the urinary and digestive systems and structural organisation of the abdominopelvic wall and viscera.
  • Apply the knowledge of the structure and function of the gastrointestinal system to describe its motility and nervous regulation, secretory function and principles of gastrointestinal absorption.
  • Identify structural components of the nephron to allow interpretation of its function and contribution to fluid and electrolyte homeostasis.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the embryological development of the major structures of the digestive and urinary systems and apply that knowledge to describe common embryological abnormalities.

Delivery and Resources

Delivery and Resources

Classes

The following compulsory classes are scheduled for this unit:

1. 2 hour lecture weeks 1-5

2. 1 1/2 hour anatomy laboratory session, weeks 1-4, week 5 laboratory practical test

3. 1 hour simulation lab session, weeks 1-5

4. 1x1 hour tutorial session per week, weeks 1-5

5. 7-8 hours per week self-instructional learning, set readings from the text and exercises on learning topics

Required and Recommended Texts

Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology, 13th Edition (2015). Saunders. ISBN: 978-1-4557-7005-2

Moore KL and Dalley AF. 2014. Clinically Oriented Anatomy 7th ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Ross MH and Pawlina W. 2006. Histology a Text and Atlas 5th ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Abrahams PH, Boon J, and Spratt JD. 2009.

McMinn’s Clinical Atlas of Human Anatomy. 6th ed. Mosby/Saunder Elsevier.

Unit Schedule

Week  Learning Topic
Week 1 Oral cavity, pharynx, oesophagus and  stomach, mechanical and chemical digestion, motility of the GIT
Week 2 Duodenum and pancreas, liver and biliary apparatus, physiology of GIT secretion
Week 3 Small and large intestine and gastrointestinal tract absorption
Week 4 An overview of the structure and  function of the urinary system. The nephron as a structural unit and production of urine.
Week 5 Body fluid compartments, regulation of extracellular fluid osmolarity and sodium concentration

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy (in effect until Dec 4th, 2017): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html

Special Consideration Policy (in effect from Dec 4th, 2017): https://staff.mq.edu.au/work/strategy-planning-and-governance/university-policies-and-procedures/policies/special-consideration

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills

Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe the structural components of the urinary and digestive systems and structural organisation of the abdominopelvic wall and viscera.
  • Apply the knowledge of the structure and function of the gastrointestinal system to describe its motility and nervous regulation, secretory function and principles of gastrointestinal absorption.
  • Identify structural components of the nephron to allow interpretation of its function and contribution to fluid and electrolyte homeostasis.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the embryological development of the major structures of the digestive and urinary systems and apply that knowledge to describe common embryological abnormalities.
  • Apply the knowledge of normal renal and gastrointestinal function to analyse abnormalities present in clinical case scenarios and justify findings to peers and tutors.

Assessment tasks

  • AT1
  • AT2
  • AT3

Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Apply the knowledge of the structure and function of the gastrointestinal system to describe its motility and nervous regulation, secretory function and principles of gastrointestinal absorption.
  • Identify structural components of the nephron to allow interpretation of its function and contribution to fluid and electrolyte homeostasis.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the embryological development of the major structures of the digestive and urinary systems and apply that knowledge to describe common embryological abnormalities.
  • Apply the knowledge of normal renal and gastrointestinal function to analyse abnormalities present in clinical case scenarios and justify findings to peers and tutors.

Assessment tasks

  • AT1
  • AT2
  • AT3

Problem Solving and Research Capability

Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe the structural components of the urinary and digestive systems and structural organisation of the abdominopelvic wall and viscera.
  • Apply the knowledge of the structure and function of the gastrointestinal system to describe its motility and nervous regulation, secretory function and principles of gastrointestinal absorption.
  • Identify structural components of the nephron to allow interpretation of its function and contribution to fluid and electrolyte homeostasis.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the embryological development of the major structures of the digestive and urinary systems and apply that knowledge to describe common embryological abnormalities.
  • Apply the knowledge of normal renal and gastrointestinal function to analyse abnormalities present in clinical case scenarios and justify findings to peers and tutors.

Assessment tasks

  • AT1
  • AT2
  • AT3

Creative and Innovative

Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Apply the knowledge of normal renal and gastrointestinal function to analyse abnormalities present in clinical case scenarios and justify findings to peers and tutors.

Effective Communication

We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Apply the knowledge of the structure and function of the gastrointestinal system to describe its motility and nervous regulation, secretory function and principles of gastrointestinal absorption.
  • Identify structural components of the nephron to allow interpretation of its function and contribution to fluid and electrolyte homeostasis.
  • Apply the knowledge of normal renal and gastrointestinal function to analyse abnormalities present in clinical case scenarios and justify findings to peers and tutors.

Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens

As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation's historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Apply the knowledge of normal renal and gastrointestinal function to analyse abnormalities present in clinical case scenarios and justify findings to peers and tutors.

Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible

We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Apply the knowledge of normal renal and gastrointestinal function to analyse abnormalities present in clinical case scenarios and justify findings to peers and tutors.

Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative

We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Apply the knowledge of normal renal and gastrointestinal function to analyse abnormalities present in clinical case scenarios and justify findings to peers and tutors.

Commitment to Continuous Learning

Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing - personally, professionally and socially.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Describe the structural components of the urinary and digestive systems and structural organisation of the abdominopelvic wall and viscera.
  • Apply the knowledge of the structure and function of the gastrointestinal system to describe its motility and nervous regulation, secretory function and principles of gastrointestinal absorption.
  • Identify structural components of the nephron to allow interpretation of its function and contribution to fluid and electrolyte homeostasis.
  • Apply the knowledge of normal renal and gastrointestinal function to analyse abnormalities present in clinical case scenarios and justify findings to peers and tutors.

Assessment tasks

  • AT1
  • AT2
  • AT3

Changes from Previous Offering

This is a second year offering of this unit. The following changes are implemented:

Reduced the number of Mini-Exams from four to two, increasing the duration and weighting of each mini-exam – these changes are aligned with those proposed for MEDI201 (the co-taught MED3 unit). N.B. The total volume of exam format assessment remains unchanged.

The number of Online Learning Activities has been reduced to two – these changes are aligned with those proposed for MEDI201 (the co-taught MED3 unit).

Tutorial one, which was face to face tutorial, is now moved to online learning in preparation for the in class discussion in the Simulation lab.