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ECHX825 – Early Childhood Professional Practice 2

2017 – S1 OUA

General Information

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Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit convenor and teaching staff Unit Coordinator
Belinda Davis
Contact via ilearn
Lecturer/ Tutor
Wendy Shepherd
Contact via ilearn
Lecturer/ Tutor
Angela Chng
Contact via ilearn
Prerequisites Prerequisites
ECHX603 or ECEX603
Corequisites Corequisites
Co-badged status Co-badged status
Unit description Unit description
In this unit you will build on the knowledge of early childhood theory and practice that you gained from your experiences in ECEX603. You will extend your understanding of critical reflection and your personal professional philosophy as a developing teacher. Central to this unit is a 20 day professional experience placement where you will develop your awareness of the professional role and responsibilities of an early childhood teacher working with children from two to five years. This unit therefore combines theory and practice to enable you to construct your practical knowledge of teaching and learning through guided reflection. All enrolment queries should be directed to Open Universities Australia (OUA): see www.open.edu.au

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://www.open.edu.au/student-admin-and-support/key-dates/

Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate the link between theory, the Early Years Learning Framework (DEEWR, 2009) and planning for children aged 2-5 years.
  2. Systematically document and critically analyse the pedagogies and practices of teaching and learning, including ways to guide children's behaviour.
  3. Demonstrate the capacity to articulate a personal philosophy of professional practice as a teacher of young children.
  4. Critically examine ideas, issues and principles connected with professional decision-making as a teacher in an early childhood setting.
  5. Demonstrate the value of an anti bias approach when working with young children and their families.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the reflective practitioner.

General Assessment Information

General information

Students need to receive a satisfactory grade at the completion of the Professional Experience placement and achieve a grade of 50% or more in order to be eligible to pass this unit.

Detailed information for each individual assessment can be found on the iLearn site under Assessment.

Please follow these guidelines when you submit each assignment:

  • Allow a left and right-hand margin of at least 2cm in all assignments.
  • Please type all assignments using 12-point font and 1.5 spacing.
  • All assessments must be submitted through turnitin in .doc or .pdf format for submission.
  • Faculty assignment cover sheets are NOT required for this unit.

 

Draft Submissions & Turnitin Originality Reports

  • Students may use Turnitin’s Originality Report as a learning tool to improve their academic writing if this option is made available in the unit.
  • Students are strongly encouraged to upload a draft copy of each assessment to Turnitin at least one week prior to the due date to obtain an Originality Report.
  • The Originality Report provides students with a similarity index that may indicate if plagiarism has occurred. Students will be able to make amendments to their drafts prior to their final submission on the due date.
  • Only one Originality Report is generated every 24 hours up to the due date.

 

When preparing your assignments, it is essential that:

  • Students must retain a copy of all assignments before submission, and retain the copy until the final grade for the subject has been received;
  • Marks will be deducted if the assessment is submitted after the due date and time (refer to the ‘late assessments’ section below for more details);
  • Unless there are exceptional circumstances, no assessment will be accepted after the date that the assessment has been returned to other students.
  • If an assessment is considered to be below passing standard, another staff member on the unit will provide a second opinion. No failed assessment may be re-submitted.

 

Late Assessments:

A deduction of 5% of the total possible mark allocated for that assessment would be made for each day or part day that assessment is late, weekends counting as two days. For example, if an assessment is worth 20 marks and it is submitted 2 days late, 2 marks (2 x 5% of 20 marks) will be subtracted from the awarded mark.

 

Extensions:

In extenuating circumstances, students may apply to the unit coordinator for an extension to the assessment due date. Reasons for the extension need to be documented through the special consideration form accessible through ask.mq.edu.au and supported (e.g., a doctor’s certificate in the case of illness).

Note that:

  • Students MUST speak with the unit coordinator prior to submitting their request through https://ask.mq.edu.au
  • Extensions will only be granted in receipt of the completed form submitted through ask.mq.edu.au plus documentation.
  • Emails are not appropriate means of extension requests.
  • It is essential that students plan ahead and organise their study time effectively. Poor time management is not grounds for an extension.
  • In the case of computer malfunction, a draft of the assignment may be requested. Please ensure that a draft is printed regularly, so that it is available for submission on request.   
  • Extensions are usually not granted on the due date.

 

Referencing: 

All assignments should cite and provide full bibliographical details of all material that used to inform or support ideas. At the Institute of Early Childhood, students are required to use the American Psychological Association (APA) referencing procedures. Full details about how to cite and reference correctly can be found in Perrin (2015). All students will need to download this guide and use it as they prepare their assignment.

 

Highly recommended text

Perrin, R. (2015). Pocket guide to APA style (5th ed.). Wadsworth: Cengage Learning.

Grades

The final grade a student receives signifies their overall performance in meeting the learning outcomes for the unit. The number assigned to a grade (Standard Numerical Grade or SNG) reflects the extent to which student attainment matches the grade descriptors.

The raw mark for the unit (i.e., the total of the marks for each assessment item) may not be the same as the SNG. Results may be scaled to ensure there is a degree of comparability across the university, so that units with the same past performances of their students should achieve similar results. The process of scaling does not change the order of marks among students. A student who receives a higher raw score mark than another will also receive a higher final scaled mark.

HD           High Distinction  85-100% 

Provides consistent evidence of deep and critical understanding in relation to the learning outcomes. There is substantial originality and insight in identifying, generating and communicating competing arguments, perspectives or problem solving approaches; critical evaluation of problems, their solutions and their implications; creativity in application as appropriate to the discipline.

D             Distinction  75-84%

Provides evidence of integration and evaluation of critical ideas, principles and theories, distinctive insight and ability in applying relevant skills and concepts in relation to learning outcomes. There is demonstration of frequent originality in defining and analysing issues or problems and providing solutions; and the use of means of communication appropriate to the discipline and the audience.

Cr            Credit  65-74%

Provides evidence of learning that goes beyond replication of content knowledge or skills relevant to the learning outcomes. There is demonstration of substantial understanding of fundamental concepts in the field of study and the ability to apply these concepts in a variety of contexts; convincing argumentation with appropriate coherent justification; communication of ideas fluently and clearly in terms of the conventions of the discipline.

P              Pass  50-64%

Provides sufficient evidence of the achievement of learning outcomes. There is demonstration of understanding and application of fundamental concepts of the field of study; routine argumentation with acceptable justification; communication of information and ideas adequately in terms of the conventions of the discipline. The learning attainment is considered satisfactory or adequate or competent or capable in relation to the specified outcomes.

F              Fail  0-49%

Does not provide evidence of attainment of learning outcomes. There is missing or partial or superficial or faulty understanding and application of the fundamental concepts in the field of study; missing, undeveloped, inappropriate or confusing argumentation; incomplete, confusing or lacking communication of ideas in ways that give little attention to the conventions of the discipline.

Assessment Tasks

Name Weighting Due
Parent newsletter supplement 20% 29th March 2017
An anti bias approach 40% 3rd May 2017
Professional Experience 40% 14th June 2017

Parent newsletter supplement

Due: 29th March 2017
Weighting: 20%

This assessment will enable students to articulate appropriate teaching strategies to use with children 2-5 year and determine appropriate strategies to guide young children's behaviour.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Systematically document and critically analyse the pedagogies and practices of teaching and learning, including ways to guide children's behaviour.
  • Critically examine ideas, issues and principles connected with professional decision-making as a teacher in an early childhood setting.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the reflective practitioner.

An anti bias approach

Due: 3rd May 2017
Weighting: 40%

This assessment will enable students to explore principles of anti bias education and their application with children 2-5 years.


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate the link between theory, the Early Years Learning Framework (DEEWR, 2009) and planning for children aged 2-5 years.
  • Demonstrate the capacity to articulate a personal philosophy of professional practice as a teacher of young children.
  • Critically examine ideas, issues and principles connected with professional decision-making as a teacher in an early childhood setting.
  • Demonstrate the value of an anti bias approach when working with young children and their families.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the reflective practitioner.

Professional Experience

Due: 14th June 2017
Weighting: 40%

3a) Documenting children’s learning - Components of the professional experience folder (40%)

3b) Professional Experience working as an early childhood teacher -  Evaluation Report (S/U)


This Assessment Task relates to the following Learning Outcomes:
  • Demonstrate the link between theory, the Early Years Learning Framework (DEEWR, 2009) and planning for children aged 2-5 years.
  • Demonstrate the capacity to articulate a personal philosophy of professional practice as a teacher of young children.
  • Critically examine ideas, issues and principles connected with professional decision-making as a teacher in an early childhood setting.
  • Demonstrate the value of an anti bias approach when working with young children and their families.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the reflective practitioner.

Delivery and Resources

Please note: It is the responsibility of individual students to be aware of pre and co requisites throughout their program. If you are considering withdrawing from this unit please seek academic advice as this may impact on your progression throughout the degree.

1.     Required Textbooks

Arthur, L., Beecher, B., Death, E., Dockett, S., & Farmer, S. (2015). Programming and planning in early childhood settings. (6th ed.) Victoria: Thomson.

MacNaughton, G., & Williams, G. (2009). Techniques for teaching young children: Choices in theory and practice. (3rd ed.). NSW: Pearson Education.

Porter, L. (2016). Young children’s behaviour: Guidance approaches for early childhood educators. (4th ed.). Sydney: Allen & Unwin.

Earlier editions of these textbooks will be suitable for this unit

Assumed Texts

Crowther, I. (2016). Creating effective learning environments (4th ed.). Ontario: Thomson.

2.     Weekly required reading schedule:

There is a combination of readings from your textbooks and readings which can be sourced via Multisearch on the library website. A link is available through iLearn under: Learning support & resources. In addition to chapters from your textbooks, you will need to read the following: 

Week 1

Early Years Learning Framework

http://docs.education.gov.au/system/files/doc/other/belonging_being_and_becoming_the_early_years_learning_framework_for_australia.pdf

Arthur, L., Beecher, B., Death, E., Dockett, S., & Farmer, S. (2015). Programming and planning in early childhood settings. (6th ed.) Victoria: Thomson. Chapter 7 (or Chapter 8 in 2012 edition.)

Porter, L. (2016). Young children’s behaviour: Guidance approaches for early childhood educators. (4th ed.). Sydney: Allen & Unwin. Chapters 1 & 2 (or Chapter 1 in 2008 edition)

Week 2

Curtis, D., & Carter, M. (2008). Learning together with young children: A curriculum framework for reflective teachers. St. Paul, MN: Redleaf Press (chapter 6).

MacNaughton, G., & Williams, G. (2009). Techniques for teaching young children: Choices in theory and practice. (3rd ed.). NSW: Pearson Education. (Chapter 9)

Porter, L. (2016). Young children’s behaviour: Guidance approaches for early childhood educators. (4th ed.). Sydney: Allen & Unwin. Chapter 15 (or 2008 Chapter 13)

Week 3

Arthur, L., Beecher, B., Death, E., Dockett, S., & Farmer, S. (2015). Programming and planning in early childhood settings. (6th ed.) Victoria: Thomson. Chapter 9 (or Chapter 10 in 2012 edition.)

Epstein, A.S. (2015). The intentional teacher. Choosing the best strategies for young children’s learning. Washington: NAEYC. (chapter 1)

Porter, L. (2016). Young children’s behaviour: Guidance approaches for early childhood educators. (4th ed.). Sydney: Allen & Unwin. Chapter 16 (or 2008 Chapter 14)

MacNaughton, G., & Williams, G. (2009). Techniques for teaching young children: Choices in theory and practice. (3rd ed.). NSW: Pearson Education. (Chapter 25)

Week 4

Derman-Sparks, L, LeeKeenan, L, & Nimmo, J (2015). Leading anti-bias early childhood programs. A guide for change. New York: Teachers College Press. (chapter 3)

MacNaughton, G., & Williams, G. (2009). Techniques for teaching young children: Choices in theory and practice. (3rd ed.). NSW: Pearson Education. (Chapter 22).

Week 5

MacNaughton, G., & Williams, G. (2009). Techniques for teaching young children: Choices in theory and practice. (3rd ed.). NSW: Pearson Education. (Chapter 25)

Porter, L. (2016). Young children’s behaviour: Guidance approaches for early childhood educators. (4th ed.). Sydney: Allen & Unwin. Chapters 5 & 6 (2008 Chapters 3 & 4)

Week 6

Arthur, L., Beecher, B., Death, E., Dockett, S., & Farmer, S. (2015). Programming and planning in early childhood settings. (6th ed.) Victoria: Thomson. Chapter 10 (or Chapter 11 in 2012 edition)

Porter, L. (2016). Young children’s behaviour: Guidance approaches for early childhood educators. (4th ed.). Sydney: Allen & Unwin. Chapter 13 (or 2008 Chapter 11)

2017 Institute of Early Childhood, Macquarie University Professional Experience Handbook.

Retrieved from:

http://www.iec.mq.edu.au/current_students/current_undergraduate_students/professional_ experience/

Week 7

Arthur, L., Beecher, B., Death, E., Dockett, S., & Farmer, S. (2015). Programming and planning in early childhood settings. (6th ed.) Victoria: Thomson. Chapter 8 (Or Chapter 9 in 2012 edition)

Fleet, A., Honig, T., Robertson, J., Semann, A. & Shepherd, W. (2011). What's pedagogy anyway. Retrieved from:

http://www.cscentral.org.au/Resources/what-is-pedagogy-anyway-.pdf

Week 8

Porter, L. (2016). Young children’s behaviour: Guidance approaches for early childhood educators. (4th ed.). Sydney: Allen & Unwin. Chapter 18 (2008 Chapter 17)

Ashton, J., Woodrow, C., Johnston, C., Wangmann, J., Singh, L., & James, T. (2008). Partnerships in learning: Linking early childhood services, families and schools for optimal development. Australian Journal of Early Childhood, 33(2), 10-16.

Week 9

Connor, J. (2012). Foundations for learning: Relationships between the early years learning framework and the Australian curriculum (An ECA–ACARA paper). Retrieved from: http://foundationinquirylearning.global2.vic.edu.au/files/2013/06/ECA_ACARA_Foundations_Paper-2cq59mi.pdf

Dockett. S. & Perry, B. (2014). Continuity of learning: A resource to support effective transition to school and school aged care. Retrieved from: http://docs.education.gov.au/node/36571

Weeks 10, 11 & 12

Professional Experience

No required readings

Week 13

Reflections on Professional Experience

No required readings

The following texts can be downloaded from the links:

Australian Government Department of Education Employment and Workplace Relations. (2009). Belonging, being & becoming: The early years learning framework for Australia.  Australia: Commonwealth of Australia. Retrieved from http://files.acecqa.gov.au/files/National-Quality-Framework-Resources-Kit/belonging_being_and_becoming_the_early_years_learning_framework_for_australia.pdf

Australian Government Department of Education Employment and Workplace Relations. (2010). Educators being, belonging & becoming: Educators’ guide to the early years learning framework of Australia.  Australia: Commonwealth of Australia. Retrieved from http://files.acecqa.gov.au/files/National-Quality-Framework-Resources-Kit/educators_guide_to_the_early_years_learning_framework_for_australia.pdf

Early Childhood Australia. (2016). Early childhood Australia code of ethics.  Retrieved from http://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/ECA-COE-Brochure-2016.pdf.

 

Unit Schedule

Week  beginning

Topic for the week

Week 1

Feb 27

Introduction to the unit:Pedagogy and approaches to curriculum

Week 2

March 6

Environments and invitations to play

 

Week 3

March 13

Establishing meaningful relationships with children

 

Week 4

March 20

Honouring diversity in contemporary society

Week 5

March 27

Guiding children's behaviour 

ASSESSMENT 1 DUE: 29th March 5pm

Week 6

April 3

Professional Experience: Guidelines and expectations

 

Week 7

April 10

Introducing pedagogical documentation

April 17-

April 29

Mid-semester Break

Study Period

 

Week 8

May 2

Working in partnership with families 

ASSESSMENT 2 DUE: 3rd May 5pm

Week 9

May 8

Transition to school for children and families

 

Weeks 10,11,12

May 15- June 2

Professional Experience

Week 13

 

June 5

 

Reflections on Professional Experience

 

ASSESSMENT 3 DUE: 14th June, 5pm

Learning and Teaching Activities

Information necessary for this unit

Students are expected to read the following documents as part of the unit: - ECED 825 unit guide - detailed assessment information - Professional Experience Guidelines - Professional Experience Handbook 2017

Unit Expectations

Expectations for students: come to sessions prepared having listened to the lecture, read the weekly readings and completed the assigned tasks. Students need to be prepared to: - read widely and give thoughtful consideration to the ideas encountered - participate fully in online and on campus discussions and activities - submit all assessments - undertake 20 days of Professional Experience (5 observation days and 15 teaching days) and fulfil all Professional Experience requirements - submit the Professional Experience Evaluation form on completion of placement.

Professional Experience

Students will be expected to complete three weeks of Professional Experience from Monday 15th May – Friday 2nd June 2017. Prior to this, students are expected to negotiate with the cooperating teacher to complete five (6) observation days at times which do not impact on attendance at tutorials for this or other units. Students will be assessed as satisfactory or unsatisfactory against the Professional Experience Evaluation form.

Policies and Procedures

Late Submission

Unless otherwise stated, late submission of written work will result in a deduction of 10% of the mark awarded for each week or part of a week beyond the due date, or date to which an extension has been granted.

Extension Request

Disruption to Studies Procedure (http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/procedure.html)

The University recognises that students may experience disruptions that adversely affect their academic performance in assessment activities.

The disruption to studies policy (http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html) applies only to serious and unavoidable disruptions that arise after a study period has commenced.

Serious and unavoidable disruption

The University classifies a disruption as serious and unavoidable if it:

  • could not have reasonably been anticipated, avoided or guarded against by the student; and
  • was beyond the student's control; and
  • caused substantial disruption to the student's capacity for effective study and/or completion of required work; and
  • occurred during an event critical study period and was at least three (3) consecutive days duration, and/or
  • prevented completion of a final examination.

If you feel that you've been impacted by a serious and unavoidable disruption to study situation, submit an application as follows:

  1. Visit Ask MQ (https://ask.mq.edu.au) and use your OneID to log in via 'Current student domestic and international'
  2. Under 'Forms' select 'disruptions' and fill in your relevant details.
  3. Attach supporting documents by clicking 'Add a reply', click 'browse' and navigating to the files you want to attach, then click 'submit form' to send your notification and supporting documents
  4. Please keep copies of your original documents, as they may be requested in the future as part of the assessment process

Review

Once your submission is assessed, recommendations are sent to your unit convenor to ensure an appropriate solution for affected assessment(s) is organised.

OUA Specific Policies and Procedures

OUA Special Circumstances Process

Special Circumstances refers to late withdrawal from a unit and your request to have your circumstances taken into account for a possible refund of fees and removal of a "fail" result.

Applications for Special Circumstances are to be submitted to Open Universities Australia directly:

https://www.open.edu.au/public/student-admin-and-support/student-support-services/special-circumstances

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central. Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

Academic Honesty Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html

Assessment Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy_2016.html

Grade Appeal Policy http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html

Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/complaint_management/procedure.html​

Disruption to Studies Policy http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html The Disruption to Studies Policy is effective from March 3 2014 and replaces the Special Consideration Policy.

In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/

Results

Results shown in iLearn, or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent. For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au.

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills (mq.edu.au/learningskills) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to improve your marks and take control of your study.

Student Enquiry Service

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

Equity Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

IT Help

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Graduate Capabilities

PG - Discipline Knowledge and Skills

Our postgraduates will be able to demonstrate a significantly enhanced depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content knowledge in their chosen fields.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Demonstrate the link between theory, the Early Years Learning Framework (DEEWR, 2009) and planning for children aged 2-5 years.
  • Systematically document and critically analyse the pedagogies and practices of teaching and learning, including ways to guide children's behaviour.
  • Demonstrate the capacity to articulate a personal philosophy of professional practice as a teacher of young children.
  • Critically examine ideas, issues and principles connected with professional decision-making as a teacher in an early childhood setting.
  • Demonstrate the value of an anti bias approach when working with young children and their families.

Assessment tasks

  • Parent newsletter supplement
  • An anti bias approach
  • Professional Experience

PG - Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking

Our postgraduates will be capable of utilising and reflecting on prior knowledge and experience, of applying higher level critical thinking skills, and of integrating and synthesising learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments. A characteristic of this form of thinking is the generation of new, professionally oriented knowledge through personal or group-based critique of practice and theory.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Systematically document and critically analyse the pedagogies and practices of teaching and learning, including ways to guide children's behaviour.
  • Demonstrate the capacity to articulate a personal philosophy of professional practice as a teacher of young children.
  • Critically examine ideas, issues and principles connected with professional decision-making as a teacher in an early childhood setting.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the reflective practitioner.

Assessment tasks

  • Parent newsletter supplement
  • An anti bias approach
  • Professional Experience

PG - Research and Problem Solving Capability

Our postgraduates will be capable of systematic enquiry; able to use research skills to create new knowledge that can be applied to real world issues, or contribute to a field of study or practice to enhance society. They will be capable of creative questioning, problem finding and problem solving.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Assessment task

  • Professional Experience

PG - Effective Communication

Our postgraduates will be able to communicate effectively and convey their views to different social, cultural, and professional audiences. They will be able to use a variety of technologically supported media to communicate with empathy using a range of written, spoken or visual formats.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Demonstrate the value of an anti bias approach when working with young children and their families.

Assessment tasks

  • An anti bias approach
  • Professional Experience

PG - Engaged and Responsible, Active and Ethical Citizens

Our postgraduates will be ethically aware and capable of confident transformative action in relation to their professional responsibilities and the wider community. They will have a sense of connectedness with others and country and have a sense of mutual obligation. They will be able to appreciate the impact of their professional roles for social justice and inclusion related to national and global issues

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcome

  • Demonstrate the value of an anti bias approach when working with young children and their families.

Assessment tasks

  • An anti bias approach
  • Professional Experience

PG - Capable of Professional and Personal Judgment and Initiative

Our postgraduates will demonstrate a high standard of discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgment. They will have the ability to make informed choices and decisions that reflect both the nature of their professional work and their personal perspectives.

This graduate capability is supported by:

Learning outcomes

  • Critically examine ideas, issues and principles connected with professional decision-making as a teacher in an early childhood setting.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the reflective practitioner.

Assessment tasks

  • Parent newsletter supplement
  • An anti bias approach
  • Professional Experience